36 episodes

Art of the Score is the podcast that explores, demystifies and celebrates some of the greatest soundtracks of all time from the world of film, TV and video games. In each episode we’ll be joined by Andrew Pogson, Dan Golding and Nicholas Buc as we check out a soundtrack we love and break down its main themes, explore what makes the score tick and hopefully impart our love of the world of soundtracks.

Art of the Score Andrew Pogson, Nicholas Buc and Dan Golding

    • Music
    • 4.9 • 490 Ratings

Art of the Score is the podcast that explores, demystifies and celebrates some of the greatest soundtracks of all time from the world of film, TV and video games. In each episode we’ll be joined by Andrew Pogson, Dan Golding and Nicholas Buc as we check out a soundtrack we love and break down its main themes, explore what makes the score tick and hopefully impart our love of the world of soundtracks.

    Episode 36: Interstellar

    Episode 36: Interstellar

    Time dilation is a funny thing. For many, we understand there’s been a bit of a gap between episodes. For us, however, it’s been mere minutes since our last appearance – but thanks for sticking around nonetheless, as we’re finally back to discuss Hans Zimmer, Christopher Nolan, time, and Interstellar. Join us as we chat all things organs, pianos, space travel, and answer the question of whether Interstellar is Zimmer’s greatest score of all.

    Episode notes:

    01:51 – Did you miss us?
    09:02 - interstellar!
    13:55 – Hans Zimmer and Christopher Nolan’s time together
    15:35 – The piece of paper and early demos
    24:31 – soft soft LOUD
    27:07 – The discovery theme, and Interstellar’s organ
    38:08 – Woodwinds of Change
    39:40 – Chastain’s piano
    41:25 – Countermelody of doom
    45:22 – The hope theme, loops and DAWs
    54:10 – Messages from home
    59:48 – The tesseract acts
    1:02:40 – Finding Anne Hathaway
    1:06:48 – Gravity
    1:13:35 – 2001: An Interstellar Odyssey
    1:20:48 – The humanity theme
    1:32:59 – The sound of silence
    1:37:55 – Time
    1:42:15 – Maths with Poggo
    1:49:45 – Dr Mann kind? No, he’s quite mean
    1:53:30 – Try spinning, that’s a good trick
    1:59:25 – Nick’s favourite ka-cue
    2:00:51 – V for Vinterstellar
    2:03:26 – Final thoughts

    We love to hear from our listeners – get in touch via Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, and if you like The Art of the Score, please take a moment to subscribe, rate and comment.

    Episode 35: Studio Fanfares Part 2

    Episode 35: Studio Fanfares Part 2

    It’s Episode 35, and the long-awaited part two to our investigation of a fascinating and often-overlooked area of film music history – studio fanfares. In this episode we travel from the 1980s to today, taking in the sights and sounds of evergreen studio fanfares from the likes of Jerry Goldsmith, John Williams, the THX Deep Note, and the Buc dynasty of screen composers. And of course, there’s a round of ‘Name That Theme’ with host Andrew Pogson, as well as a look at some of the most contemporary of logo themes – including Marvel, Star Wars, and a curious update of MGM’s Leo the Lion.

    Show notes:

    2:50 – The Art of the Score fanfare – Nancy Buc (1980)
    4:34 – The studio revival in the 1980s
    5:42 – Amblin Entertainment – John Williams (1981)
    9:14 – The Ladd Company – John Williams (1981)
    12:29 – United Artists – Joe Harnell (1982)
    15:54 – THX Deep Note – James Andy Moorer (1983)
    22:13 – Tri-Star Pictures – Dave Grusin (1984)
    25:46 – Carolco Pictures – Jerry Goldsmith (1985)
    28:42 – And now, the news
    33:10 – Disney – John Debney (1985)
    36:26 – THX Cimarron – James Horner (1988)
    39:43 – Castle Rock Entertainment – Marc Shaiman (1989)
    42:56 – Warner Bros. and an off day in the synth studio
    44:30 – The Art of the Score fanfare – Barry Buc (1990)
    46:21 – Universal – James Horner (1990)
    50:46 – Hollywood Pictures – Danny Elfman (1990)
    51:42 – Village Roadshow (1992)
    53:53 – Columbia – Jonathan Elias (1993)
    56:50 – Studio fanfares you might have heard before…
    1:02:28 – New Line Cinema – Michael Kamen (1994)
    1:05:34 – United Artists – Starr Parodi and Jeff Eden Fair (1994)
    1:09:05 – Disney and Pixar – Randy Newman (1995)
    1:10:26 – HBO (1996)
    1:11:35 – Dreamworks – John Williams (1997)
    1:14:56 – Universal – Jerry Goldsmith (1997)
    1:19:31 – Warner Bros. – Gabriel Yared (1999)
    1:21:39 – The Art of the Score fanfare – Tobias H. Buc (2000)
    1:23:53 – Sony Home Entertainment and Animation (2005/2006)
    1:28:16 – Disney – Mark Mancina & Dave Metzger (2006)
    1:31:44 – Studio Canal – Alexandre Desplat (2011)
    1:36:25 – Paramount – Michael Giacchino (2011)
    1:40:02 – Universal, updated – Brian Tyler (2012)
    1:41:26 – Marvel – Tyler/Giacchino (2013/2016)
    1:47:26 – Netflix – Lon Bender and Charlie Campagna (2015)
    1:52:49 – Streaming Star Wars (2019)
    1:56:31 – MGM (2021)
    1:58:33 – The Art of the Score fanfare – Nicholas Buc (2004)
    2:01:25 – “Name That Theme”, with your host, Andrew Pogson

