28 episodes

The Cite Black Women podcast is a bi-weekly program with a simple message: Cite Black Women. We have been producing knowledge since we blessed this earth. We theorize, we innovate, we revolutionize the world. We do not need mediators. We do not need interpreters. It's time to disrupt the canon. It's time to upturn the erasures of history. It's time to give credit where credit is due. This bi-weekly podcast features reflections and conversations about the politics and praxis of acknowledging and centering Black women’s ideas and intellectual contributions inside and outside of the academy through citation. Episodes feature conversations with Black women inside and outside of the academy who are actively engaged in radical citation as praxis, quotes and reflections on Black women's writing, conversations on weathering the storm of citational politics in the academy, decolonizing syllabi and more. For more information about our project follow us on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram @citeblackwomen and access our website at citeblackwomencollective.org #CiteBlackWomen

Producer and Host: Christen Smith
Co-producer: Michaela Machicote
Audio Engineer: Lydia Fortuna

Cite Black Women Podcast Christen Smith

    • Education
    • 5.0 • 85 Ratings

The Cite Black Women podcast is a bi-weekly program with a simple message: Cite Black Women. We have been producing knowledge since we blessed this earth. We theorize, we innovate, we revolutionize the world. We do not need mediators. We do not need interpreters. It's time to disrupt the canon. It's time to upturn the erasures of history. It's time to give credit where credit is due. This bi-weekly podcast features reflections and conversations about the politics and praxis of acknowledging and centering Black women’s ideas and intellectual contributions inside and outside of the academy through citation. Episodes feature conversations with Black women inside and outside of the academy who are actively engaged in radical citation as praxis, quotes and reflections on Black women's writing, conversations on weathering the storm of citational politics in the academy, decolonizing syllabi and more. For more information about our project follow us on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram @citeblackwomen and access our website at citeblackwomencollective.org #CiteBlackWomen

Producer and Host: Christen Smith
Co-producer: Michaela Machicote
Audio Engineer: Lydia Fortuna

    S2E14 - Nuestro Amor A La Vida Es Más Fuerte Que Nuestro Temor A La Muerte

    S2E14 - Nuestro Amor A La Vida Es Más Fuerte Que Nuestro Temor A La Muerte

    En el S2E14 del podcast Cite Black Women (Cita Mujeres Negrxs), Yineth Balanta Mina, Yannia Sofia Garzon Valencia y Alysia Mann Carey, se encuentran para conversar un poco sobre su vida y su activismo en torno al "Cuidado de la Vida" y las experiencias de re-existencia como mujeres negrxs.

    • 45 min
    Luchas de las Mujeres Negras en México S2E13

    Luchas de las Mujeres Negras en México S2E13

    En esta entrevista Yoalli Rodríguez, habla con Rosa María Castro lideresa y activista Afro-mexicana y con Itza Amanda Varela Huerta, profesora-investigadora del Colegio de México. Se hablan de temas sobre racismo en México, luchas de las mujeres negras en México, así como de su trabajo comunitario e intelectual. Además se habla sobre la demanda de reparación por parte del Estado mexicano. Esta conversación fue parte de la Conferencia de Contribuciones Intelectuales de Mujeres Negras a las Américas en Austin, TX, febrero de 2020.

    Rosa María Castro. Máster en administración, activista, luchadora social, feminista negra o afromexicana, docente de formación para y en el trabajo, consultora y cocinera tradicional por convicción y desde hace más de una década trabaja formalmente por los derechos, la igualdad y el empoderamiento emocional, intelectual, económico, sociocultural y político de las mujeres, comunidades negras, indígenas, la diversidad, todas, todes.

    Itza Amanda Varela Huerta. Profesora-investigadora en el Centro de Estudios de Género de El Colegio de México. Ha trabajado en el periódico mexicano La Jornada, en el Centro de Derechos Humanos Miguel Agustin Pro Juárez. Realizó una estancia posdoctoral en el CIESAS Pacífico sur (Oxaca). Investiga temas relacionados con los racismos, procesos políticos negros-afromexicanos, feminismos, estudios culturales y crítica Poscolonial.

