99 episodes

Our goal is simple—educate white people on black history.
#BHforWP is a multiethnic collective dedicated to loving black and brown people by educating, resourcing, and challenging white people to actively participate in racial justice. The highest calling of humanity is to love. Whether you know it or not, the racial disparities in our country hurt us. They train us to protect our advantages rather than love others, and that mentality reduces us.

New episodes will be released on the 1st and 3rd Wednesdays of each month.

Visit us at BlackHistoryForWhitePeople.com, and, for bonus content and the ability to vote for future topics, support us on Patreon at patreon.com/BlackHistoryForWhitePeople.

Check us out on Twitter @BHforWP and Instagram @BlackHistoryForWhitePeople or feel free to email us at BHforWP@gmail.com.

Black History for White People Black History for White People

    • History
    • 4.4 • 619 Ratings

Our goal is simple—educate white people on black history.
#BHforWP is a multiethnic collective dedicated to loving black and brown people by educating, resourcing, and challenging white people to actively participate in racial justice. The highest calling of humanity is to love. Whether you know it or not, the racial disparities in our country hurt us. They train us to protect our advantages rather than love others, and that mentality reduces us.

New episodes will be released on the 1st and 3rd Wednesdays of each month.

Visit us at BlackHistoryForWhitePeople.com, and, for bonus content and the ability to vote for future topics, support us on Patreon at patreon.com/BlackHistoryForWhitePeople.

Check us out on Twitter @BHforWP and Instagram @BlackHistoryForWhitePeople or feel free to email us at BHforWP@gmail.com.

    Hood Sensory

    Hood Sensory

    This episode features Katina Stone Butler and her son Jamie (aka Miztick) discussing their innovative product called Hood Sensory - a sensory-friendly hoodie designed for neurodivergent individuals.
    Follow Hood Sensory on Facebook, Instagram, TikTok, and YouTube
    Resources Mentioned:
    Hood Sensory websiteDenton Black Film FestivalKey Learnings:
    Neurodivergency refers to people who think, process, or experience the world differently from the majority - such as those with autism, ADHD, anxiety, etc.The hoodie is designed with features like weighted blanket pads, compression sleeves, fidget toys, and chewable silicone to meet different sensory needs discreetly.Hoodies have historically been associated with Black culture, from the Black Panthers to hip-hop, becoming both criminalized and a symbol of resistance.After Trayvon Martin's death, hoodies represented the need for Black youth to find comfort and self-soothing, especially heightened by the pandemic's isolation.The goal is to create an affordable, stylish product serving the Black community first while being accessible to anyone needing sensory accommodations.Having products designed for the most marginalized helps lift up and care for all people with similar needs.
    The show highlights the passion and care put into developing an innovative solution born from lived experiences within the Black community. Listeners are encouraged to visit the website, follow their social media, and consider purchasing to support this meaningful work.

    Visit us at blackhistoryforwhitepeople.com + supports us at patreon.com/blackhistoryforwhitepeople.
    Buy our book on Amazon!
    $5/month supports us at patreon.com/blackhistoryforwhitepeople.
    Check us out on Instagram @BlackHistoryForWhitePeople or freel free to email us at hello@blackhistoryforwhitepeople.com.


    Support this podcast at — https://redcircle.com/black-history-for-white-people/donations

    Advertising Inquiries: https://redcircle.com/brands

    Privacy & Opt-Out: https://redcircle.com/privacy

    • 49 min
    Black Midwives: Celebrating Legacy and Advancing Maternal Care with Cessilye Smith

    Black Midwives: Celebrating Legacy and Advancing Maternal Care with Cessilye Smith

    In light of Black Maternal Health Week, this episode revisits key issues in black maternal health with Cessilye Smith, exploring the historical and ongoing role of black midwives through her personal story and discussing the work of entities like Abide Women's Services to better black mothers and infants' health outcomes.
    Cessilye R. Smith, an inspiring maternal justice advocate, joins this episode with rich stories and insightful reflections on her work. She is the driving force behind Abide Women's Services, an organization dedicated to reducing disparities in black infant and maternal health outcomes. As a liberator, justice seeker, and mother, Cessilye is deeply connected to her heritage, tracing her roots to the resistance-driven Kru tribe of Liberia. Through Abide, she works tirelessly to ensure black women and their babies receive adequate and culturally respectful care during one of the most critical times of their lives.
    Key Takeaways:Black midwives have played a crucial and often uncredited role in birthing not only black but also white babies throughout history, birthing the nation as a whole.There's a sacred legacy in the resistance of colonization evident in black maternal lineage, vital to understanding the depth of black women's reproductive experiences.The celebration and amplification of the black midwifery tradition are crucial for advancing maternal care and combating disparities in black maternal health.Abide Women's Services is an exemplar of empowering and quality maternal care, focusing on community health and honoring the black maternal experience from pre-pregnancy to postpartum.Mental health for black women can be supported through culturally sensitive community gatherings, celebrating their life, and offering spaces for rest and collective healing.Notable Quotes:"Black women were catching everybody's babies, black, white, you know, and they brought their cultures, you know, their ancestral wisdom and knowledge." - Cessilye Smith"It's in my blood. So, yeah, that's how it ties into the work I do today." - Cessilye Smith, on her connection to the Kru tribe and its influence on her advocacy work."Reparations begin with birth because it begins with life and transitioning the next life forward." - Katina"We're saying no, we're going back to our roots and where we are going to heal from the beginning. From birth." - Cessilye Smith"Events like this address mental health. Being able to gather in a space curated specifically for black women is part of our mental health journey." - Cessilye SmithResources:Abide Women's Services official website: abidewomen.orgCecily Smith's presentation at the White HouseBlack Mamas Matter AllianceUpcoming event: Black Maternal Health Week event in partnership with The Fountain
    Visit us at blackhistoryforwhitepeople.com + supports us at patreon.com/blackhistoryforwhitepeople.
    Buy our book on Amazon!
    $5/month supports us at patreon.com/blackhistoryforwhitepeople.
    Check us out on Instagram @BlackHistoryForWhitePeople or freel free to email us at hello@blackhistoryforwhitepeople.com.


