26 episodes

In each episode of this show from David Zwirner, the gallery pairs artists and creative people to discuss art and their process for making things. Featuring major figures from the worlds of art, architecture, music, and beyond–Jeff Koons to Vija Celmins, Jeremy O. Harris to Hilton Als–in open-ended conversation.

Dialogues: The David Zwirner Podcast David Zwirner

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.9, 174 Ratings

In each episode of this show from David Zwirner, the gallery pairs artists and creative people to discuss art and their process for making things. Featuring major figures from the worlds of art, architecture, music, and beyond–Jeff Koons to Vija Celmins, Jeremy O. Harris to Hilton Als–in open-ended conversation.

    R. Crumb and Art Spiegelman

    R. Crumb and Art Spiegelman

    Two icons of the comics world—and old friends—tell their cartoonist origin stories, from the psychedelics-fueled breakthroughs of the 1960s to finding their singular styles and the generational divide among the comics cognoscenti today. R. Crumb is one of the founding fathers of the alternative comics movement, and Art Spiegelman is equally influential, having authored the Pulitzer Prize-winning graphic novel Maus. 

    • 29 min
    Patrick Staff and Julie Tolentino

    Patrick Staff and Julie Tolentino

    A conversation between two dynamic artists and good friends, Patrick Staff and Julie Tolentino, whose work feels especially urgent now. Staff, who recently had a solo exhibition at the Serpentine Galleries in London, uses video and other mediums to comment on body politics from a queer and trans perspective. Tolentino also addresses issues facing marginalized groups, through performance that combines her dance background with social exchange. Always integral to their practices, these concerns are only heightened in the current moment. Here, they discuss contagion, toxicity, anxiety, the “leaky body,” and art during the pandemic. 

    Patrick Staff’s work is currently on view as part of Platform: Los Angeles, an online exhibition featuring thirteen Los Angeles-based galleries hosted on David Zwirner Online. You can learn more about Julie Tolentino’s work via the gallery Commonwealth and Council. 

    • 36 min
    To Venice and Rome

    To Venice and Rome

    A conversation with the acclaimed poet and New Yorker writer Cynthia Zarin that transports us to two of her favorite cities, Venice and Rome, in a celebration of Italy as the country begins to loosen the longest coronavirus-related lockdown in Europe. The episode features evocative readings from her forthcoming book,Two Cities, which captures the meditative yet constantly surprising nature of travel from a deeply personal point of view. 
    Learn more about Two Cities here. 

    • 26 min
    Diana Thater and Rachel Rose

    Diana Thater and Rachel Rose

    Artists Diana Thater, a leading pioneer of video and installation and major figure in the L.A. art community since the early 1990s, and Rachel Rose, a defining new voice of the medium, discuss the rapid evolution of video art and its limitless possibilities—including, for both of them, its ability to reckon with personal trauma and threats to the environment.

    • 39 min
    Minimalism Today

    Minimalism Today

    A timely conversation with the art critic Kyle Chayka, author of The Longing for Less: Living with Minimalism, on how minimalism went from radical 1960s art movement to, ironically, a hyper-commercialized lifestyle adopted by luxury brands and millennials everywhere—and where Marie Kondo and Agnes Martin overlap, if at all. 

    During this time, we’re evolving to give you even more to listen to, with one-on-one episodes with the people—and on the subjects—we find compelling now. Please stay tuned.

    You can buy Chayka’s book here. 

    • 28 min
    Antwaun Sargent and Tyler Mitchell

    Antwaun Sargent and Tyler Mitchell

    Photographer Tyler Mitchell and critic/curator Antwaun Sargent on the radical power shift from gatekeepers to artists, the breakdown of barriers between fashion and art photography, cautionary tales of social media groupthink and overexposure, and historical artists who made the new black vanguard possible.

    • 44 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
174 Ratings

174 Ratings

Darkened Space ,

Transported to Venice by Cynthia Zarin

I so enjoyed listening to Cynthia Zarin read from her upcoming book,Two Cities, in which she shares her longstanding relationships with Rome and Venice. My husband and I returned to Venice this past December to spend New Year's, just before Covid-19 stopped life there (and everywhere) in its tracks. We had not visited since the late ‘80’s, although we loved our time there very much and often wondered how it was that we hadn’t returned sooner. Being New Yorkers, we typically walk miles a day without noticing, and Ms. Zarin mentioned how she loves nothing better in Venice than to walk all day long. She brought back that wonderful feeling of walking in any direction there from breakfast till sunset, learning to welcome getting lost a number of times a day, when, for example, a map didn’t match a four-foot wide Venetian pathway we took, or led to a walled dead end the map showed going through. Ms. Zarin might agree that the discoveries found quite by accident walking this way made for some of the most memorable stories. She described her Venetian experiences so intimately that I was drawn back in memory to revisit moments I similarly cherished. Like breathing in, through the city's crisp, January air, fragrances of fresh bread baking in a pasticceria we walked passed, or spices emanating from open doors of a salumeria. Fewer tourists crowded the ambling, narrow, stone streets and wooden bridges when we were there, but street life bustled so vibrantly I couldn't imagine the overcrowding we heard about from shopkeepers, who complained to us about cruise ships coming and going in summer. As Ms. Zarin read to us about her journey using a water taxi, I recalled that quarter-mile jaunt at the port she spoke of, schlepping our bags down that odd, red runway to our own water taxi five months ago. That ride to a palazzo that friends had rented on the Grand Canal and to which, very last minute, they spontaneously invited us, was late at night, and entering onto that fabled waterway was like floating through the most incredible movie set ever built. Ms. Zarin called the Canal both beautiful and absurd. She’s exactly right. She also wrote that she would have been warmer in the taxi’s cabin, but felt the need to stay outside in bracing wind to see it all. Me too. Thank you, Ms. Zarin, for taking me back. I can’t wait to read Two Cities, and hope we’ll both, and all, return to Italy in person soon. A presto!

jacksonp92 ,

Mamma and Jockum

Gives me life! Wish I could listen to them speak for longer.

stay home-do art ,

Mamma & Jockum

Wonderful-a real conversation about working as an artist.
No gobbledygook! Loved it!

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