123 episodes

A podcast from the team at Heroku, exploring code, technology, tools, tips, and the life of the developer.

Code[ish‪]‬ Heroku

    • Technology
    • 4.7 • 18 Ratings

A podcast from the team at Heroku, exploring code, technology, tools, tips, and the life of the developer.

    110. Scaling a Bernie Meme

    110. Scaling a Bernie Meme

    This episode is a conversation led by Greg Nokes, a Product Manager with Salesforce, Dan Mehlman, a Director of Technical Architecture for Salesforce, Mike Rose, a Director of Technical Architecture for Salesforce, Jack Ziesing, a Technical Architect with Salesforce. They're interviewing Nick Sawhney, a college student who saw an opportunity to make his friends laugh and built something that grew beyond his wildest dreams. At the 2021 US Inauguration, a single shot of Bernie Sanders sitting in a chair captured the hearts of many on the Internet. People everywhere were photoshopping him in the unlikeliest of places. Nick utilized his Python skills and quickly built a Heroku app that would allow users to place Bernie anywhere in the world, by adding him to any image available on Google Street View.


    To say the app was a success was an understatement. Inundated by tweets and distracted by press requests, Nick couldn't devote the time needed to keep the app stable and operational. He sent out a desperate tweet for help, only to be picked up by no less than Dan and Michael, who recruited Jack to help Nick with his operational issues. They paired together in a number of ways, optimizing Jack's Python code, securing its authentication logic, and autoscaling dynos in order to handle the waves of traffic. All of these rapid changes allowed Nick to step back and engage with fans on where they'd like to take Bernie next.


    In addition to a newfound gratitude towards Heroku's team, Nick learned a few lessons from this experience. He was really humbled by the availability of the engineering community to donate their time and knowledge to help his issues. It's also inspired him to create videos to teach others how they can mitigate scaling issues in their architecture before it becomes a problem. He's also hoping to create some open source tools that to monitor things like server costs and availability issues for other small projects.

    109. Meditation for the Curious Skeptic

    109. Meditation for the Curious Skeptic

    Chris Castle, a developer advocate at Heroku, is joined in conversation with Andrew Lenards, a 20-year programming veteran and meditation coach. He believes that meditation is the practice of familiarizing one's mind with its various states.


    Concentration is the ability to place attention on something for as long as desired. Clarity is about identifying the sensory experiences in your body. Equanimity is about accepting the state of the world around you. In programming terms, mindfulness becomes a sort of monitoring and observability tool for our bodies.


    Andrew suggests that curious listeners focus their attention on sourcing materials from secular sources. As well,the benefits of meditation can only come after quite a bit of time. The inclination of most starting practitioners is to quit before investing to see the benefits. Even if you feel like you're doing it "wrong" or feeling your mind get distracted, the core tenant of the practice is to not judge yourself. This in turn will help bring about the calmness which meditation can offer.


    Links from this episode


    "The Mind Explained"
    Niksen is a methodology focusing on "doing nothing"
    Mindfulness-based Stress Reduction
    "The Art of Noticing"
    Search Inside Yourself
    “99% Invisible” podcast
    Meditation information on Andrew's site: lenards.us and Afternoon Idle - 15 min guided meditation via a YouTube live stream
    Breathe (iOS / Android), Headspace, Calm and Ten Percent Happier are just a few apps which can help your meditation practice

    108. Building Community with the Wicked CoolKit

    108. Building Community with the Wicked CoolKit

    Nowadays, the internet is so huge that it can be hard for people to find others who share their niche interests. But when they do find that rare kindred spirit, it can feel like a magical moment. Lynn Fisher and design agency &yet have been exploring ways to help people build community around their passions (which can sometimes be a little “weird”). The team launched a project called “Find Your Weirdos” that incorporates different tools, sites, and techniques for helping people connect with their fellow weirdos. Their project also helps companies connect with customers through niche interests.












    Inspired by the Weirdos project, the &yet team envisioned ways to help Heroku developers connect — and the Wicked CoolKit was born. The kit harkens back to the earlier days of the internet, when simple, fun web widgets and tools helped people connect without all the noise of today’s mega social platforms. The initial version of the kit offers a new take on a few nostalgic web widgets, including:



    Developer trading cards — Echoing the retro joy of collecting baseball cards or playing card-based games, this widget allows developers to create their own profile card. They can specify their personal bio, coding skills, niche interests, “feats of strength,” and more, and share it within an elegantly designed UI.

    Themed stickers — A perennial favorite, stickers are a colorful way to identify interests, such as baking or woodworking. Users can download stickers to use as they wish, or add a sticker to their trading card that links to other people’s cards that have the same sticker.

    Webring — Years ago, fans and friends would use a webring to share a collection of websites dedicated to a specific topic. The kit brings the old school webring into the modern context and allows people to easily share and access web resources.

    Hit counter — Everyone wants to know how many visitors came to their site. The old-fashioned hit counter is a fun way to track and display page visits. The higher the number, the more likely people will want to engage with the site (and the developer behind it).



    The Wicked CoolKit is fully open source and available to use.


    Links from this episode


    Lynnandtonic.com — Lynn’s personal website.
    wickedcoolkit.com — Home of the Wicked CoolKit
    Show, don’t tell — the story behind the Wicked CoolKit.
    Find.yourweirdos.com — a series of essays on how companies connect with customers through sharing mutual niche interests.
    Face.camp — an app that connects to Slack for people to capture and post animated gifs.
    Wegotchu.cards — digital cards that people can pass around and sign.

