21 episodes

The Cite Black Women podcast is a bi-weekly program with a simple message: Cite Black Women. We have been producing knowledge since we blessed this earth. We theorize, we innovate, we revolutionize the world. We do not need mediators. We do not need interpreters. It's time to disrupt the canon. It's time to upturn the erasures of history. It's time to give credit where credit is due. This bi-weekly podcast features reflections and conversations about the politics and praxis of acknowledging and centering Black women’s ideas and intellectual contributions inside and outside of the academy through citation. Episodes feature conversations with Black women inside and outside of the academy who are actively engaged in radical citation as praxis, quotes and reflections on Black women's writing, conversations on weathering the storm of citational politics in the academy, decolonizing syllabi and more. For more information about our project follow us on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram @citeblackwomen and access our website at citeblackwomencollective.org #CiteBlackWomen

Producer and Host: Christen Smith
Co-producer: Michaela Machicote
Audio Engineer: Lydia Fortuna

Cite Black Women Podcast Christen Smith

    • Education
    • 5.0, 68 Ratings

The Cite Black Women podcast is a bi-weekly program with a simple message: Cite Black Women. We have been producing knowledge since we blessed this earth. We theorize, we innovate, we revolutionize the world. We do not need mediators. We do not need interpreters. It's time to disrupt the canon. It's time to upturn the erasures of history. It's time to give credit where credit is due. This bi-weekly podcast features reflections and conversations about the politics and praxis of acknowledging and centering Black women’s ideas and intellectual contributions inside and outside of the academy through citation. Episodes feature conversations with Black women inside and outside of the academy who are actively engaged in radical citation as praxis, quotes and reflections on Black women's writing, conversations on weathering the storm of citational politics in the academy, decolonizing syllabi and more. For more information about our project follow us on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram @citeblackwomen and access our website at citeblackwomencollective.org #CiteBlackWomen

Producer and Host: Christen Smith
Co-producer: Michaela Machicote
Audio Engineer: Lydia Fortuna

    S2E7: We Must Center Black Trans Women in This Struggle - Imara Jones

    S2E7: We Must Center Black Trans Women in This Struggle - Imara Jones

    In S2E7 of the Cite Black Women podcast Cite Black Women Collective member Erica Williams sits down with journalist, intersectional-news producer, and creator of TransLash, Imara Jones, to discuss her remarkable work celebrating Black trans women's lives, fighting for justice, and imagining a Black trans future.

    Bio: Imara Jones, whose work has won Emmy and Peabody Awards, is the creator of TransLash Media, a cross-platform journalism, personal storytelling and narrative project, which produces content to shift the current culture of hostility towards transgender people in the US. In 2019 she chaired the first-ever UN High Level Meeting on Gender Diversity with over 600 participants. Imara’s work as a host, on-air news analyst, and writer focuses on the full-range of social justice and equity issues. Imara has been featured regularly in The Guardian, The Nation, MSNBC, CNBC, NPR, Mic, Colorlines, and is a frequent guest host of the In The Thick podcast. Imara has held economic policy posts in the Clinton White House and communications positions at Viacom. Imara holds degrees from the London School of Economics and Columbia. Imara is currently a Soros Equality Fellow and on the board of the Anti-violence Project, and the New Pride Agenda. She goes by the pronouns she/her.

    Links:
    TransLash.org
    ImaraJones.com

    • 32 min
    S2E6: Juneteenth and the History of Black Emancipation Days in the U.S, Dr. Melissa Stuckey

    S2E6: Juneteenth and the History of Black Emancipation Days in the U.S, Dr. Melissa Stuckey

    In this episode of the Cite Black Women podcast, Dr. Christen Smith sits down with Dr. Melissa Stuckey to discuss the history of Black emancipation days in the United States, Juneteenth, and the special tone this year's commemoration takes in the wake of the murder of George Floyd. Dr. Stuckey discuss the special connections between George Floyd and Juneteenth in Emancipation Park in Houston, the tradition of Emancipation Days across the country, and why the history of our freedom celebrations has everything to do with our current moment.

    *Erratum! Please note In the podcast Dr. Stuckey mistakenly states that Watchnight Emancipation observation was 1863/1864. It should say 1862/1863.

    Dr. Melissa N. Stuckey is assistant professor of African American history at Elizabeth City State University (ECSU) in North Carolina. She is a specialist in early twentieth century black activism and is committed to engaging the public in important conversations about black freedom struggles in the United States.