    We love to hear from our listeners – get in touch via Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, and if you like The Art of the Score, please take a moment to subscribe, rate and comment.

    Episode 34: Studio Fanfares Part 1

    Episode 34: Studio Fanfares Part 1

    You’re sitting in a darkened movie theatre, and the latest, highly anticipated blockbuster is about to play. The ads are over, the trailers are all done, and the lights dim. What’s this? Why, it’s Art of the Score Episode 34, as we investigate a fascinating and often-overlooked area of film music history – studio fanfares. From 20th Century Fox to MGM’s Leo the Lion roar and many more, over the next two episodes we’ll be revealing the secrets behind the musical moments that open the movies and set the musical agenda, and telling the stories behind the studios and the composers who made them.

    Show notes:

    6:02 – The origins of the fanfare
    8:51 – The studio system and the sound of the Big Five
    12:15 – MGM: Lions, Stars, and Celebrities, oh my!
    15:31 – RKO: Morse code, crime, and Howard Hughes
    20:20 – Paramount Pictures on Parade (allegedly)
    21:28 – 20th Century Fox – Alfred Newman (1933)
    27:22 – Warner Brothers – Max Steiner (1937)
    33:05 – The Little Three (that’s Andrew, Nick, and Dan)
    33:33 – Universal Studios, Tchaikovsky, and Superman – Jimmy McHugh (1936)
    40:30 – United Artists (so united they didn’t have a fanfare)
    41:40 – Columbia – Mischa Bakaleinikoff (1934)
    43:21 – Beyond the Big Five and the Little Three
    44:33 – Selznick International – Alfred Newman (1936)
    47:30 – The Art of the Score fanfare – Thaddeus Buc (1935)
    49:54 – Into the 1950s: lawsuits, widescreens, and the birth of television
    52:07 – VistaVision – Nathan van Cleeve (1952)
    56:11 – CinemaScope – 20th Century Fox – Alfred Newman expands his fanfare (1954)
    1:01:39 – MGM – Leo the Lion (1957)
    1:02:34 – The Art of the Score fanfare – Jerry Buc (1960)
    1:04:38 – The emergence of television and the NBC chime
    1:07:44 – Desilu – Wilber Hatch (1966)
    1:10:52 – The Art of the Score fanfare – Teddy Buc (1970)
    1:15:48 – Paramount’s Parade – Lalo Schifrin (1970), Jerry Goldsmith (1976 and 1977)
    1:22:24 – Columbia – Suzanne Ciani (1976)
    1:24:48 – Walt Disney Productions - When You Wish Upon a Star (1972)
    1:32:04 – PBS – Paul Alan Levi (1971)
    1:33:18 – Associated Film Distribution (1978)

    Links mentioned:

    Yorgason and Lyon’s journal article on Max Steiner’s Warner Bros. fanfare - https://www.mtosmt.org/issues/mto.20.26.2/mto.20.26.2.yorgason_lyon.html
    Kirk Hamilton’s Strong Song’s episode on David Bowie – https://strongsongspodcast.com/episode/space-oddity-and-starman-by-david-bowie

    We love to hear from our listeners – get in touch via Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, and if you like The Art of the Score, please take a moment to subscribe, rate and comment.

    Episode 33: Arrival

    Episode 33: Arrival

    It’s finally time for Episode 33, and Art of the Score’s analysis of one of the landmark composers of the last decade: Jóhann Jóhannsson. We sit down with special guest, synth (and tape loop) expert Seja Vogel, and Jóhannsson’s soundtrack for Denis Villeneuve’s masterpiece sci fi film, Arrival. Join us for heptapods, looping seals (?), and the only true universal language: film music.