    I Was There: Stories of Production Incidents II

    I Was There: Stories of Production Incidents II

    Corey Martin leads the discussion with two developers about production incidents they were personally involved in. Their goal is to inform listeners on how they discovered these issues, how they resolved them, and what they learned along the way.


    Ifat Ribon is a Senior Developer at LaunchPad Lab, a web and mobile application development agency headquartered in Chicago. For one of their clients, they developed an application to assist with the scheduling of janitorial services. It was built with a fairly simple Ruby on Rails backend, leveraging Sidekiq to process background jobs. As part of its feature set, the app would send text messages to let employees know their schedule for the week; these schedules were assembled by querying the database several times, fetching frequencies and availabilities of workers. Unfortunately, a client noticed a discrepancy between how many notices were being sent out, versus how many jobs they knew they had: of the 400 jobs total, only 150 had notifications. It turned out that all of the available database connections were being exhausted--but that was only half of the issue. Sidekiq was attempting to process far too many jobs at once, and each of these jobs were responsible for connecting to the database, exhausting the available pool. The solution Ifat settled on was to reduce the number of parallel jobs processed while increasing the number of connections to the database. From this experience, she also learned the importance of understanding how all these different systems interconnect.


    Christopher Ostrowski is Chief Technology Officer at Dutchie an e-commerce platform for the cannabis industry. One Christmas Eve, while celebrating with his family, Chris began receiving pager notifications warning him about some sluggish API response times. Since it didn't really have any significant end user impact, he ignored it and went back to the festivities. As the night went on, the warnings became significant alerts, and he pulled together a response team with colleagues to figure out what was going on. By all accounts, the website was functioning, but curiously, the rate of orders began to drop off. Through some investigation, they realized what was going on. Customers' order numbers were assigned a random, non-sequential six digit numbers. Dutchie was about to track its one-millionth order, a huge milestone. Before any orders are created, though, the app generates a six digit number, and tries to create one that doesn't already exist. The database was constantly being hit, as less and less six digit numbers were available for use. The solution ended up being rather simple: the order number limit was increased to nine digits. Although they had monitoring in place, the data was set up as an aggregate reporting; even though the "create order" API was slow, all of the others were low, keeping the average within tolerable levels. Christopher's solution to avoid this in the future was to set up more groupings for "essential" API endpoints, to alert the team sooner for latency issues on core business functionality.


    Links from this episode


    LaunchPad Lab is a web and mobile application development agency
    Dutchie is an e-commerce platform for the cannabis industry

    107. How to Write Seriously Good Software

    107. How to Write Seriously Good Software

    Rick Newman is a Director of Engineering at Salesforce Heroku. He's joined by Marco Faella, a professor of advanced programming and author of "Seriously Good Software." In Marco's view, there are of course several ways ways to characterize "good" software. Excellent software that goes above and beyond correct functionality includes code that is readable, robust, and performant. Each of these have different importance, depending on context. Robust software, for example, includes addressing issues with scalability, but only if one expects the software to be in such a high availability environment.


    It's important to address these requirements from the beginning, when the software architecture is being mapped out. Marco gives the example of developing software for an external client. This client might know all the business logic and how it ought to function, but addressing the code's future evolution and maintenance are just as important, and whose responsibility lands squarely in the hands of the developer.


    It can also be worthwhile to make an investment in education, learning about algorithms, data access, and other key concepts in the world of computer science. Such a foundation would allow one to adapt to the changing conditions of programming, whether those are caused by new hardware or modifications in the languages themselves.


    Links from this episode


    "Seriously Good Software" is Marco's book on the subject of writing strong code -- get a 40% discount with the code podish19

    106. Growing a Self-Funded Company

    106. Growing a Self-Funded Company

    Host Greg Nokes is a distinguished technical architect with Heroku. His guests are Alli McGee, a product manager, and Lewis Buckley, a senior application engineer, from BiggerPockets. BiggerPockets was founded 16 years ago to educate non-professionals about real estate investing.


    As a self-funded company, it’s critical for BiggerPockets to create products that customers will pay for. One way they achieve this product/market fit is by building cross-functional teams that are user-focused. All product teams have a project manager, tech lead, and designer that work closely together. This design-led approach allows teams to collaborate with representation from users, technology, and design.


    As the PM on one of these teams, Alli lives at the intersection of what can we do for business, what can we do from a technology perspective, and what can we do for the user. She advocates for the customer, bringing knowledge of what customers want, what problems they are facing, and how they have interacted with prototypes in usability studies. Alli also advocates for the business to be sure products make money. Finally, Alli advocates for developers to make sure the project is technically feasible and won’t cause technical debt.


    Another way BiggerPockets creates market fit is by creating Minimum Lovable Products—the smallest cheapest thing they can build that people love. With their current product, BP Insights, Alli and Lewis used this strategy to create the first iteration of a product that provides insight into local real estate markets. They then tested the product with users, iterated, and slowly built out a more fully formed offering.


    For their tech stack, BiggerPockets is built on a Ruby on Rails monolith. While some in the industry say Ruby on Rails’ time is over, Lewis argues that it has been a great choice, as using a well-known stack has allowed them to worry less about the technology and focus more on building value for users. The BP Insights product was built on this monolith using a massive data set of nearly every property in the US. BiggerPockets imported the data to an Amazon S3 bucket and eventually copied the data to Amazon Redshift for querying.


    Links from this episode


    BiggerPockets

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
18 Ratings

18 Ratings

PeanutButterSandbox ,

Listened to a few episodes so far

It’s pretty enjoyable.

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Sound quality

Get a volume level balancer. Talk about more than ruby

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