25 episodes

Arthro-Pod is a podcast dedicated to examining insects through both a scientific and cultural lense

Arthro-Pod Jonathan Larson

    • Science
    • 4.7 ‚ÄĘ 49 Ratings

Arthro-Pod is a podcast dedicated to examining insects through both a scientific and cultural lense

    Arthro-Pod EP 129: Rocky mountain locust in 2023 with JoVonn Hill

    Arthro-Pod EP 129: Rocky mountain locust in 2023 with JoVonn Hill

     Welcome to the 2023 season of Arthro-Pod! In today's episode, we meet up with Dr. JoVonn Hill of Mississippi State and the Mississippi Entomological Museum to have our final word on Rocky Mountain locust. We've heard about their historical destruction, we've covered the biology of what happened on the plains all those years ago, and now we want to hear about the current era of research on this insect. Plus, JoVonn shares his story of how he got into entomology, how to become an orthopterist, and how the outreach mission of the Mississippi Entomological Museum works. Tune in! Show notes Check out the MSU Department here Learn more about the Mississippi Entomological Museum at this link Here's just a taste of JoVonn's work with grasshoppers in the Southeast! Check out all the cool things that Mississippi Bug Blues does for outreach Find JoVonn on Twitter @JoVonnH  Questions? Comments?  Follow the show on Twitter @Arthro_PodshowFollow the hosts on Twitter @bugmanjon, @JodyBugsmeUNL, and @MSkvarla36 Get the show through Apple Podcast, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcatching app!If you can spare a moment, we appreciate when you subscribe to the show on those apps or when you take time to leave a review! Subscribe to our feed on Feedburner!   This episode is freely available on archive.org and is licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ Beginning/ending theme: "There It Is" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0

    Arthro-Pod EP 128: Rocky Mountain Locust Book Club part 2

    Arthro-Pod EP 128: Rocky Mountain Locust Book Club part 2

      Welcome back to Arthro-Pod bug lovers! Today, we are finishing the year out with part of our book club, focused on "Locust" by Jeffrey Lockwood.  In part one, we talked about some of the historical sources and reactions to locust plagues. In part two, we'll be talking more about what locusts are, how they happen, and the mysterious demise of the rocky mountain locust. Join us, won't you? Questions? Comments?  Follow the show on Twitter @Arthro_PodshowFollow the hosts on Twitter @bugmanjon, @JodyBugsmeUNL, and @MSkvarla36 Get the show through Apple Podcast, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcatching app!If you can spare a moment, we appreciate when you subscribe to the show on those apps or when you take time to leave a review! Subscribe to our feed on Feedburner!   This episode is freely available on archive.org and is licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ Beginning/ending theme: "There It Is" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0

    Arthro-Pod 127: Arthro-Pod Book Club, "Locust" by Jeffrey Lockwood

    Arthro-Pod 127: Arthro-Pod Book Club, "Locust" by Jeffrey Lockwood

     Welcome back to Arthro-Pod bug lovers! Today, we are trying something new. As we conclude 2022, we decided to have a "book club" type approach to our next two episodes. One book that has been on our mind when considering a book club was "Locust" by Jeffrey Lockwood, of the University of Wyoming. We hope you will pick up the book or check it out from your local library and join us on an entomological history journey that concludes with an extinction cold case being solved in the chilly glaciers of Yellowstone National Park. Then, let us know what you think by tagging us on Twitter, @arthro_podshow or one of the hosts (@bugmanjon, @jodybugsmeUNL, @mskvarla36). But, for today, tune in and hear what we think! Check out "Locust" by Jeffrey Lockwood and let us know what you think! Show Notes Mental Floss article on Rocky mountain locust Latter Day Saints article on the pest Early Lockwood newspaper article on the topic The locust swarm of the late 1870s was devastating to white settlers taking over areas in the mid-plains of the United States Questions? Comments?  Follow the show on Twitter @Arthro_PodshowFollow the hosts on Twitter @bugmanjon, @JodyBugsmeUNL, and @MSkvarla36 Get the show through Apple Podcast, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcatching app!If you can spare a moment, we appreciate when you subscribe to the show on those apps or when you take time to leave a review! Subscribe to our feed on Feedburner!   This episode is freely available on archive.org and is licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ Beginning/ending theme: "There It Is" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0

