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A collection of public lectures either given at, or by members of, the Faculty of Law, University of Cambridge.

Cambridge Law: Public Lectures from the Faculty of La‪w‬ Cambridge University

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    • 3.4 • 5 Ratings

A collection of public lectures either given at, or by members of, the Faculty of Law, University of Cambridge.

    It's the Law: Civil Law

    It's the Law: Civil Law

    A BBC World Service programme broadcast on 29 August 1991.

    What is Civil Law, and why does the legal system of ancient Rome still matter? This second of five programmes looks at how many countries' legal systems can trace part of their legal history back to Rome.

    Programme information is available at https://www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/play/p03m0hxr

    Provided courtesy of the BBC.

    • 28 min
    It's the Law: Common Law

    It's the Law: Common Law

    A BBC World Service programme broadcast on 19 August 1991.

    The history of common law in England and how it spread across the English-speaking world, adapting to local cultures. Plus, the development of the legal system, and questions arising from recent miscarriages of justice.

    In this first of five parts, speakers include Lord Denning, legal historian Professor John Baker and Sir Frederick Lawton.

    Programme information is available at https://www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/play/p03m0hx6

    Provided courtesy of the BBC.

    • 29 min
    ''Gone with the wind' - Organised crime and the geography of wind farms in Italy': Cambridge Socio-Legal Group webinar (audio)

    ''Gone with the wind' - Organised crime and the geography of wind farms in Italy': Cambridge Socio-Legal Group webinar (audio)

    Cambridge Socio-Legal Group webinar.

    Speaker: Davide Luca, Department of Land Economy, Cambridge University

    The adoption of low-carbon energy sources is considered as one of the key policies to tackle climate change and, to this aim, many European governments have been supporting the transition to renewable energy through subsidies. Growing anecdotal evidence suggests that the generosity of incentives has attracted the interests of corrupt politicians and criminal organisations, as the sector offer attractive opportunities for mafias to benefit from generous public grants and tax subsidies and to launder illegal money via legal business structures. Yet, no academic research has systematically explored the link between organised crime and the renewable energy sector at the local level. In ‘Gone with the wind’, Dr Davide Luca and Alessio Romarri aim to fill this gap. The analysis features innovative GIS data on the geo-location of wind farms across Italy and on the local presence of mafia groups. Preliminary findings confirm how, in mafia-ridden regions, local criminal presence is strongly associated with a higher likelihood of hosting at least a plant.

    The Cambridge Socio-Legal Group is an interdisciplinary discussion forum promoting debate on topical socio-legal issues and empirical research methodology. It is affiliated with several departments across the University, including the Faculty of Law, the Institute of Criminology, the Centre for Family Research and Physiology, Development & Neuroscience (PDN). The Group serves to bring together people from within Cambridge and farther afield from different disciplines, including Law, Criminology, POLIS, Sociology, Psychology, Psychiatry, PDN, Biology, Economics, History and Social Anthropology.

    For more information see: https://www.law.cam.ac.uk/researchfaculty-centres-networks-and-groups/cambridge-socio-legal-group

    This entry provides an audio source for iTunes.

    • 31 min
    • video
    ''Gone with the wind' - Organised crime and the geography of wind farms in Italy': Cambridge Socio-Legal Group webinar

    ''Gone with the wind' - Organised crime and the geography of wind farms in Italy': Cambridge Socio-Legal Group webinar

    Cambridge Socio-Legal Group webinar.

    Speaker: Davide Luca, Department of Land Economy, Cambridge University

    The adoption of low-carbon energy sources is considered as one of the key policies to tackle climate change and, to this aim, many European governments have been supporting the transition to renewable energy through subsidies. Growing anecdotal evidence suggests that the generosity of incentives has attracted the interests of corrupt politicians and criminal organisations, as the sector offer attractive opportunities for mafias to benefit from generous public grants and tax subsidies and to launder illegal money via legal business structures. Yet, no academic research has systematically explored the link between organised crime and the renewable energy sector at the local level. In ‘Gone with the wind’, Dr Davide Luca and Alessio Romarri aim to fill this gap. The analysis features innovative GIS data on the geo-location of wind farms across Italy and on the local presence of mafia groups. Preliminary findings confirm how, in mafia-ridden regions, local criminal presence is strongly associated with a higher likelihood of hosting at least a plant.

