75 episodes

Welcome to Detroit Stories — a bi-weekly podcast on a mission to boldly share the stories of the people and communities in southeast Michigan.

These are the stories that fascinate us and inspire us — they are the stories that we think everyone should know.

Tune in every other Friday for Detroit-centric interviews and timely, inspirational topics. Brought to you by Detroit Catholic.

Detroit Stories Detroit Catholic

    • News
    • 5.0 • 12 Ratings

Welcome to Detroit Stories — a bi-weekly podcast on a mission to boldly share the stories of the people and communities in southeast Michigan.

These are the stories that fascinate us and inspire us — they are the stories that we think everyone should know.

Tune in every other Friday for Detroit-centric interviews and timely, inspirational topics. Brought to you by Detroit Catholic.

    Young, Catholic and Living in the City

    Young, Catholic and Living in the City

    Young adult ministry isn't a one-size-fits-all solution; how Detroit parishes, ministries find success with elusive demographic
    (0:03) Czeena Kate, co-founder of the Catholic dating ministry Hot and Holy Hearts on Fire for Christ, talks about how the idea for the speed-dating ministry began in response to some of the “perils” of the dating scene for young adult Catholics.
    (1:52) The narrator discusses the topic of the episode — young adult ministry in the Archdiocese of Detroit, particularity in the city itself — and how ministries for this group have been woefully overlooked in past decades.
    (4:17) Beth Allison, director of parish mission and operations for St. Aloysius Parish in the heart of downtown Detroit, talks about how the parish has seen a demographic shift since young professionals began moving into the city within the past 10 years.
    (12:03) Not every parish, like St. Aloysius, is full of young adults in a transient stage in their life. At many parishes, young adults seem to get lost in a mix of ministries catering to people of all ages and states, including the elderly, established families and children’s ministries. Patrick Howard, young adult ministry coordinator for the Archdiocese of Detroit, explains the challenges.
    (16:09) Howard talks about how young adults seek connection with others, which means parishes and ministries must establish robust means of communication, from social media to websites where young adults can quickly and easily find information.
    (17:19) Howard reflects on the misperception that to attract young adults, parishes must mimic the culture and provide trendier liturgies and activities. Instead, he says, young adults seek the timeless truths of the Catholic faith and respond to solid catechesis and opportunities to engage in the sacraments.
    (20:57) Studies show young adults in today’s generation are experiencing record levels of loneliness, and Howard says this is where the Church has a golden opportunity to evangelize. He suggests parishes and dioceses feel hopeful about the future and seize the chance to provide a sense of belonging for this critical generation.
    Reporting by Daniel Meloy; narration and script by Casey McCorry; production by Ron Pangborn
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    Listen to ‘Detroit Stories’ on Apple Podcasts, YouTube or Spotify. Podcasts also will be posted biweekly on DetroitCatholic.com.

