6 episodes

Are my devices tracking me? Why is social media so toxic? How can I get control over my digital life? Digital Citizen is for you if you love the Internet and want to use it more intelligently and thoughtfully. Our show explores the issues facing Internet users, and gives you actionable steps to be a better digital citizen. Digital Citizen is produced by Fastmail, the leader in email privacy for over 20 years. Join Fastmail's CTO, Ricardo Signes, as he talks to some of the best minds on topics surrounding the human element in technology.

Digital Citizen Fastmail

    • Technology
    • 4.9 • 14 Ratings

Are my devices tracking me? Why is social media so toxic? How can I get control over my digital life? Digital Citizen is for you if you love the Internet and want to use it more intelligently and thoughtfully. Our show explores the issues facing Internet users, and gives you actionable steps to be a better digital citizen. Digital Citizen is produced by Fastmail, the leader in email privacy for over 20 years. Join Fastmail's CTO, Ricardo Signes, as he talks to some of the best minds on topics surrounding the human element in technology.

    How to Stay Safe Online with Michael Fey from 1Password

    How to Stay Safe Online with Michael Fey from 1Password

    Season 1 is complete, stay tuned for season 2! Subscribe today, so you will get notified when we are back.
     
    On this special bonus episode of the Digital Citizen Podcast, Michael Fey, 1Password's VP of Engineering, talks to Fastmail CTO, Ricardo Signes, about a new partnership between Fastmail and 1Password.
     
    Explore the Masked Email integration, which is available to everyone with both Fastmail and 1Password accounts, and learn how you can protect your online privacy with unique email addresses. Rik and Michael also discuss Internet security, password managers, and secure email. If you want to be more secure online, this is the episode for you.
    ▶️ Guest Interview - Michael Fey
    Follow Michael Fey on Twitter - @MrRooni Try Masked Email today! Learn more about Masked Email Get 25 percent off your first year of 1Password Families when you create your account. Start your 30 day trial of Fastmail at fastmail.com/podcast 🗣️ Discussion Points
    Most places on the internet require you to provide an email and password when you signup. Using the same email address everywhere means that someone who knows your email address knows half of what it takes to access your account. Now with Masked Email, you can generate a unique email address in the same way that you generate a unique password. You can easily disable Masked Email addresses if you find they’ve been targeted with spam. 1Password is a password manager that makes it easy to store and use strong passwords. Your data is end-to-end encrypted and only you have access – 1Password can't see what you store in 1Password or which sites you visit. Michael Fey's number one piece of advice for passwords is to not reuse them. Using a different password for every service you signup for will keep you more secure online. Ideally, you shouldn’t even know your password! Let an app like 1Password generate your passwords. If you are using the same password for your shoe store and your bank, your bank details are only as secure as the shoe store’s security. Most people do not protect their email addresses and generally use the same one everywhere. When your email address gets leaked, that's a link in the chain that a hacker can exploit. Even with unique passwords, a single email address can still be a point of weakness from phishing attacks and other exploits. Security and privacy go hand-in-hand. Security is about keeping your information safe. Privacy is about keeping your information hidden. Making and Managing Masked Email addresses in 1Password will be familiar if you've used 1Password before. Keeping your email anonymous is now as easy as generating a strong password, you can create a Masked Email address without ever leaving the sign-up page. ⭐ Takeaways
    Being a good digital citizen involves being nice and kind online, in the same way you would be in person. We all want compassion, respect, and dignity. Using a password manager is the easiest way to store and use strong passwords and protect yourself online. Having a different email address for each online service you use gives you an extra layer of security, if you're also using unique passwords for each account. It also protects you by keeping your real email address private from the apps or services that you sign up for. 🔵  Find Us
    Digital Citizen Website: fastmail.com/digitalcitizen Check out our blog Tweet us @Fastmail 💙  Review Us
    If you love this show, please leave us a review on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts. Take our survey to tell us what you think at digitalcitizenshow.com/survey.

