123 episodes

Podcast by CAA

CAA Conversations CAA

    • Arts
    • 4.3 • 21 Ratings

Podcast by CAA

    Resourcing and Reconnecting: Thinking Through Trauma-Informed Pedagogy and the Visual Arts

    Resourcing and Reconnecting: Thinking Through Trauma-Informed Pedagogy and the Visual Arts

    This podcast is a two-part conversation between Anita Chari (Political Science, University of Oregon) and Kate Mondloch (Art History, University of Oregon). Episode 1 is an introduction to embodied and trauma-informed approaches for pedagogy, including practical resources for students, teachers, and administrators. Episode 2 will explore embodied and trauma-informed approaches as they relate to art historical and liberal arts pedagogy.

    Anita Chari, Associate Professor of Political Science, University of Oregon,  is a political theorist and somatic educator, and the co-founder of Embodying Your Curriculum, an organization that brings trauma-informed, embodied pedagogies to educators and health care practitioners. She has won multiple teaching awards for her innovative work to bring embodied, trauma-informed, social justice paradigms into higher education. At the University of Oregon she has taught for seven years as a faculty member in the Inside-Out prison education project, where she developed a pedagogical approach that facilitates social-emotional and embodied learning in the context of the unique learning environment of a correctional institution. Her interdisciplinary scholarly research explores the political significance of embodiment and mindfulness practices for our times. She is the author of A Political Economy of the Senses (Columbia University Press, 2015), and her research on embodied practices and political theory has appeared in venues including New Political Science, Philosophy and Social Criticism, Contemporary Political Theory, and Somatic Voices in Performance Research and Beyond (Routledge, 2020).

    Kate Mondloch is a professor of contemporary art history and theory in the Department of the History of Art and Architecture at the University of Oregon, where she holds a joint appointment as faculty-in-residence in the Clark Honors College. She writes and teaches about contemporary art spectatorship and embodiment, especially as both relate to new technologies. She is the author of Screens: Viewing Media Installation Art (Minnesota, 2010) and A Capsule Aesthetic: Feminist Materialisms in New Media Art (Minnesota, 2018). Her current book project, tentatively entitled Art of Attention, explores attention and body-mind awareness in art since 1950.

    • 38 min
    Anita Chari // Kate Mondloch // Resourcing and Reconnecting

    Anita Chari // Kate Mondloch // Resourcing and Reconnecting

    Resourcing and Reconnecting: Thinking Through Trauma-Informed Pedagogy and the Visual Arts

    This podcast is a two-part conversation between Anita Chari (Political Science, University of Oregon) and Kate Mondloch (Art History, University of Oregon). Episode 1 is an introduction to embodied and trauma-informed approaches for pedagogy, including practical resources for students, teachers, and administrators. Episode 2 will explore embodied and trauma-informed approaches as they relate to art historical and liberal arts pedagogy.

    Anita Chari, Associate Professor of Political Science, University of Oregon,  is a political theorist and somatic educator, and the co-founder of Embodying Your Curriculum, an organization that brings trauma-informed, embodied pedagogies to educators and health care practitioners. She has won multiple teaching awards for her innovative work to bring embodied, trauma-informed, social justice paradigms into higher education. At the University of Oregon she has taught for seven years as a faculty member in the Inside-Out prison education project, where she developed a pedagogical approach that facilitates social-emotional and embodied learning in the context of the unique learning environment of a correctional institution. Her interdisciplinary scholarly research explores the political significance of embodiment and mindfulness practices for our times. She is the author of A Political Economy of the Senses (Columbia University Press, 2015), and her research on embodied practices and political theory has appeared in venues including New Political Science, Philosophy and Social Criticism, Contemporary Political Theory, and Somatic Voices in Performance Research and Beyond (Routledge, 2020).  

    Kate Mondloch is a professor of contemporary art history and theory in the Department of the History of Art and Architecture at the University of Oregon, where she holds a joint appointment as faculty-in-residence in the Clark Honors College. She writes and teaches about contemporary art spectatorship and embodiment, especially as both relate to new technologies. She is the author of Screens: Viewing Media Installation Art (Minnesota, 2010) and A Capsule Aesthetic: Feminist Materialisms in New Media Art (Minnesota, 2018). Her current book project, tentatively entitled Art of Attention, explores attention and body-mind awareness in art since 1950.

