736 episodes

Weekly episodes digging up lost and forgotten 90s rock — in-depth album reviews, roundtable discussions, and artist interviews that reveal the unique story of the 90s.

Dig Me Out: 90s Rock Dig Me Out

    • Music
    • 4.4 • 127 Ratings

Weekly episodes digging up lost and forgotten 90s rock — in-depth album reviews, roundtable discussions, and artist interviews that reveal the unique story of the 90s.

    Big Hate - You're Soaking In It | 90s Album Review

    Big Hate - You're Soaking In It | 90s Album Review

    Plenty of guitar-oriented bands rose to prominence in the 1990s thanks to wave after wave of new artists from various genres. The Seattle sound, pop punk, Britpop, etc. all offered a diverse array of sounds for six-string fans. It was like the 1980s era of guitar heroes, but with an emphasis on diversity of tone and style - the melodic mayhem of J. Mascis to the angular buzzsaw of Kim Thayil to the jazzy funk of John Frusciante - all finding the balance between creative tangents and serving the songs. That brings us to Big Hate, an Atlanta via New York band that utilize a fuzz pedal to its maximum potential. From the opener "Century," that features a lazy slide adding just the right amount of dissonance, to the riffing "Writer's Block," the band takes full advantage of their twin guitar attack. But while it shines musically, the band leaves a bit to be desired vocally, from not nailing a truly hooky chorus, to often sliding into early Our Lady Peace / Raine Maida territory.
     
    Songs In This Episode
    Intro - Century
    15:46 - West Virginia
    20:34 - Disappointed
    22:45 - Writer's Block
    24:41 - Rock That Doesn't Roll / Dope Nostalgia podcast promos
    34:35 - Lemonade
    38:13 - Sufi
    Outro - Beauty Mark
     
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    Listen to the episode archive at DigMeOutPodcast.com.

    • 54 min
    311 - Grassroots | 90s Album Review

    311 - Grassroots | 90s Album Review

    By the end of the 1990s, mixing rock and other genres was no big deal, but in the first half the first half of the decade it was still a novel idea. 311 established their unique sound by mixing elements rock, reggae, hip-hop, and funk, and on their sophomore album Grassroots, bits of 70s progressive rock and psychedelic jam bands. The innovative fusion of genres, combined with high-energy vocal and musical performances, make the album an undeniable head-bobber. On the flip-side, the band can lock into a staccato delivery across instruments, not exploring interesting counter melodies or rhythms, while certain genre touches can go overboard into straight-up imitation. Depending on your musical preferences, it can make for an exciting experience or a repetitive disappointment.
     
    Songs In This Episode
    Intro - Homebrew
    23:54 - Lucky
    28:32 - Salsa
    40:40 - Rock That Doesn't Roll / Dope Nostalgia podcast promos
    48:47 - Omaha Stylee
    57:43 - 8:16 AM
    Outro - 1, 2, 3
     
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    Listen to the episode archive at DigMeOutPodcast.com.

    • 1 hr 12 min
    Bruce Springsteen In The 90s | Roundtable

    Bruce Springsteen In The 90s | Roundtable

    After achieving massive success in the 1970s and 80s, Bruce Springsteen began the 1990s with the release of two albums in 1992, "Human Touch" and "Lucky Town," which showcased a departure from his work with the E Street Band. Like with his 1987 album "Tunnel of Love," Springsteen explored more personal themes at the end of his marriage and relocation from New Jersey to Los Angeles. Despite mixed critical reception, the albums produced notable singles like "Human Touch" and "Better Days." While some wrote off Springsteen as stale and out of touch, he returned on the soundtrack to the movie Philadelphia with the haunting and sparse "Streets of Philadelphia." He followed that up in 1995 with "The Ghost of Tom Joad," a stark, acoustic folk album that harkened back to the style of "Nebraska" and focused on social and economic issues, earning him critical acclaim and a Grammy Award for the title track. This period, though less commercially dominant than the 1980s, demonstrated Springsteen's versatility and commitment to evolving as an artist, and the 1998 four-disc compilation Tracks made up of 66-outtakes from the earliest years of his career up to the 90s showcased his hidden gems and concert-only favorites, leading up to his induction into the Rock 'n Roll Hall of Fame in 1999.
     
    Songs In This Episode:
    Intro - Better Days (Lucky Town)
    19:12 - Leap of Faith (Lucky Town)
    34:42 - Streets of Philadelphia (Philadelphia soundtrack)
    45:27 - Rock That Doesn't Roll / Dop Nostalgia podcast promos
    50:20 - Youngstown (The Ghost of Tom Joad)
    1:03:45 - Born In The U.S.A. (Tracks)
    1:11:52 - American Skin (41 Shots) (Live)
    Outro - 57 Channels (And Nothin' On) (Human Touch)
     
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    Listen to the episode archive at DigMeOutPodcast.com.