    In this interview by Yoalli Rodríguez, Rosa María Castro, Afro-mexican leader and activist, and Itza Varela Huerta, professor from El Colegio de México, we talked about racism in Mexico, the struggles of Black women, and their community and intellectual work, as well as demands for reparations from the Mexican State.

    Rosa María Castro, Master´s degree in administration. Activist, social fighter, Black or Afro-mexican feminist, training teacher, consultant, and traditional cook by conviction. For more than a decade she was worked formally for rights, equality and emotional and intellectual, economic, cultural and political empowerment, of women, and Black and Indigenous communities. This conversation was recorded as part of the Black Women's Intellectual Contributions to the Americas Conference in Austin, TX February, 2020.

    Itza Amanda Varela Huerta. Professor at the Center of Gender Studies of El Colegio de México. She has worked for the Mexican newspaper La Jornada, at the Miguel Agustin Pro Juarez Human Rights Center. She did a postdoctoral position at CIESAS Pacífico Sur (Oaxaca). She researches issues related to racism, Black, Afro-Mexican political processes, feminisms, cultural studies, and Postcolonial criticisms.

    Meztli Yoalli Rodríguez Aguilera recently earned their PhD in Latin American Studies at The University of Texas at Austin. They will soon join Lake Forest College as an Assistant Professor in Anthropology and Latin American and Latinx Studies. They do research on issues related to environmental racism, mestizaje, and State violence in Mexico. They are a member of the Decolonial Feminist Network in Mexico.

    • 38 min
    S2E12: A Candid Dialogue About Black Women’s Knowledge Production and The Politics of Citation

    S2E12: A Candid Dialogue About Black Women’s Knowledge Production and The Politics of Citation

    This episode of Cite Black Women podcast features a candid dialogue about Black Women’s knowledge production and the politics of citation. On Friday, February 26th, 2021, scholars convened virtually at UC Berkeley. The lineup included CBW collective members Dr. Whitney N. L. Pirtle, Associate Professor of Sociology at UC Merced and Imani A. Wadud, PhD candidate in American Studies at the University of Kansas. The featured panelists were Derrika Hunt, Erin M. Kerrison, Frances Roberts-Gregory, Kerby Lynch, Nicole Denise Ramsey, and Reelaviolette Botts-Ward. Caleb Dawson organized the event and it was presented by the Black Graduate Student Association in collaboration with African American Student Development and The Office of Graduate Diversity. The conversation is both powerful and insightful, bringing together multiple points of Black feminist departure to creatively weave a series of alternative ethics, praxes, personal narratives, and radical philosophies around the urgency of Black citation and its future.

    • 1 hr 39 min
    S2E11: Dr. Koritha Mitchell on African American women, homemaking and citizenship

    S2E11: Dr. Koritha Mitchell on African American women, homemaking and citizenship

    In this episode, Cite Black Women podcast host, Christen A. Smith sits down with Koritha Mitchell a literary historian, cultural critic, and associate professor of English at Ohio State University. to discuss book. From Slave Cabins to the White House: Homemade Citizenship in African American Culture (August 2020, University of Illinois Press). In her most recent monologue, Mitchell illuminates the links between African American women's homemaking and citizenship in history and across literature.

    Koritha Mitchell is a literary historian, cultural critic, and associate professor of English at Ohio State University. She is author of Living with Lynching: African American Lynching Plays, Performance, and Citizenship, which won book awards from the American Theatre and Drama Society and from the Society for the Study of American Women Writers.  She is editor of the Broadview Edition of Frances Harper’s 1892 novel Iola Leroy, and her articles include “James Baldwin, Performance Theorist, Sings the Blues for Mister Charlie,” published by American Quarterly, and “Love in Action,” which appeared in Callaloo and draws parallels between lynching and violence against LGBTQ communities. Her second monograph, From Slave Cabins to the White House: Homemade Citizenship in African American Culture, was published in August 2020 by the University of Illinois Press. Her commentary has appeared in outlets such as CNN, Good Morning America, The Huffington Post, NBC News, PBS Newshour, and NPR's Morning Edition. You can find Dr. Mitchell’s full bio can be here: http://www.korithamitchell.com