    • 25 min
    Msgr. Trapp's Legacy

    Msgr. Trapp's Legacy

    Parishioners, seminarians and friends recall impact of Detroit pastor, longtime spiritual director who left mark on generations
    (0:02) Rose Marshall, a lifelong parishioner and social media coordinator at St. Augustine and St. Monica Parish in Detroit, recalls a drive-through the parish organized during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic to lift the spirits of the parish’s pastor, Msgr. Daniel Trapp. Marshall and fellow parishioner Brian McCullough Jr. talk about what the parish meant to Msgr. Trapp — who died in January — and what he meant to them.
    (3:01) Other parishioners and friends, including Nick Waller and Karl Finkbeiner, a seminarian who was mentored by Msgr. Trapp, talk about the priest’s ubiquitous presence in the east-side Detroit neighborhood, and his welcoming nature to all whom he encountered.
    (6:21) Genevieve Kocourek, evangelization coordinator at the parish, and McCullough talk about Msgr. Trapp’s quiet, persistent approach to evangelization. McCullough, a Baptist convert to Catholicism, talks about how Msgr. Trapp influenced his own conversion.
    (10:20) Friends and parishioners recall how Msgr. Trapp looked out for the less fortunate in his neighborhood, including a warming shelter at the parish during the colder months. Kocourek talks about his solidarity with the city’s African-American community and his response to national tragedies impacting the Black community, including the deaths of George Floyd and Tyre Nichols.
    (16:36) Marshall relays how Msgr. Trapp became a father figure to her, counseling her as a young person and grieving with her when her grandmother passed away. Waller and McCullough remember Msgr. Trapp’s counsel when he was experiencing a difficult time in life.
    (23:46) Finkbeiner recalls Msgr. Trapp’s care and concern for him as a seminarian during spiritual direction. Danielle Center talks about how Msgr. Trapp’s encouragement helped her start a new ministry during a pivotal time.
    (27:07) Kocourek talks about Msgr. Trapp’s care and concern for parishioners during the COVID-19 pandemic.
    (29:40) The interviewees each remember Msgr. Trapp’s workmanlike attitude toward the priesthood. Without overdoing it, he had a knack for leading by example and showing Christ-like care and concern for each person he encountered.
    (33:12) The interview subjects react to Msgr. Trapp’s passing and reflect on how he’ll be remembered for generations.
    Reporting and script by Casey McCorry; narration by Leah Butalid; production by Ron Pangborn
    This episode of Detroit Stories is proudly sponsored by Catholic Charities of Southeast Michigan – the charitable arm of the Archdiocese of Detroit. Engage in the practice of the corporal works of mercy within your community! To begin your journey of involvement and compassion, visit CCSEM.org today and select “Get Involved.”
    Listen to ‘Detroit Stories’ on Apple Podcasts, YouTube or Spotify. Podcasts also will be posted biweekly on DetroitCatholic.com.

    • 39 min
    The ‘Wild West’ of College Sports Recruiting

    The ‘Wild West’ of College Sports Recruiting

    Student-athletes, coaches and ADs offer advice for navigating a complex process amidst a changing landscape for recruits
    (0:02) Sonny Wilson, a freshman on the University of Toledo’s basketball team, reflects on his recruitment in high school as a standout on the University of Detroit Jesuit High School’s squad. He offers advice for other young players going through the process.
    (3:51) The narrator talks about some of the ways in which high school and college sports recruiting has changed, including video highlight reels, transfer portals and NIL (“name, image and likeness”) deals before introducing several interviewees.
    (5:55) Dan Rohn, football coach and athletic director at De La Salle High School in Warren, laments the decline in multi-sport athletes at the high school level, which he believes can be attributed to increased pressure placed on athletes who have hopes of playing at the next level. Vic Michaels, director of the Catholic High School League, offers his thoughts on the subject.
    (9:19) Mike Watson, athletic director at Marian High School, talks about the impact of video — especially social media — on recruiting. Ava Brizard, a Marian graduate and standout volleyball player for North Carolina State University, talks about how video gave her increased opportunities to stand out.
    (14:30) Interviewees discuss the timing of the recruiting process, which begins as early as seventh grade for some athletes. In addition to those above, we hear from Brady Drogash, a De La Salle graduate and quarterback on the University of Cincinnati’s football team; Xavier Thomas, a Brother Rice graduate and University of Toledo basketball player; and Dalton Drogash, a junior on De La Salle’s football squad.
    (20:23) Athletes and coaches discuss preparing for the recruiting process, negotiations with interested schools, and how high school coaches and athletic directors can help students and their families navigate the process.
    (24:35) Interviewees discuss tips for finding and deciding on the right school, and the factors athletes and their families should consider in making their decisions.
    (30:00) Rohn, Watson and Michaels discuss the impact of NIL deals on the recruiting landscape.
    (32:49) Athletes offer their advice for other students going through the recruiting process, including pitfalls to watch out for, who to turn to for advice, and how to make the best impression possible.
    Reporting by Daniel Meloy; narration by Emily Mentock; script by Casey McCorry; production by Ron Pangborn
    This episode of Detroit Stories is proudly sponsored by Catholic Charities of Southeast Michigan – the charitable arm of the Archdiocese of Detroit. Engage in the practice of the corporal works of mercy within your community! To begin your journey of involvement and compassion, visit CCSEM.org today and select 'Get Involved'!
    Listen to ‘Detroit Stories’ on Apple Podcasts, YouTube or Spotify. Podcasts also will be posted biweekly on DetroitCatholic.com.