    Episode notes:

    4:41 – Arrival arrives, and Jóhannsson thrives
    12:47 – Around the Clock News
    15:43 – Arriving in Montana
    21:49 – Seja breaks down the Arrival sound
    30:05 – Looping with Seja
    34:45 – First Encounter
    39:12 – Sapir-Whorf
    43:00 – Hazmat
    49:42 – Heptapod B
    58:56 – Non-Zero-Sum Game
    1:02:21 – Deciphering
    1:06:26 – One of Twelve
    1:12:22 – Rise, and Max Richter’s On The Nature of Daylight

    We love to hear from our listeners – get in touch via Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, and if you like The Art of the Score, please take a moment to subscribe, rate and comment.

    Episode 32: The Mummy

    Episode 32: The Mummy

    It’s Episode 32, and we come back to you from the city of the lockdown with the crown jewel of 1990s action adventure: Jerry Goldsmith’s wonderful score for The Mummy. Goldsmith has for some time been one of Art of the Score’s most requested composers, so join us as we journey to 1920s Egypt and scheme among the pyramids with Brendan Fraser, Rachel Weisz, and that incredible music.

    Episode notes:

    5:05 – That’s Goldsmith, Jerry! Goldsmith!
    8:04 – Podcast recommendation: The Goldsmith Odyssey
    10:04 – The Universal history of the Mummy
    19:03 – Hamunaptra theme
    24:18 – A brief introduction to the film’s other themes
    26:58 – Hamun it up
    32:40 – Hamajor Hamontage
    36:58 – Jerry’s percussion
    39:11 – Imhotep’s motif
    44:21 – Nick comes clean about his bullying ways
    47:01 – The love theme
    52:20 – Luteish love and handy hand percussion
    56:41 – The power of French Horns propels you
    1:00:06 – A romantic finale
    1:05:12 – Rick’s theme
    1:12:27 – Here come the baddies
    1:15:47 – The Mummy Strut
    1:18:47 – A sourcey rag
    1:22:14 – The Musicians of the Nile
    1:27:26 – Hollywood’s sound of Egypt
    1:34:44 – Do camels have scales?
    1:38:21 – The key is octatonic
    1:46:13 – Frightening mummy
    1:53:52 – Imhotep’s death (or, that’s a wrap folks!)

    We love to hear from our listeners – get in touch via Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, and if you like The Art of the Score, please take a moment to subscribe, rate and comment.

    Episode 31: How To Train Your Dragon

    Episode 31: How To Train Your Dragon

    It’s Episode 31, and we’re swooping into the new year with one of the most widely loved family films – as well as the film score buff’s film score – in How To Train Your Dragon. John Powell’s soundtrack has been one of Art of the Score’s most-requested episodes over the years, so join us as we get under the hood of this contemporary classic and pick apart its many main melodies and old-fashioned sound.

    Episode notes:

    5:56 – How To Train Your Dreamworks
    8:41 – The John Powell Up
    12:31 – Nick leaves his wife for John Powell
    14:43 – The Friendship theme
    16:38 – Toothless’s theme
    19:56 – Bagging Bagpipes
    25:27 – Hammering Dulcimer
    32:43 – Tin whistle and bodhran
    35:26 – Let’s b (theme) friends
    39:42 – Powell-chords
    45:16 – Toothless in three
    49:10 – Toothless Face/Off
    51:05 – The Band with a Dragon Tattoo
    54:17 – The Berk theme
    59:47 – A point of pronunciation
    1:02:56 – Father and Son
    1:09:08 – The cavalry arrives
    1:12:33 – The Viking theme
    1:18:31 – How To Write A Dragon Melody
    1:24:21 – Dragon scales
    1:26:39 – Astrid’s theme
    1:35:56 – The Evolution of Powell’s style
    1:38:38 – Battle theme
    1:44:10 – Telling the Tail
    1:49:53 – John Powell’s best score?

    We love to hear from our listeners – get in touch via Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, and if you like The Art of the Score, please take a moment to subscribe, rate and comment.

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
490 Ratings

490 Ratings

gingerg99 ,

So fun and interesting!

I recently came across this podcast and I love it so much! The conversation is both entertaining and enlightening at the same time! So far I've listened to the ones about HP, Gladiator, and just finished the Vertigo one. Would LOVE more on Bernard Hermann! I live in Texas which can mean a long road trip to get to other places - I'm learning and being entertained while driving across the country! I like to watch the movie then listen to the podcast - so so good! Thank you all! Please come to Texas and do your thang here for us! Would love to hear you chat in person!!

GailRStarr ,

Welcome back!

We’re so happy you’re here

Gfirl1256 ,

SO HAPPY YOU’RE BACK

I’ve missed this podcast so much! So happy to see you back! 😁💕

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