    • 1 hr 32 min
    The Dwarves - The Dwarves Are Young and Good Looking | 90s Album Review

    The Dwarves - The Dwarves Are Young and Good Looking | 90s Album Review

    The provocative album covers and lyrical content have kept the Dwarves an underground band for four decades, appreciated by punk enthusiasts and fellow musicians across musical genres. After getting dropped by Sub Pop, the band returned with The Dwarves Are Young and Good Looking in 1997. While a cursory listen pins this as classic punk rock, the band isn't afraid to push the pop end of punk thanks to doubled and harmonized vocals spitting out obviously catch choruses that only missed mainstream attention thanks to a liberal use of explicit language and themes.
     
    Songs In This Episode
    Intro - Crucifixion Is Now
    20:43 - I Will Deny
    25:54 - Rock That Doesn't Roll / Dope Nostalgia podcast promos
    28:17 - Everybodies Girl
    30:08 - You Gotta Burn
    39:02 - Unrepentant
    45:52 - Demonica
    Outro - We Must Have Blood
     
    Support the podcast, join the DMO UNION at Patreon.
    Listen to the episode archive at DigMeOutPodcast.com.

    • 56 min
    Subrosa - Never Bet The Devil Your Head | 90s Album Review

    Subrosa - Never Bet The Devil Your Head | 90s Album Review

    No one would have faulted the surviving members of For Squirrels for moving on from music after the horrific accident that claimed the life of their singer, bassist, and road manager. It took years for guitarist/singer Travis Tooke and drummer Jack Griego to regroup with new bassist Andy Jim Lord under the new moniker Subrosa and land a new record deal, the end result being their 1997 lone release Never Bet The Devil Your Head. While For Squirrels drew comparisons to the college rock of R.E.M., Subrosa dials up rock, dabbling in a post-hardocre riffage while Tooke switches between a lower register singing voice and a fiery growl. Passionate but uneven, the record doesn't shy away from the past for the Tooke and Griego, who channel their catharsis in equal parts volume and melancholy.
     
    Songs In This Episode
    Intro - Never The Best
    13:42 - World's Greatest Lover
    23:01 - The Life Inside Me Killed This Song
    28:38 - Antigen Fiend
    32:33 - Dope Nostalgia Promo
    34:27 - Damn The Youth
    Outro - Rollercoaster
     
    Support the podcast, join the DMO UNION at Patreon.
    Listen to the episode archive at DigMeOutPodcast.com.

    • 57 min
    Alanis Morissette - Jagged Little Pill | 90s Album Review

    Alanis Morissette - Jagged Little Pill | 90s Album Review

    It's hard to look back on the 1990s and remember a time when Alanis Morissette was not one of its most recognizable artists. At the start of the decade, unless you were familiar with Canadian pop music or the Nickelodeon show "You Can't Do That On Television," you'd be forgiven for not knowing her name. In 1995, that all changed. Thanks to a meeting with songwriter/producer Glen Ballard, the creatively frustrated 19-year old teen pop star was able to reinvent herself by stripping away the restraints of her previous career and starting anew. Songwriting sessions with Ballard allowed Morissette to unleash her voice, sonically and lyrically, one demo at a time into what would become one of the most successful albums in history. As impressive as the sales numbers are, unlike other massive multi-platinum world sellers, Jagged Little Pill does it without being glossy and over-produced, relying on simple drum loops, tasteful guitars, and the occasional bouncy bassline to provide the foundation for Morissette's singular voice.
     
    Songs In This Episode
    Intro - You Outta Know
    29:52 - Right Through You
    32:35 - Dope Nostalgia Promo
    37:03 - All I Really Want
    46:55 - Not The Doctor
    50:56 - Mary Jane
    Outro - Head Over Feet
     
    Support the podcast, join the DMO UNION at Patreon.
    Listen to the episode archive at DigMeOutPodcast.com.

    • 1 hr 10 min

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5
127 Ratings

127 Ratings

Mikez33 ,

Just found this walk through my Playlists

Excellent shows, covering the music I still mainly listen to. Spent my teens and twenties getting these CD’s while in the Toledo/ Detroit area. Keep up the great music reviews!

qwertyJYM ,

Great!

Great podcast!

id43 ,

Madchester

This review of the madchester scene seems to miss the mark a bit. I know that this is a 90s rock podcast, so either these guys are unaware, uninterested, or just aren’t covering other types of music (black music in particular) . I know they brought a guest on here. Being very enthusiastic about these bands at the time these records were being released, I’d describe the madchester sound as a mix of 60s psychedelic music and contemporary black music. The Byrds, Love and Hendrix meets Chicago and Detroit House and Public Enemy/ Eric B and Rakim era hip hop. The Happy Mondays were less specific but utilized a huge early techno influence. The marriage of guitar and dance elements, sampled beats mixed with jangly guitars. Stone Roses are like a druggy, more black influenced Smiths because the songs are well crafted and pretty. As for New Order, they were pioneers of this type of dance/rock mixture. If anything, it’s closest American analog would be Grunge. It was a sound, a look, and an attitude. Not all madchester bands were from Manchester, just like all the grunge bands weren’t from Seattle. Nobody wore baggy clothes until these guys did. Even Chuck D had tight jeans on at this point.

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