186 episodes

From breaking news and insider insights to exhibitions and events around the world, the team at The Art Newspaper picks apart the art world's big stories with the help of special guests. An award-winning podcast hosted by Ben Luke, The Week in Art is sponsored by Christie's.
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The Week in Art The Art Newspaper

    • Arts
    • 4.5 • 108 Ratings

From breaking news and insider insights to exhibitions and events around the world, the team at The Art Newspaper picks apart the art world's big stories with the help of special guests. An award-winning podcast hosted by Ben Luke, The Week in Art is sponsored by Christie's.
See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Uyghurs: human rights abuses in China; Van Gogh's final months and death; master printer Kenneth Tyler on Helen Frankenthaler

    Uyghurs: human rights abuses in China; Van Gogh's final months and death; master printer Kenneth Tyler on Helen Frankenthaler

    This week: as a tribunal in London hears of human rights atrocities against the Uyghur community and other Muslim groups in China, how will museums, galleries and other cultural institutions working with government-supported institutions in China respond? We talk to The Art Newspaper’s editor-at-large Cristina Ruiz, who has heard many hours of disturbing evidence at the tribunal, and to Sir Geoffrey Nice, the tribunal’s chair.
    Also, this week, Martin Bailey tells us about his latest book, Van Gogh's Finale, looking at his final months, his death and his legacy. And in this episode’s Work of the Week, we talk to Kenneth Tyler, the master-printmaker who has collaborated on some of the great prints of the post-war era, about his collaboration on a group of six woodcuts by Helen Frankenthaler, The Tales of Genji (1998), now on view in an exhibition at the Dulwich Picture Gallery in London.


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    • 1 hr 13 min
    Painting special: artists Doron Langberg, Mohammed Sami and Vivien Zhang, art advisor Lisa Schiff, Vermeer’s cupid

    Painting special: artists Doron Langberg, Mohammed Sami and Vivien Zhang, art advisor Lisa Schiff, Vermeer’s cupid

    As a huge survey of contemporary painting opens at the Hayward Gallery in London, we ask: is the time-honoured medium of painting the art form best suited to exploring the complexity of our age?
    We look at the thriving and diverse contemporary painting scene in the UK and explore the Hayward director Ralph Rugoff’s suggestion that this ancient medium “seems like the best technology there could possibly be for reflecting on what it's like to live in a culture where image is the primary currency it is”. We talk to two emerging artists in that show: Baghdad-born Mohammed Sami and Beijing-born Vivien Zhang, who are both based in London. We meet Doron Langberg, the Brooklyn-based painter, and discuss his latest work reflecting on queer desire and identity and landscape as a space of mourning. And we ask art advisor Lisa Schiff, founder of SFA advisory, about paintings and collectors.
    And in this episode’s Work of the Week, we explore a newly restored canvas by one of the greatest of all painters, Johannes Vermeer—Girl Reading a Letter at an Open Window (around 1657-59) has just been unveiled in its full glory for the first time in centuries at Dresden’s Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister, fully revealing a hidden image of Cupid, painted by Vermeer but painted over by someone else. And we hear about new research on the painting. Plus, the latest big stories in the world of art and heritage.

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    • 1 hr 7 min
    Afghanistan: the threat to its artists and heritage. Plus, artist Bill Fontana records Notre Dame's bells

    Afghanistan: the threat to its artists and heritage. Plus, artist Bill Fontana records Notre Dame's bells

    We're back with a new season of The Week in Art, which takes us right up to the holidays.
    In this episode, we reflect on events in Afghanistan in recent weeks. We hear from an anthropologist and an Afghan artist about the country's people, art and heritage as the Taliban assume power again. Melissa Chiovenda, an assistant professor of anthropology at Zayed University in Abu Dhabi, discusses the sixth-century Bamiyan Buddhas that were destroyed by the Taliban in 2001 in the context of the Hazara people that live in Bamiyan city and province, and reflects on what the return to power of the Taliban means for that community. The artist Yama Rahimi addresses the implications for artists in Afghanistan and reflects on the contemporary art scene there over recent years. He also talks about the situation facing those people, including artists, that are able to leave Afghanistan and seek asylum in the West—a situation whose complexities he is familiar with as an asylum-seeker living in Germany.
    We also hear about a work being made in Notre Dame in Paris by the sound artist Bill Fontana, who is recording the cathedral's bells as they resonate to the sounds of the city. Fontana's project is the first to be made in Notre-Dame since the catastrophic fire in 2019.