    • 38 min
    Teaching Arts Entrepreneurship / Rachel Skaggs / Amy Whitaker / Jennifer A. Reis

    Teaching Arts Entrepreneurship / Rachel Skaggs / Amy Whitaker / Jennifer A. Reis

    Join Rachel Skaggs in conversation with Jennifer Reis and Amy Whitaker as they discuss approaches, successes, and hopes for arts entrepreneurship education. Their conversation covers the What, When, Why, and How of teaching collegiate arts entrepreneurship in hopes as serving as practical guidance for CAA members and other instructors who are interested in incorporating this into students’ program of study in the arts.

    Rachel Skaggs is the Lawrence and Isabel Barnett Assistant Professor of Arts Management at The Ohio State University. Rachel is a sociologist of culture and work whose research focuses on relational ecosystems in creative industries. Her recent research can be found in Poetics, Social Psychology Quarterly, and The Journal of Arts Management, Law, and Society. www.rachelskaggs.me

    Amy Whitaker is an Assistant Professor of Visual Arts Administration at New York University. A longtime teacher of business to artists, she is an interdisciplinary researcher who publishes in law, sociology, finance, entrepreneurship, and cultural policy. Her work proposing fractional equity in art received the 2021 Edith Penrose Award from the European Academy of Management. Her third book, Economics of Visual Art: Market Practice andMarket Resistance, was published in fall 2021 by Cambridge University Press.

    Jennifer A. Reis is a creative entrepreneur, practicing and teaching artist, and former gallery director who has over twenty-five years of experience in arts business, administration, and higher education.  Currently Assistant Professor of Arts Administration at UNC-Greensboro, her research and practice focuses on empowering creative entrepreneurs with the mindsets and skills to survive and thrive. A master facilitator for the Kauffman Foundation’s FastTrac Program, she also consults for community development, trade and cultural organizations including the Tamarack Foundation, Tremaine Foundation, ArtsGreensboro, Kentucky Arts Council, Surface Design Association, and Association for Creative Industries.

    • 1 hr 1 min
    Nancy Um // Aaron Hyman // Pepe Karmel // Dissertations, Schools, Advisers, and Jobs

    Nancy Um // Aaron Hyman // Pepe Karmel // Dissertations, Schools, Advisers, and Jobs

    Dissertations, Schools, Advisers, and Jobs: What the Numbers Tell Us about Art History

    In this conversation, Nancy Um, Pepe Karmel, and Aaron Hyman discuss how computational analysis of dissertation topics and job placements casts light on the state of art history. Their discussion summarizes and expands upon caa.review's ongoing series, "What do we know about the future of art history?", including essays by Um (August 18, 2020), Um and Emily Hagen (June 28, 2021), and Karmel (forthcoming). Um and Karmel delve into the merits and difficulties of learning to work with quantitative methods, the potential and pitfalls of data-driven claims, the responsibilities of art history doctoral programs to their students, and the complexities of data management. Referenced: “Just What Is It That Makes Contemporary Art So Different, So Appealing,” in Visual Resources, vol. 27, no. 4 (December 2011), pp. 318-329 (contribution to a special issue on “The Crisis in Art History,” edited by Patricia Mainardi): http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01973762.2011.622233

    Aaron M. Hyman is assistant professor of early modern art in the Department of the History of Art at Johns Hopkins University and author of the recent book Rubens in Repeat: The Logic of the Copy in Colonial Latin America (Getty Research Institute, 2021). He is also an editorial board member at caa.reviews.

    Nancy Um is Professor of Art History and Associate Dean for Faculty Development and Inclusion at Harpur College of Arts and Sciences, Binghamton University. She is the author of The Merchant Houses of Mocha: Trade and Architecture in an Indian Ocean Port (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2009) and Shipped but not Sold: Material Culture and the Social Protocols of Trade during Yemen’s Age of Coffee (Honolulu: University of Hawai’i Press, 2017).