    • 33 min
    Why Open Internet Standards Are So Important To Your Future with Bron Gondwana

    Why Open Internet Standards Are So Important To Your Future with Bron Gondwana

    Have you ever wondered how the Internet works, how it's governed, or why some devices and services work together and others don't? In the final episode of this season, Fastmail CEO, Bron Gondwana answers these questions and more, so you can learn how standards make the Internet better for everyone.
    Get a crash course about open standards, how they work, and why we need to support organizations that use them. Bron and show host Fastmail's CTO, Ricardo Signes, talk about JMAP, an open standard for email that Fastmail's developers produced, which is moving email forward.
    Additionally, before and after the show hear Rik and Fastmail's COO, Helen, talk about how the internet came to be what it is today and what the future of the Internet may look like.
    ▶️ Guest Interview - Bron Gondwana
    Follow @BronGondwana on Twitter Visit ietf.org for more information about IETF Learn about JMAP at jmap.io or by reading this article Start your 30 day trial of Fastmail at fastmail.com/podcast 🗣️ Discussion Points
    Bron is the CEO of Fastmail and has been working with email for over 20 years. There are all kinds of standards in the world, including the very language we use to communicate meaning to each other. Most standards in the real world function as a rule of law, but standards on the internet are more agreement and consensus-based. Standards work a lot like language, they evolve and are built onto over time. Most of the standards work that Bron does is in an organization called the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), which has been around for the past 50 years. Many of the devices you have in your home likely have IETF standards built into them. Email has been an open standard since the 1970s. Chat is an example of the opposite, with no open chat standards becoming dominant. Your open standard has to be as good as, or better than, the closed solutions in order to compete. Many standards have failed to gain traction because people have to discard what’s already working for them. Your standard has to be an evolution that adds value to people’s lives. If you're not a market-dominant organization, embracing and innovating through open standards produces global change while still letting users interoperate with each other. For non-programmers, it’s important to choose software and devices that use and support open standards. Using open standards is future-proofing yourself and your work and puts you outside of the whims of a company as they change over time. ⭐ Takeaways
    Being a good digital citizen is similar to being a good citizen in general—leave things better than you found them. JMAP is exciting because it is built on top of other modern standards like JSON and HTTP. Because most programmers are already familiar with them, it makes the barrier to entry easier to traverse. Technology and open standards have enabled a boom in opportunity for people to build products and companies they believe in. Open standards allow global communications to work. One thing everyone should be doing is thinking about whether they are locking themselves into services that restrict their choices and control the access to their data to a single, private platform. When deciding what services to use, choose services that use open standards. If you’re building software, use open standards and help other people make choices that are good for future digital citizens. 🔵  Find Us
    Digital Citizen Website: fastmail.com/digitalcitizen Check out our blog Tweet us @Fastmail 💙  Review Us
    If you love this show, please leave us a review on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts. Take our survey to tell us what you think at digitalcitizenshow.com/survey.