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    • 57 min
    Great women in art history make a comeback: the New Woman at the Met and Aware in Paris

    Great women in art history make a comeback: the New Woman at the Met and Aware in Paris

    It's an all-woman line-up on this week's podcast. Nancy Kenney speaks to Andrea Nelson, the curator of The New Woman Behind the Camera, an exhibition opening at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York and touring later to the National Gallery of Art in Washington. Aimee Dawson talks to Camille Morineau, a former Centre Pompidou curator, about the Archives of Women Artists, Research and Exhibitions (Aware), an organisation she founded in order to rewrite art history from a more gender-equal perspective. And in this week’s Work of the Week, Helen Stoilas interviews Orin Zahra, a curator at the National Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington, DC, about a group of photographs in the series SHE (2019) by Rania Matar.
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    • 1 hr 4 min
    Activists protest Shell museum sponsorship. Plus, artists Michael Landy and Shahzia Sikander

    Activists protest Shell museum sponsorship. Plus, artists Michael Landy and Shahzia Sikander

    This week: should the Science Museum in London stop taking money from the oil company Shell? We talk to a student activist, Anya Nanning Ramamurthy of the UK Student Climate Network, who held a protest at the Science Museum over the weekend of 19 and 20 June, and Chris Garrard, co-director of the ethical sponsorship campaigners Culture Unstained, about fossil-fuel sponsorship and the increasing pressure on the museum. Louisa Buck talks to the British artist Michael Landy about his exhibition Michael Landy's Welcome to Essex at Firstsite in Colchester in the southeastern English county of Essex. And in this week’s Work of the Week, Pakistani American artist Shahzia Sikander, who has a new exhibition at the Morgan Library and Museum in New York, talks to Helen Stoilas, our editor in the Americas, about Kṛṣṇa and Rādhā beneath a flowering tree, a manuscript miniature in the Indian Nathadvara style, painted between 1825 and 1850, which is in the Morgan’s collection. Sikander discusses the way she has brought a contemporary perspective on this work and the broader tradition of manuscript painting in South and Central Asia in her own practice.
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    • 1 hr 1 min
    Slavery at the Rijksmuseum, Leonora Carrington and a Rubens Reunion

    Slavery at the Rijksmuseum, Leonora Carrington and a Rubens Reunion

    This week, we look at a much anticipated exhibition, Slavery at the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam. The Rijksmuseum is the Netherlands’ national art and history museum and the curators of the exhibition state in the catalogue that the country’s colonial past has been "insufficiently examined in the national history of the Netherlands, including at the Rijksmuseum”. Ben Luke talks to Valika Smeulders, head of history at the Rijksmuseum and one of the four curators of the exhibition, focusing on several works in the show and exploring the people—from enslaved men and women to wealthy Amsterdam denizens who benefit from slavery—who feature in the exhibition. Also in this episode: as next year’s Venice Biennale is named after The Milk of Dreams, a children’s book by the Surrealist artist Leonora Carrington, Ben talks to Joanna Moorhead, a relative of Carrington’s and the author of The Surreal Life of Leonora Carrington, about the stories, what they tell us about the author, and what they might mean for the next Venice Biennale. And this episode’s Work of the Week is actually two works: Peter Paul Rubens’s two landscape masterpieces The Rainbow Landscape and A View of Het Steen in the Early Morning, which have been reunited for the first time in 200 years at the Wallace Collection in London.
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    • 1 hr

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5
108 Ratings

108 Ratings

Miriam Schulman ,

Top notch

Just discovered this podcast starting with the review of 2020. I absolutely loved the conversions about how social issues and politics affect the art world.

@schulmanart host of the Inspiration Place podcast

trillionshelper ,

Almost Perfect

Thank you for your fascinating and enjoyable podcast. I would rate it 100% perfect if you didn’t have the very annoying music in the background while the host speaks—-does anyone not find that very intrusive and annoying ??

Syntax Babe ,

review

I was looking forward to this podcast but although a good effort, it is rather uneven. I don’t much mind the low production values (heaven knows, we’re all suddenly improvising in this medium). Nor do I mind a generally informal tone. But many of the commentators seem uncertain, frequently punctuating their remarks with “kind of” and “sort of.” How could the exhibit in Provincetown “sort of” acknowledge the native role in the U.S. holiday of Thanksgiving? It either did or it didn’t! Too much of this kind of thing (including in the 2020 wrap up). It makes me wonder the guests really know what they’re talking about. The first speaker on Thanksgiving did a fine job, however, and could serve as a model to others.

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