    The Cambridge Socio-Legal Group is an interdisciplinary discussion forum promoting debate on topical socio-legal issues and empirical research methodology. It is affiliated with several departments across the University, including the Faculty of Law, the Institute of Criminology, the Centre for Family Research and Physiology, Development & Neuroscience (PDN). The Group serves to bring together people from within Cambridge and farther afield from different disciplines, including Law, Criminology, POLIS, Sociology, Psychology, Psychiatry, PDN, Biology, Economics, History and Social Anthropology.

    For more information see: https://www.law.cam.ac.uk/researchfaculty-centres-networks-and-groups/cambridge-socio-legal-group

    • 31 min
    • video
    Cambridge Pro Bono Project Speaker Series: COVID-19 and Human Rights: The Stress Test

    Cambridge Pro Bono Project Speaker Series: COVID-19 and Human Rights: The Stress Test

    Speaker: Adam Wagner, Doughty Street Chambers

    The coronavirus pandemic has driven liberal democracies to forfeit individual liberties of citizens in benefit of the collective well-being of society, thereby giving new colours to fundamental debates long entrenched in the human rights movement worldwide. In the UK, the most relevant corollary of the current crisis for the domestic legal sphere is that the provisions of the Human Rights Act (1998), much attacked by conservative leaders in the past decade, will from now on be discussed in a new light. From anti-vaxxers' freedom of choice to the government's enactment of confusing laws and beyond, the human rights dimensions of the COVID-19 crisis are multiple and far-reaching.

    To discuss the most salient human rights aspects of the COVID-19 pandemic in the UK, the CPP has invited the leading human rights barrister Adam Wagner to participate in our new (virtual) Speaker Series. Adam Wagner is a member of Doughty Street Chambers and has been appointed as Specialist Adviser to the Joint Committee on Human Rights new Inquiry into the government’s Covid-19 response. He will be giving a talk for 40 minutes and the remaining 20 minutes of the webinar will be dedicated to Q&A.

    For more information about the Cambridge Pro Bono Project see: https://www.law.cam.ac.uk/cpp

    • 1 hr 8 min
    Cambridge Pro Bono Project Speaker Series: COVID-19 and Human Rights: The Stress Test (audio)

    Cambridge Pro Bono Project Speaker Series: COVID-19 and Human Rights: The Stress Test (audio)

    Speaker: Adam Wagner, Doughty Street Chambers

    The coronavirus pandemic has driven liberal democracies to forfeit individual liberties of citizens in benefit of the collective well-being of society, thereby giving new colours to fundamental debates long entrenched in the human rights movement worldwide. In the UK, the most relevant corollary of the current crisis for the domestic legal sphere is that the provisions of the Human Rights Act (1998), much attacked by conservative leaders in the past decade, will from now on be discussed in a new light. From anti-vaxxers' freedom of choice to the government's enactment of confusing laws and beyond, the human rights dimensions of the COVID-19 crisis are multiple and far-reaching.

    To discuss the most salient human rights aspects of the COVID-19 pandemic in the UK, the CPP has invited the leading human rights barrister Adam Wagner to participate in our new (virtual) Speaker Series. Adam Wagner is a member of Doughty Street Chambers and has been appointed as Specialist Adviser to the Joint Committee on Human Rights new Inquiry into the government’s Covid-19 response. He will be giving a talk for 40 minutes and the remaining 20 minutes of the webinar will be dedicated to Q&A.

    For more information about the Cambridge Pro Bono Project see: https://www.law.cam.ac.uk/cpp

    This entry provides an audio source for iTunes.

    • 1 hr 8 min

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