193 episodes

The Center for Court Innovation is a non-profit think tank based in New York that helps the justice system aid victims, reduce crime, and improve public trust in justice. Every day, the Center works with people who are making a difference on the ground--police chiefs testing new approaches to local crime, prosecutors experimenting with alternative sanctions, judges looking for new solutions to complex problems. NEW THINKING introduces listeners to the best and the brightest in the field: practitioners and academics who are spearheading meaningful justice reforms across the country and around the globe.

New Thinking, a Center for Court Innovation Podcast Center for Court Innovation

    • Non-Profit
    • 4.9, 38 Ratings

The Center for Court Innovation is a non-profit think tank based in New York that helps the justice system aid victims, reduce crime, and improve public trust in justice. Every day, the Center works with people who are making a difference on the ground--police chiefs testing new approaches to local crime, prosecutors experimenting with alternative sanctions, judges looking for new solutions to complex problems. NEW THINKING introduces listeners to the best and the brightest in the field: practitioners and academics who are spearheading meaningful justice reforms across the country and around the globe.

    Justice and the Virus: Racial Patterns

    Justice and the Virus: Racial Patterns

    The death of George Floyd after a white Minneapolis police officer pressed his knee to Floyd’s neck for close to nine minutes has triggered a wave of long-held anger and revulsion across the country. Vincent Southerland, the executive director of the Center on Race, Inequality, and the Law at NYU, compares Floyd’s death—in public, in … Continue reading Justice and the Virus: Racial Patterns →

    • 20 min
    Justice and the Virus with Rachel Barkow

    Justice and the Virus with Rachel Barkow

    With justice systems across the country scrambling to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic, there is a lot of talk about what justice is going to look like when the virus ends. But what has the response actually consisted of—especially from prisons and jails, which have emerged as epicenters of the virus—and is there any reason … Continue reading Justice and the Virus with Rachel Barkow →

    • 28 min
    Getting People Off Rikers Island in a Pandemic

    Getting People Off Rikers Island in a Pandemic

    The infection rate from COVID-19 in New York City’s Rikers Island jails is currently almost 30 times the rate for the U.S. as a whole. As the city struggled to get people out from behind bars—criticized both for moving too slowly, and for even contemplating releasing anyone early from a jail sentence—it turned to a … Continue reading Getting People Off Rikers Island in a Pandemic →

    • 26 min
    The Inequities of COVID-19: A Focus on Public Housing

    The Inequities of COVID-19: A Focus on Public Housing

    In cities across the United States, the effects of the coronavirus are not being experienced equally. Whether it’s infection rates, deaths, or job losses, people of low income and people of color are being hit hardest. In New York City, many of those effects are concentrated in communities where public housing is located. The Center … Continue reading The Inequities of COVID-19: A Focus on Public Housing →

    • 17 min
    Criminal Justice as Social Justice: Bruce Western

    Criminal Justice as Social Justice: Bruce Western

    Bruce Western’s book, Homeward: Life in the Year After Prison, is, as its title suggests, about the challenges confronting people re-entering society after a period behind bars. But it’s also inevitably about the deep harms of incarceration itself. And moving further backward still, it’s about the problems and life-histories that leave people vulnerable to the … Continue reading Criminal Justice as Social Justice: Bruce Western →

    • 34 min
    “One of These Days We Might Find Us Some Free”: Reginald Dwayne Betts

    “One of These Days We Might Find Us Some Free”: Reginald Dwayne Betts

    In 1996, 16-year-old Reginald Dwayne Betts was sentenced to nine years in prison for a carjacking. He spent much of that time reading, and eventually writing. After prison, he went to Yale Law School and published a memoir and three books of poems. But he’s still wrestling with what “after prison” means. This is a … Continue reading “One of These Days We Might Find Us Some Free”: Reginald Dwayne Betts →

    • 42 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
38 Ratings

38 Ratings

KaylaCK ,

Such an informative podcast

This is such a great podcast! Its content is in-depth, yet simplistic enough for all audiences to access and understand. Absolutely recommend if you’re interested in hearing from a diverse number of professionals on issues surrounding criminal justice reform both nationally and specific to New York City.

Resumeblank ,

Good for Law Students

I'm a 1L, and this podcast always gives me a lot to think about on the way to class.

Violetsyn ,

CCI is the best!

now I know I'm with the right company!! Continue to innovate the judicial system!!!

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