    Arthro-Pod EP 126: Deer Keds with our own Michael Skvarla

    Arthro-Pod EP 126: Deer Keds with our own Michael Skvarla

    Today's episode is a special treat as we invite our very own, Michael Skvarla to swap his host hat for a guest's chair. For years, Jody has wanted to pick Mike's brain about deer keds, a topic both she and Jonathan know little about. Luckily, over the past few years, Mike has become something on an expert on the topic. Tune in to learn all about these ectoparasitic, wingless, and interesting flies and how they live, thrive, and survive (plus a little about when people run into them). It's us! Talking about deer keds!  Also wanted to give a big shoutout to Jody for winning an award for excellence in Extension for her efforts in Nebraska and around the country. We're very proud of her and her commitment to science communication and we hope you will drop her a note of congratulations!Show Notes  CONTENT WARNING: DEAD ANIMALS. All photographs by Michael Skvarla unless otherwise noted.  European deer ked (Lipoptena cervi). Mammal-feeding deer keds emerge with wings but shed them after landing on a host. Photo by Erika Machtinger, Penn State University.   European deer ked on a white-tailed deer. This ked has shed it's wings. The abdomen has expanded after it took a blood meal.  European deer ked on a white-tailed deer. European deer keds on the muzzle of an elk. This photo was not staged, the keds were just very abundant. Michael and Penn State Vector Ecology Lab personnel searching for deer keds on a white-tailed deer at deer processors across Pennsylvania. Photos by Erika Matchinger and Michael Skvarla, Penn State University.   We searched through literal piles of deer.    The easiest way to find deer keds on host is to part the hair in sequence like you're sifting through papers in a file folder. We found that the best way to do that quickly was using a louse comb. Fine forceps are then used to grab the ked before it "swims" back into the hair. Pennsylvania elk at the PA Game Commission elk check station. Deer keds will land on any cervid, including deer and elk. Elk season in Pennsylvania is earlier than deer rifle season, so gave us an opportunity to collect deer keds a few weeks earlier than usual. Neotropical deer keds on a white-tailed deer harvested in Tennessee. Similar to European deer keds in Pennsylvania, some deer in Tennessee were loaded with keds while others were comparatively clean. Example of a PA Parasite Hunters collection kit that was sent to hunters to collect ticks and deer keds from deer they harvested. To test if deer keds responded to common insect repellents such as DEET, we marked off sections on a sock, applied the repellent, put the sock over an arm, and allowed keds to freely climb from an arena up the sock. At the end of 5 minutes we scored if they crossed the repellent or not.   Questions? Comments?  Follow the show on Twitter @Arthro_PodshowFollow the hosts on Twitter @bugmanjon, @JodyBugsmeUNL, and @MSkvarla36 Get the show through Apple Podcast, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcatching app!If you can spare a moment, we appreciate when you subscribe to the show on those apps or when you take time to leave a review! Subscribe to our feed on Feedburner!   This episode is freely available on archive.org and is licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ Beginning/ending theme: "There It Is" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0