    • 37 min
    What Seminary Life is Really Like

    What Seminary Life is Really Like

    Thinking about the priesthood and nervous about the next steps? Three priests dispel myths about what it's really like in seminary
    (0:05) Fr. Jeremy Schupbach, 27, a newly ordained priest of the Archdiocese of Detroit serving at the Church of the Divine Child in Dearborn, talks about the moment he first heard the call to the priesthood from an early age. The narrator introduces the topic of the episode.
    (3:35) Fr. Schupbach talks about his first experience of life as a seminarian — a very human moment in which he found himself three hours late for orientation.
    (8:30) Fr. Schupbach talks about some of the misconceptions he had about seminary life, and how they were quickly dispelled when he moved into the dormitories of Sacred Heart Major Seminary.
    (10:45) Fr. Clint McDonnell, director of undergraduate seminarians at Sacred Heart, and Fr. Craig Giera, director of priestly vocations for the Archdiocese of Detroit, dispel the myth that seminary life is boring and monastic. Fr. Schupbach emphasizes the fun elements of life in communion with other seminarians, including Sacred Heart’s best-kept secret: a bar called O’Berg’s.
    (16:09) Fr. Schupbach addresses the sacrifices priests make when they’re ordained — particularly the sacrifice of marriage and children. He talks about how the seminary encourages seminarians to pray about and wrestle with these sacrifices, and how the life of priesthood is a gift unto itself.
    (19:12) Fr. Giera and Fr. McDonnell talk about the process of discernment that happens inside the seminary walls. Both priests emphasize that the seminary isn’t a place where men go only once they’re 100% sure they want to become priests, but a place to ask questions and receive answers. And sometimes the answer is that God isn’t calling a man.
    (25:12) All three men talk about how much they love the priesthood, and how seminary life prepared them to fulfill the calling they felt from God. They offer advice for listeners — particularly young men who think they might also be called to the seminary.
    Reporting and narration by Michael Stechschulte; script by Casey McCorry; production by Ron Pangborn
    The love of family is forever. A lasting gift of love is preplanning your final resting place. Preplanning your burial site brings comfort to those you love. It ensures that your wishes are met and that no financial burden or unnecessary stress remains for those you leave behind. Give yourself and those you love the gift of peace of mind. Speak with a family service advisor at Catholic Funeral and Cemetery Services today! Visit cfcsdetroit.org or call (734) 285-2155.
    Listen to ‘Detroit Stories’ on Apple Podcasts, YouTube or Spotify. Podcasts also will be posted biweekly on DetroitCatholic.com.