    Support this podcast at — https://redcircle.com/black-history-for-white-people/donations

    Advertising Inquiries: https://redcircle.com/brands

    Privacy & Opt-Out: https://redcircle.com/privacy

    • 1 hr 10 min
    RE-AIR Carter G. Woodson

    RE-AIR Carter G. Woodson

    We're re-airing our episode from last year that began Black History Month and hope that you use this month to learn more about our country.
    We explore the legacy of one of Black history’s most notable men, Carter G. Woodson. To celebrate Black History Month, we wanted to share the story of the person who literally created what we now know of as “Black History Month,” Carter G. Woodson.
    The Mis-Education of the Negro - Carter G. Woodson

    Visit us at blackhistoryforwhitepeople.com + supports us at patreon.com/blackhistoryforwhitepeople.
    Buy our book on Amazon!
    $5/month supports us at patreon.com/blackhistoryforwhitepeople.
    Check us out on Instagram @BlackHistoryForWhitePeople or freel free to email us at hello@blackhistoryforwhitepeople.com.


    Support this podcast at — https://redcircle.com/black-history-for-white-people/donations

    Advertising Inquiries: https://redcircle.com/brands

    Privacy & Opt-Out: https://redcircle.com/privacy

    • 55 min
    Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. - Part 1 (Replay)

    Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. - Part 1 (Replay)

    In honor of MLK Jr. Day, we are re-airing our episodes we recorded in 2021. This is part 1 of 2 on the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
    Visit us at blackhistoryforwhitepeople.com + support us at patreon.com/blackhistoryforwhitepeople.
    Buy our book on Amazon!
    $5/month supports us at patreon.com/blackhistoryforwhitepeople.
    Check us out on Twitter @BHforWP and Instagram @BlackHistoryForWhitePeople or feel free to email us at hello@blackhistoryforwhitepeople.com.


    Support this podcast at — https://redcircle.com/black-history-for-white-people/donations

    Advertising Inquiries: https://redcircle.com/brands

    Privacy & Opt-Out: https://redcircle.com/privacy

    • 41 min
    Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. - Part 2 (Replay)

    Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. - Part 2 (Replay)

    In honor of MLK Jr. Day, we are re-airing our episodes we recorded in 2021. This is part 2 of 2 on the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
    Visit us at blackhistoryforwhitepeople.com + support us at patreon.com/blackhistoryforwhitepeople.
    Buy our book on Amazon!
    $5/month supports us at patreon.com/blackhistoryforwhitepeople.
    Check us out on Twitter @BHforWP and Instagram @BlackHistoryForWhitePeople or freel free to email us at hello@blackhistoryforwhitepeople.com.


    Support this podcast at — https://redcircle.com/black-history-for-white-people/donations

    Advertising Inquiries: https://redcircle.com/brands

    Privacy & Opt-Out: https://redcircle.com/privacy

    • 45 min
    Black and Indigenous Solidarity with Lyla June

    Black and Indigenous Solidarity with Lyla June

    Two sisters from different cultural backgrounds discuss the beautiful ways in which Black and Indigenous struggles intersect and have the potential to strengthen one another. Lyla June, of the Diné (Navajo) Indigenous Nation and host of Nihizhi Podcast, speaks with Katina. They also have hard conversations about the tragic histories and contemporary ways these two demographics have not always supported each other. Ultimately the two sisters band together in renewed commitment to stand solidly together in their respective struggles for Black and Indigenous liberation.

    www.nihizhi.com
    www.BlackHistoryforWhitePeople.com
    www.KatinaStoneButler.com
    www.LylaJune.com


    Support this podcast at — https://redcircle.com/black-history-for-white-people/donations

    Advertising Inquiries: https://redcircle.com/brands

    Privacy & Opt-Out: https://redcircle.com/privacy

    • 1 hr 31 min

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5
619 Ratings

619 Ratings

Anderson Team ,

Mexican/Hispanic History

Hello, I recently came upon your podcast and love it. It’s very educational and also very moving. You three are all very special people with good hearts, so thank you for that. But, I would love to learn about Mexican and Hispanic culture as well. I noticed you did 4 podcasts about indigenous people, which I learned so much about. So thank you, again. But no one ever talks about Mexican history and how our land was taken or what happened to them during the slavery days. What roles they played, etc. Is this something you can do?

bhernke ,

Shock Shock

Propaganda…as expected.

kelly moye ,

Love this!!

I cannot get enough of this podcast!! I just love listening.

Top Podcasts In History

The Rest Is History
Goalhanger Podcasts
American Scandal
Wondery
American History Tellers
Wondery
The Lion and The Sun: A Modern History of Iran
Oriana Coburn
Throughline
NPR
Everything Everywhere Daily
Gary Arndt | Glassbox Media

You Might Also Like

Black History Year
PushBlack
Black History, For Real
Wondery
Code Switch
NPR
[REDACTED] History
Andre White
Intersectionality Matters!
African American Policy Forum
1619
The New York Times