    • 33 min
    Understanding Your Digital Rights with Lucie Krahulcova

    Understanding Your Digital Rights with Lucie Krahulcova

    Have you ever wondered if you have privacy rights online? As the digital world and the real world become more and more intertwined, the importance of protecting privacy continues to expand.
    Lucie Krahulcova, Executive Director at Digital Rights Watch, talks to Ricardo about privacy laws around the world and how to speak up to demand better digital privacy.
    Lucie says that the conversation around digital rights and human rights is more important than ever. In this episode, learn about privacy legislation around the globe. We'll also discuss corporate privacy issues, like how some companies model their business around collecting your personal information. But most importantly, we'll tell you what to do to reclaim your digital rights such as choosing products and services that put you first and protect you.
    Stay tuned to the end of the episode to hear Helen and Rik talk about the parts of the internet that they love the most and to hear Rik's takeaways.
    ▶️ Guest Interview - Lucie Krahulcova
    Follow @nomadiclucie on Twitter Follow @DRWaus on Twitter Visit: https://digitalrightswatch.org.au Join the campaign for digital rights cities: https://digitalrightswatch.org.au/cities/ 🗣️ Discussion Points
    Lucie is a digital rights advocate who has been working in the space for years now. She is the Executive Director of Digital Rights Watch. The central mission of Digital Rights Watch is to ensure fairness and freedom in the digital space. Just having a list of digital rights is not enough to ensure those rights are respected. Unless personal data rights are enshrined in law, many corporations have no incentive to respect your privacy. GDPR is one such set of data privacy laws, and while it is a uniquely European approach, it has turned out to be both functional and practical for users. GDPR affected many tech companies globally. It’s impossible to build a digital rights framework without an existing human rights framework to work from. Globally, if we could agree to go along with the human rights that have already been established we would already have more privacy rights online. The amount of data that is collected about the average person is astounding. Many tech companies' entire business model is built around using that data to serve targeted advertising or reselling that data to other companies. The cookie pop-ups that are now more common are an example of getting into a contractual relationship with a website you are visiting. When it comes to digital rights, we have to ask, is it reasonable for the average person to have to commit to those kinds of relationships in the normal course of using the internet? There is no point in your experience in a city where you are not generating data somewhere, even if it’s just traffic volume. People often forget to have conversations with their local representatives about their privacy rights. Find the digital rights people in your area and have a conversation with them to learn what you can do to protect your digital rights. Most people are surrounded by the internet all the time. With the pandemic, people having connected devices in every room in their house has been normalized. As a whole, we have to be more conscious about how we interact with technology. The internet is a double-edged sword. It creates incredible access to resources, information, and community, alongside the negative aspects of losing our privacy. The community you have on the internet is a powerful tool to mobilize people and create real change in the world. ⭐ Takeaways
    You should care about your data privacy, online and in real life. Your digital rights are your human rights in the digital realm. You need to be aware of what data is being collected about you and how it’s being used. It's important to talk to your local governments and tell them that your digital rights matter to you. Share information with your friends and family and talk to them about their digital rights and how the c

    • 37 min
    How To Have a Healthier Social Media Diet with Tom Webster

    How To Have a Healthier Social Media Diet with Tom Webster

    Around the world, people are spending more time online. If you've spent any of this time "doom-scrolling" your social feeds, you know that social media can impact how you feel. But it's not all doom and gloom, and you can reclaim control. In this episode, Ricardo talks to Tom Webster, a researcher specializing in how people use technology. They'll chat about social media's role in our overall emotional health and how to strike a balance online, so you feel good, not sad.
    Tom Webster breaks down the research around social media, its usage, and its impact on people's lives. Learn about how social media has changed the way people interact with each other over the past two decades, what that means for your personal happiness and well being, and how to use social media in a responsible way that protects your emotional state and helps you avoid the rabbit hole of rampant, and often rabid, personal opinion.
    Before and after the interview, Rik and Helen talk about the social media platforms that they use and how they use them.
    If you cut out social media from your life, are you still a digital citizen? We need to begin thinking about how to be a good digital citizens by understanding the tradeoffs we make by using social media.
    🎙️Guest Interview - Tom Webster
    Follow @webby2001 on Twitter Edison Research Learn more about Tom's social media research 🗣️ Discussion Points
    Social media encompasses many different spaces. Exploring how they make us feel is crucial to the conversation around social media. People need to be more intentional around social media and deliberately make choices about how much to use it instead of falling into the same habits each day. Tom Webster is the Senior Vice President at Edison Research. Each week, they put out a study about social media platforms, who is using them, and their impact on society. One of the things they found in the survey was that roughly half the respondents thought that social media was harming them somehow. Like a glass of water can’t be half dirty, from a societal perspective, social media has certainly had a harmful effect on some level. A significant percentage of people get their news from social media, but that’s a bit deceptive since the ultimate sources are often news media companies. Social media's primary effect is to amplify the lesser heard voice, which comes with its own set of benefits and challenges. The ability to fact-check information on Facebook is an issue of scale. There is no governing body like the FCC for social media, but a good solution is not necessarily government action. Much of the success of social media is because of the lack of regulation. There is a lot of good that comes from social media. Tom takes certain steps to protect his well-being while using social media, and one of the biggest is that he completely avoids reading editorials and opinion pieces. Tom is a consistent un-follower of people. His test for people is not whether he agrees or disagrees with them. It’s whether they are willing to entertain an argument against their perspective. You can’t uninvite Uncle Ralph from Thanksgiving dinner, but you don’t have to follow them on Facebook. It’s the community's job to make sure that everybody feels heard and to avoid harming anyone else. If you can do those two things, you are contributing value to that community. ⭐ Takeaways
    Tom Webster's suggestion about how to be a better digital citizen: Have a healthy media diet and understand the sources of the information that you are taking in. Don’t unfollow or block people if they disagree with you, but unfollow or block them if they are disagreeable. Be careful with opinions and editorials because they are designed to inflame and incite. Look for the smaller communities based around an enjoyable activity. The key point to remember is that social media impacts how you feel. You should be putting your own mental health first and prioritizing what is good for