    • 32 min
    Team Rubicon

    Team Rubicon

    How a ragtag band of volunteers launched a global disaster relief organization after Haiti's devastating earthquake in 2010
    (0:04) Kelly Anne Ruda, a retired travel agent and teacher, unexpectedly becomes a valuable member of Team Rubicon, a veteran-led nonprofit assisting disaster-affected communities. Despite lacking typical disaster-relief skills, Kelly embraces the challenging work of hauling debris and using a chainsaw during her deployments, finding fulfillment in contributing to Team Rubicon's mission.
    (4:37) Initially started by military veterans in response to the 2010 earthquake that devastated Haiti, Team Rubicon grew from a small group led by Bro. Jim Boynton, SJ, to a global organization that includes diverse volunteers and provides disaster relief around the world.
    (9:33) Bro. Jim describes leading volunteers and medical professionals treating victims during the first hours and days after the earthquake, bandaging wounds and responding to overwhelming needs.
    (13:43) Seeing and treating so much pain, Bro. Jim talks about the need for volunteers to decompress and find fraternity among themselves. He describes his appreciation for the military veterans who lent their skills to the effort.
    (17:25) After the earthquake, word about the group’s efforts spread. Bro. Jim talks about where the name “Team Rubicon” came from, and how in the years after the earthquake, the effort to respond to natural disasters around the world quickly expanded.
    (24:33) Gary Gamble, a 62-year-old Marine Corps veteran, talks about his experiences since joining Team Rubicon after the flooding in the city of Detroit in 2021.
    (29:09) Kelly talks about the unity felt among members of Team Rubicon, whose grey shirts serve as a visible sign of their fraternity and common mission. Although the work is exhausting, she says, it’s an unmistakably rewarding experience to help those who’ve suffered regain their lives. She talks about what makes it all worth it.
    Reporting by Daniel Meloy; narration by Gabriella Patti; script by Casey McCorry; production by Ron Pangborn
    The love of family is forever. A lasting gift of love is preplanning your final resting place. Preplanning your burial site brings comfort to those you love. It ensures that your wishes are met and that no financial burden or unnecessary stress remains for those you leave behind. Give yourself and those you love the gift of peace of mind. Speak with a family service advisor at Catholic Funeral and Cemetery Services today! Visit cfcsdetroit.org or call (734) 285-2155.
    Listen to ‘Detroit Stories’ on Apple Podcasts, YouTube, or Spotify. Podcasts also will be posted biweekly on DetroitCatholic.com.

    • 35 min
    The Katarina Effect

    The Katarina Effect

    How a youth minister with an unyielding generosity and love for God continues to make an impact five years after her death
    (0:05) The narrator introduces the listening audience to Katarina Goitz, a bright, compassionate youth minister with a big heart for God, service to others and an unyielding desire to do the Lord’s will. Katarina’s life was tragically cut short on June 24, 2019, when she was killed in a car accident.
    (3:12) Dr. Henry Goitz and Dr. Lorraine Armstrong, Katarina’s parents, reflect on their daughter’s infectious generosity and compassion. They give examples of Katarina’s selfless nature, including giving the shoes off her feet to a person in need.
    (5:55) A recording is played from a podcast in which Katarina was interviewed in 2017, speaking about her desire to make an impact as a youth minister.
    (8:53) Katarina’s parents describe her personality as a young child, and how from an early age she was always thinking of others. They talk about a gesture she made during her first Communion, asking guests to donate to charity instead of for her own benefit.
    (12:09) Katarina’s career discernment took many twists and turns. Her parents describe her desire for pastoral work, and how during college she volunteered doing service work in poor areas around the United States. She eventually enrolled in ECHO, a graduate program through the University of Notre Dame, and took a job as a youth minister in Galveston, Texas.
    (17:19) Katarina’s parents describe how even in the days leading up to her passing, Katarina continued to make a difference in the lives of others, in both deed and in prayer. To keep Katarina’s memory and legacy alive, Henry and Lorraine formed the Katarina Goitz Foundation, providing grassroots support and funding for youth ministers to provide opportunities for more young people.
    (23:58) Sergio Cortes, a friend of Katarina’s and a fellow ECHO graduate, speaks about how his youth group benefitted from the foundation.
    (27:17) Henry and Lorraine talk about Katarina’s enduring legacy, and how her example of faith helped them navigate the years following her death — including allowing them the grace and strength to forgive the man who was responsible. They read a letter one of Katarina’s youth group participants wrote about the difference she made in her life.
    Reporting and script by Gabriella Patti; narration and production by Ron Pangborn
    Thinking about the probability of dying is something that none of us wants to face. No matter what we do, all of us will pass away one day. Preparing now is a great way to help our loved ones during their grieving process and ensure our final wishes are followed. Our caring friends at the Catholic Funeral and Cemetery Services can help you. Visit Cfcsdetroit.org or call (734) 285-2155.
    Listen to ‘Detroit Stories’ on Apple Podcasts or Spotify. Podcasts also will be posted biweekly on DetroitCatholic.com.

    • 31 min

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