    Dr. Stuckey is the author of several book chapters, journal, and magazine articles including “Boley, Indian Territory: Exercising Freedom in the All Black Town,” published in 2017 in the Journal of African American History and "Freedom on Her Own Terms: California M. Taylor and Black Womanhood in Boley, Oklahoma" (forthcoming in This Land is Herland: Gendered Activism in Oklahoma, 1870s to 2010s, edited by Sarah Eppler Janda and Patricia Loughlin, University of Oklahoma Press, 2020).

    Stuckey is currently completing her first book, entitled “All Men Up”: Seeking Freedom in the All-Black Town of Boley, Oklahoma, which interrogates the black freedom struggle in Oklahoma as it took shape in the state’s largest all-black town.

    Stuckey is also working on several public history projects. She has been awarded grants from the National Parks Service and the Institute for Museum and Library Services to rehabilitate a historic Rosenwald school on ECSU's campus and to preserve the history and legacy of these important African American institutions.

    In addition, she is a contributing historian on the NEH-funded “Free and Equal Project” in Beaufort, South Carolina, which is interpreting the story of Reconstruction for national and international audiences and is senior historical consultant to the Coltrane Group, a non-profit organization in Oklahoma committed to economic development and historic rehabilitation in the thirteen remaining historically black towns in that state.

    Melissa Stuckey earned her bachelor’s degree from Princeton University and her Ph.D. from Yale University

    • 59 min
    S2E5: Black Women and Health Equity: Spotlight on Black Maternal Health and COVID-19

    S2E5: Black Women and Health Equity: Spotlight on Black Maternal Health and COVID-19

    CBW Collective member Dr. Whitney Pirtle speaks with Dr. Monica McLemore about her career trajectory, moving from her long-time position as a clinical public health nurse to becoming a prominent researcher on Black maternal health and reproductive justice. They discuss the importance of centering and listening to Black women in reaching health equity, and why this matters especially in the current COVID-19 pandemic crises.

    Dr Monica McLemore, a tenured associate professor in the Family Health Care Nursing Department at the University of California, San Francisco, an affiliated scientist with Advancing New Standards in Reproductive Health, and a member of the Bixby Center for Global Reproductive Health.

    Dr. McLemore retired from clinical practice as a public health and staff nurse after a 28-year clinical nursing career. Her research is grounded in reproductive justice across the reproductive spectrum including abortion, birth, cancer risk, contraception, family planning, and healthy sexuality, pleasure, and consent.

    She has over 50 peer reviewed articles, OpEds and commentaries and her research has been cited in places including the Huffington Post, Lavender Health, a National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine report. AND three amicus briefs to the Supreme Court of the United States. She is an elected member of the governing council and chair-elect for Sexual and Reproductive Health (SRH) section of the American Public Health Association. She is recipient of numerous awards and was recently inducted into the American Academy of Nursing in October, 2019.

    Whitney Pirtle PhD is an Assistant Professor of Sociology and affiliated faculty in Critical Race and Ethnic Studies and Public Health at the University of California Merced. Her areas of expertise are in race and nation, racial/ethnic health disparities and equity, Black feminist sociology, and mixed methodologies. Pirtle oversees the Sociology of Health and Equity (SHE) Lab at UC Merced and is a Cite Black Women Collective member.

    • 1 hr 6 min
    S2E4: Experiences Embodied in Language and Flesh: Dr. Dora Santana

    S2E4: Experiences Embodied in Language and Flesh: Dr. Dora Santana

    In celebration of International Transgender Day of Visibility 2020, CBW Collective member Michaela Machicote talks with trans woman warrior, scholar, activist, artist, and story-teller, Dr. Dora Santana, about experiences embodied in language and flesh. Dr. Santana is an assistant professor of Gender Studies at John Jay College CUNY and holds a PhD in African and African Diaspora Studies by the University of Texas at Austin. Her work has been published in the Transgender Studies Quarterly – TSQ – The Issue of Blackness under the title “Transitionings and Returnings: Experiments with the Poetics of Transatlantic Water,” where she emphasizes the healing role of ancestral energies in the African Diaspora as an important embodied knowledge that guides black trans people in their path of resistant and transitioning across imposed limits of gender, geographies and the secular. She also published in TSQ Trans En Las Americas, whose title is "Mais Viva: Reassembling Transness, Blackness, and Feminism." She is currently working on her book, Trans Stellar Knot-works: Afro Diasporic Technologies, Transtopias, and Accessible Futures, where she centers the knowledge production by and on Black trans women in the Black Diaspora through a range of digital and embodied media, especially in Brazil, the U.S., and African countries such as Angola.