    • 30 min
    How To Improve Your Digital Life with BJ Fogg

    How To Improve Your Digital Life with BJ Fogg

    Welcome to the first episode of the Digital Citizen podcast! Your host, Fastmail's CTO, Ricardo (Rik) Signes, talks to BJ Fogg, a behavioral scientist, about how to make positive changes in your digital life.
    In an increasingly technological world, it's essential to leverage the power of tiny habits to create meaningful, lasting change in your behavior. BJ Fogg talks with us about how you can use his framework to have a healthier relationship with technology and the people in your life.
     
    Rik and Fastmail's COO, Helen, talk about the digital habits they want to change in their daily lives. Before the show, we learn that Rik and Helen's dream show topics include the Fast and The Furious franchise, playing cricket, and science fiction books!
    ▶️ Guest Interview - BJ Fogg
    Follow @bjfogg on Twitter Visit: tinyhabits.com/join Reduce your screen time: screentime.stanford.edu 🗣️ Discussion Points
    BJ Fogg is a behavioral scientist who wrote the book, Tiny Habits. His work has always focused on helping people be happier and healthier through behavior change. The Fogg Behavior Model is the core of behavior design. A behavior happens when three things come together simultaneously: the motivation to do the behavior, the ability to do the behavior, and the prompt. If any one of those things is missing, the habit won’t happen. You can think of habits like plants. You take a good seed (habit) and put it into a good spot (in your routine), and then nurture it. If you don’t tend to your garden, you will end up cultivating a garden of weeds. Technology should be used to bring humans together. If you are having a conversation with someone, put your phone away and give them your full attention. Go into your phone and take control of your notifications. Don’t let apps dictate your behavior. BJ and his lab have been studying the effects of screen time on people and how they can better understand where and how they spend their time. Managing and strengthening our closest relationships is the best use of our mobile phones. ⭐ Takeaways
    BJ Fogg's suggestions on how to become a better digital citizen: Alert people of the dangers of certain social media platforms Help people understand that some web browsers track immense amounts of data about you Sit down with someone to help them with their notifications (if you see something designed to exploit people, you should let them know) Promote and share the things that make us happier and healthier We spend a lot of time interacting with computers. We need to be intentional about how we interact with them and what goals we want to achieve. You can help others by sharing with people what you know. For example, talk about the value of password managers and two-factor authentication for better privacy and security. Being a good digital citizen is about helping others live better online every day. 🔵  Find Us
    Digital Citizen Website - fastmail.com/digitalcitizen  For a free month of Fastmail, visit fastmail.com/podcast Check out our blog Tweet us @Fastmail 💙  Review Us
    If you love this show, please leave us a review on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts.

    • 37 min
    Digital Citizen - Trailer #1

    Digital Citizen - Trailer #1

    How to live your best digital life and make the Internet a better place.
    From your friends at Fastmail.com 

    • 1 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
14 Ratings

14 Ratings

JesusBenNazareth ,

Digital Citizenship

Contributing to the IETF - Internet Standards.
Helping people protect themselves from attack.
Perpetuating free speech.
Fighting Network Abuse - including realizing that without consequences and ways of enforcing those consequences, one cannot quell network abuse long term.

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