    Pepe Karmel teaches in the Department of Art History, New York University. Karmel is the author of two books, Picasso and the Invention of Cubism (2003) and Abstract Art: A Global History (2020), and he has written widely on modern and contemporary art for museum catalogues, as well as the New York Times, Art in America, Brooklyn Rail, and other publications. He has curated or co-curated numerous exhibitions, including Robert Morris: Felt Works (Grey Art Gallery, New York, 1989), Jackson Pollock (MoMA, New York, 1998), and Dialogues with Picasso (Museo Picasso Málaga, 2020).

    • 50 min
    Emily Neumeier // Ozlem Yildiz // Nicole Emser Marcel // Podcasting In The Classroom

    Emily Neumeier // Ozlem Yildiz // Nicole Emser Marcel // Podcasting In The Classroom

    In this episode, Emily Neumeier is joined by Özlem Yıldız and Nicole Emser Marcel to discuss podcasting in the classroom, reflecting on the unique challenges and benefits of taking on a research project whose final product is geared for a more general audience—the wider public. They also offer some more practical advice and insights for listeners who are interested in using podcasting in their own pedagogy. The podcast series under discussion is forthcoming. The podcast series under discussion, titled Monument Biography, is now available, and you can listen to episodes at STELLA Radio: https://www.stellaonline.art/monument-bio

    Emily Neumeier is Assistant Professor of Islamic Art and Architecture at Temple University. She aims to encourage her students to explore emerging technologies in their own research and engage in public scholarship.

    Özlem Yıldız is a Ph.D. student in art history at Temple University in Philadelphia, focusing on cross-cultural exchanges in Ottoman and Safavid illustrated manuscripts from the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. She holds an MA in history of Islamic art from SOAS University of London, an MA in history and a BA in political sciences from Sabancı University in Istanbul.

    Nicole Emser Marcel studies modern and contemporary Caribbean art at Temple University in Philadelphia. Her research interests include iconoclasm, geography, feminist theory, and religion. She holds a M.A. in Art History from American University and a B.A. in History from Xavier University. She previously taught at IUPUI in Indianapolis and worked at the National Women’s History Museum in Washington, DC.

    • 32 min
    Martabel Wasserman // TJ Demos // Laurie Palmer // Being Together in Radical Ways

    Martabel Wasserman // TJ Demos // Laurie Palmer // Being Together in Radical Ways

    Professor T.J. Demos, Professor Laurie Palmer, and artist and curator Martabel Wasserman talk about art, pedagogy, and environmental justice. We discuss the formation of new networks of collaborative learning in and beyond the university. What can academia learn from activist pedagogies? Note: This conversation was recorded in autumn 2020.

    Martabel Wasserman is a scholar, artist, writer, and curator who has an interdisciplinary practice at the intersections of art, activism and academic research. She writes on the aesthetics of solidarity and feminist art and environmentalism, and she has curated numerous exhibitions. Her work has been exhibited at the University of California at Santa Cruz, Van Gallery in Los Angeles, and elsewhere.

    TJ Demos is Professor and Director of Graduate Studies in the Department of History of Art and Visual Culture at UC Santa Cruz. He is also the director of the Center for Creative Ecologies at UC Santa Cruz. He has published numerous articles and books, and his research focuses on modern and contemporary art and its politics, particularly amid the growing biopolitical conflicts around ecology and climate change. His most recent book is Beyond the World's End: Arts of Living at the Crossing which was just published by Duke last month.

    Laurie Palmer is Professor in the Department of Art at UC Santa Cruz. Her sculpture, installation, public art, and writing is often concerned with questions of materiality, collaboration, and social and environmental justice. Among her recent projects are the book In the Aura of a Hole: Exploring Sites of Material Extraction (published in 2014) and her work on the collaborative public project Chicago Torture Justice Memorials.

    • 47 min

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5
21 Ratings

21 Ratings

watertest ,

Authentic

So nice to hear real artists talking about their processes and teaching philosophy. Refreshing honesty.

zatopa ,

Audio quality matters

I want very much to listen to this podcast, but the recording quality is so bad that I can’t focus on what people are saying. It sounds like it was recorded on a cassette player hidden inside a lunchbox. I realize that this production is a labor of love by devoted, highly educated professionals who could be doing much less generous things with their time and talents. But please, can someone find a friend or grad student or somebody who can help these folks out with some recording and sound editing assistance?

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