41 min

DEI leader Peter Trevor Wilson, Author of The Equity Advantage, discusses the Chauvin verdict and shares his thoughts on what needs to happen next Here Comes Everyone

    • Management

Peter Trevor was a guest on the podcast shortly after the killing of George Floyd and he is joining me again to talk about his the recent Chauvin verdict.

We discuss his reaction to the verdict. He shares why though there is a lot of work to be done before we can achieve genuine inclusion, equity and justice in society he has faith that real progress is being made.  He points to the wide recognition that systemic change is needed, the engagement of so many people outside the Black community in the process, and the energy and commitment of young people,  as key sources of hope.

We also talk about how multiculturalism has to mean more than celebration - it has to mean standing up for one another.  

And we revisit Peter’s advocacy for looking to  African models of justice and those of Indigenous peoples here in Canada citing the example of  Mandela and others - Ubuntu.  This leads me to first to challenge Peter asking if we should forgive Chauvin (that’s not our job) and then to a discussion of the role of scapegoating.

While we cover a lot of ground - from Rodney King, to Barak Obama, Trump, from mental health to concepts of justice, to hope for the future, we plan another conversation soon where we will dig a bit deeper into how employers can grasp this moment to create greater equity within organizations.

You can contact Peter Trevor at his website at https://www.humanequityadvantage.com

Peter Trevor was a guest on the podcast shortly after the killing of George Floyd and he is joining me again to talk about his the recent Chauvin verdict.

We discuss his reaction to the verdict. He shares why though there is a lot of work to be done before we can achieve genuine inclusion, equity and justice in society he has faith that real progress is being made.  He points to the wide recognition that systemic change is needed, the engagement of so many people outside the Black community in the process, and the energy and commitment of young people,  as key sources of hope.

We also talk about how multiculturalism has to mean more than celebration - it has to mean standing up for one another.  

And we revisit Peter’s advocacy for looking to  African models of justice and those of Indigenous peoples here in Canada citing the example of  Mandela and others - Ubuntu.  This leads me to first to challenge Peter asking if we should forgive Chauvin (that’s not our job) and then to a discussion of the role of scapegoating.

While we cover a lot of ground - from Rodney King, to Barak Obama, Trump, from mental health to concepts of justice, to hope for the future, we plan another conversation soon where we will dig a bit deeper into how employers can grasp this moment to create greater equity within organizations.

You can contact Peter Trevor at his website at https://www.humanequityadvantage.com

41 min