    Arthro-Pod EP 125: The Arthro-Pod Guide to Choosing a Grad School

    Arthro-Pod EP 125: The Arthro-Pod Guide to Choosing a Grad School

    Howdy bug lovers! Today's show is inspired by a listener request to talk about the different graduate entomology programs you can find here in the United States. We didn't want to rank programs necessarily, so we decided to talk about what we think is most important to think about when you are choosing a school to call home for a master's or doctoral degree.¬†Tune in to hear about how each of us ended up in our graduate programs, what to look for in a potential mentor, some of the pitfalls of grad school, and maybe some advice on how to stay sane while you study your favorite insects! Show NotesThere are rankings online that are aimed to help you see which entomology departments are the ‚Äúbest‚ÄĚ though but question if the data used to create these ranking is applicable to you and your success as a graduate student. Does a program with many faculty or high level of federal funding necessarily have a good graduate experience?¬∑¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†https://www.collegefactual.com/majors/biological-biomedical-sciences/zoology/entomology/rankings/top-ranked/¬∑¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†https://www.collegeraptor.com/Majors/Details/26.0702/Level/Masters-degree/State/All/Entomology/¬∑¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†https://www.universities.com/programs/entomology-degrees You can check out this link from the Entomological Society of America for a fairly exhaustive list of possible grad school programs in entomology¬† Questions? Comments?¬† Follow the show on Twitter¬†@Arthro_PodshowFollow the hosts on Twitter¬†@bugmanjon,¬†@JodyBugsmeUNL, and¬†@MSkvarla36 Get the show through¬†Apple Podcast,¬†Stitcher,¬†Spotify, or your favorite podcatching app!If you can spare a moment, we appreciate when you subscribe to the show on those apps or when you take time to leave a review! Subscribe to our feed on¬†Feedburner!¬†¬† This episode is freely available on archive.org and is licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0.¬†http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ Beginning/ending theme: "There It Is" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 T

    Arthro-Pod EP 124: Investigating Forensic Entomology with Krystal Hans

    Arthro-Pod EP 124: Investigating Forensic Entomology with Krystal Hans

      Welcome back to Arthro-Pod! Today's show features Dr. Krystal Hans of Purdue University. Dr. Hans is a forensic entomologist and she guides the gang through wriggly and wonderful world of using bugs to solve crime. Tune in to learn about how to get into forensics, how evidence is collected, and in what order the insects would colonize your body! Larval Chrysomya rufifaces, photo by Andrew Meeds Show Notes You can find Dr. Hans online in these spaces Lab website: https://ag.purdue.edu/department/entm/hans-lab/index.html Consulting Website: https://hansforensics.com Tik Tok: Forensic Entomology Instagram: hans_forensic_entomology Twitter: @KrystalHansLearn more about forensic entomology at these sitesNorth American Forensic Entomology Association Texas A&M forensic entomology write upEntomology Today articleAdult Chrysomya rufifaces, Photo by Andrew Meeds Questions? Comments?  Follow the show on Twitter @Arthro_PodshowFollow the hosts on Twitter @bugmanjon, @JodyBugsmeUNL, and @MSkvarla36 Get the show through Apple Podcast, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcatching app!If you can spare a moment, we appreciate when you subscribe to the show on those apps or when you take time to leave a review! Subscribe to our feed on Feedburner!   This episode is freely available on archive.org and is licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ Beginning/ending theme: "There It Is" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
49 Ratings

49 Ratings

songsofthecrawling ,

Lockwood's locusts in two parts

Thanks to the team for putting the time into this important book. When it came out in 2004 I read it and enjoyed it. But there were some things that didn't quite feel right. You all nailed it with your careful analyses. I like how you present three distinct divisions of intelectual labor! Thank you!

ISE_Codey ,

Informative and Entertaining!

I look forward to this podcast release! I‚Äôm particularly enjoying the Napoleon episodes right now, bringing an entomological context to history! I also loved the periodical cicada quiz bowl because I felt like I could ‚Äúplay along‚ÄĚ. Thank you to the hosts for producing this exceptional content~

ūüí©ecnaveanceanūüí© ,

AMAZING ENTOMOLOGY PODCAST

I have finally found a podcast that strikes my interest and my passion for Insects and Arthropoda! I am so glad this came out because I was getting very bored of other podcasts but then THIS came out and I was very happy! I listen to this constantly and enjoy it!

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