    • 28 min
    S2E3: A Black Women's History of the United States

    S2E3: A Black Women's History of the United States

    In this special Women's History Month episode Ph.D. student Tiana Wilson sits down with Drs. Daina Ramey Berry and Kali Nicole Gross to discuss their most recent book, A Black Women's History of the United States.

    Daina Ramey Berry holds the Oliver H. Radkey Regents Professorship of History and is a Fellow of Walter Prescott Webb Chair in History and the George W. Littlefield Professorship in American History at the University of Texas at Austin. She is also the Associate Dean of The Graduate School and director of the American Association of Universities PhD Education Initiative at UT Austin. Berry is the award-winning author and editor of six books and several scholarly articles including A Black Women’s History of the United States (with Kali Nicole Gross, Beacon, 2020); The Price for their Pound of Flesh: The Value of the Enslaved, from Womb to the Grave, in the Building of a Nation (Beacon, 2017); and Swing the Sickle for the Harvest is Ripe: Gender and Slavery in Antebellum Georgia (Illinois, 2007).

    Kali Nicole Gross is the Martin Luther King, Jr. Professor of History at Rutgers University–New Brunswick and she is the National Publications Director for the Association of Black Women Historians. Her expertise and opinion pieces have been featured in press outlets such as BBC News, Vanity Fair, TIME, HuffPo, The Root, and The Washington Post. She has appeared on venues such as ABC, NBC, NPR, and C-Span. Her award-winning books include Colored Amazons: Crime, Violence, and Black Women in the City of Brotherly Love, 1880–1910 (Duke University Press, 2006) and Hannah Mary Tabbs and the Disembodied Torso: A Tale of Race, Sex, and Violence in America (Oxford University Press, 2016). Her latest book, co-authored with Daina Ramey Berry, is A Black Women’s History of the United States (Beacon Press, 2020). Follow her on Twitter @KaliGrossPhD

    Tiana Wilson is a third-year doctoral student in the Department of History with a portfolio in Women and Gender Studies, here at UT-Austin. Her broader research interests include: Black Women’s Internationalism, Black Women’s Intellectual History, Women of Color Organizing, and Third World Feminism. More specifically, her dissertation explores women of color feminist movements in the U.S. from the 1960s to the present. At UT, she is the Graduate Research Assistant for the Institute for Historical Studies, coordinator of the New Work in Progress Series, and a research fellow for the Center for the Study of Race and Democracy.

    • 39 min
    S2E2: Uma Conversa com Dra. Sueli Carneiro

    S2E2: Uma Conversa com Dra. Sueli Carneiro

    Neste episódio especial para o Dia Internacional da Mulher/Dia Internacional de la Mujer, sentamos com a Dra. Sueli Carneiro, filósofa e fundadora do Geledés, Instituto da Mulher Negra do Brasil, para dialogar sobre a importância de enegrecer o feminismo, a problemática da mulher negra, e o futuro do feminismo. O podcast foi gravado durante o congresso Black Women’s Intellectual Contributions to the Americas: Perspectives from the Global South, na Universidade do Texas em Austin, 20-21 de fevereiro 2020.

    Sueli Carneiro é filósofa afro-brasileira, ativista anti-racista, e autora eminente sobre o feminismo negro no Brasil. Foi fundadora, em 1988, de Geledés Instituto da Mulher Negra, organização preeminente do feminismo negro e líder na luta contra o racismo e a discriminação de gênero no Brasil. Pouco depois de fundar Geledés, foi convidada para participar no Conselho Nacional da Condição Feminina em Brasília. Como parte de seu trabalho com Geledés, estabeleceu o programa de direitos humanos. Também fundou SOS Racismo, um programa que oferece conselhos legais de graça para vítimas da discriminação racial em São Paulo. Carneiro se formou em filosofia na Universidade de São Paulo e recebeu o doutorado em educação da mesma instituição. É ativista no movimento negro feminista brasileira desde o final da década 1970.

    Geledes: https://www.geledes.org.br
    Black Women’s Intellectual Contributions to the Americas: Perspectives from the Global South: https://sites.utexas.edu/lozanolongconference2020/

    • 47 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
68 Ratings

68 Ratings

MsMae85 ,

Black and Proud!

Thank you so much for your podcasts and work that you do! I always feel proud and validated as a Black woman after listening.

ShannonChandler1 ,

4 stars 🌟 because....

Someone’s heavy breathing and the numerous”um huhs” makes it hard to listen without taking a lot of breaks. To me bodily noises are uncomfortable to hear close up.
Otherwise great topics and flow of conversations.!

Top Podcasts In Education

Listeners Also Subscribed To