    • 52 min
    S2E10 Black Feminist Physics: A Conversation with Chanda Prescod-Weinstein

    S2E10 Black Feminist Physics: A Conversation with Chanda Prescod-Weinstein

    In this episode Cite Black Women podcast host Christen Smith sits down with theoretical physicist and feminist theorist Dr. Chanda Prescod-Weinstein to discuss Black feminist physics, the intersections between the matrix of violence against Black women and science, her radical Black feminist upbringing and her forthcoming book, The Disordered Cosmos: A Journey Into Dark Matter, Spacetime, & Dreams Deferred (March 2021, Bold Type Books).

    Dr. Chanda Prescod-Weinstein (she/her) is an Assistant Professor of Physics and Core Faculty Member in Women’s Studies at the University of New Hampshire. She is also a columnist for New Scientist and Physics World. Her research in theoretical physics focuses on cosmology, neutron stars, and dark matter. Using ideas from both physics and astronomy, she responds to deep questions about how everything in the universe got to the be the way it is. She also does research in Black feminist science, technology, and society studies. Essence magazine recognized her as one of “15 Black Women Who Are Paving the Way in STEM and Breaking Barriers.” She has been profiled in several venues, including TechCrunch, Ms. Magazine, Huffington Post, Gizmodo, Nylon, and the African American Intellectual History Society’s Black Perspectives. A cofounder of the Particles for Justice movement, she has received the 2017 LGBT+ Physicists Acknowledgement of Excellence Award for her contributions to improving conditions for marginalized people in physics, as well as the 2021 American Physical Society Edward A. Bouchet Award for her contributions to particle cosmology. She divides her time between the New Hampshire Seacoast, and Cambridge, Massachusetts. You can find Dr. Prescod-Weinstein's full bio can be here: https://www.cprescodweinstein.com

    Follow Chanda Prescod-Weinstein @IBJIYONGI

    To order The Disordered Cosmos: https://www.boldtypebooks.com/titles/chanda-prescod-weinstein/the-disordered-cosmos/9781541724709/

    • 1 hr 11 min
    S2E9: Race, Technology and Abolition - A Conversation with Ruha Benjamin

    S2E9: Race, Technology and Abolition - A Conversation with Ruha Benjamin

    Race is coded into every aspect of our technological lives, from automatic soap dispensers to Zoom calls. In this episode, host Christen Smith sits down with Prof. Ruha Benjamin of Princeton University to her work on racial coding, how racism and technology work hand in hand, and what we can do to create abolitionist futures despite this racism.

    Ruha Benjamin is Associate Professor of African American Studies at Princeton University, author of the award-winning book Race After Technology: Abolitionist Tools for the New Jim Code (2019), and founding director of the Ida B. Wells Just Data Lab, which brings together students, activists, artists, and educators to develop a critical and creative approach to data justice. Ruha is also the author of People’s Science: Bodies and Rights on the Stem Cell Frontier (2013) and editor of Captivating Technology: Race, Technology, and Liberatory Imagination in Everyday Life (2019), among numerous other publications.

    Ruha Benjamin's website: https://www.ruhabenjamin.com
    Ida B. Wells Just Data Lab: https://www.thejustdatalab.com/about-the-lab

    • 40 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
85 Ratings

85 Ratings

MsMae85 ,

Black and Proud!

Thank you so much for your podcasts and work that you do! I always feel proud and validated as a Black woman after listening.

ShannonChandler1 ,

4 stars 🌟 because....

Someone’s heavy breathing and the numerous”um huhs” makes it hard to listen without taking a lot of breaks. To me bodily noises are uncomfortable to hear close up.
Otherwise great topics and flow of conversations.!

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