25 episodes

A podcast of dime novel readings. The adventures of Buffalo Bill, Texas Jack, Wild Bill, White Beaver, Diamond Dick, and many more. Tales of western border romance, secret societies, detectives and mysteries, and so much more. These stories were originally printed by publishers like Street & Smith and Beadle's for a nickel or a dime, but you get them for free!

Note: These stories were largely written and published in the second half of the 19th century. They are very much products of their time, for better or worse. While their themes and characters have often aged well, other aspects have not. I am reading these stories as written, rather than changing or omitting words, phrases, or characterizations that might strike a modern audience as racist. In the story Texas Jack, The Prairie Rattler by Buffalo Bill Cody, a character named Ebony is referred to as a negro often, and at least once by a worse racial epitaph by an antagonist. Omitting these references would be disingenuous, but would also do a disservice to the story and its writer, who portrays Texas Jack—a former Confederate scout and the son of a southern slave owner—as the friend and companion of this black character. These men were absolutely products of their time, but that time was one of immense change and progress, and within that context, men like John Omohundro and William Cody would prove to be incredibly progressive. Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/dime-library/support

Dime Library Dime Library

    • History
    • 5.0 • 4 Ratings

A podcast of dime novel readings. The adventures of Buffalo Bill, Texas Jack, Wild Bill, White Beaver, Diamond Dick, and many more. Tales of western border romance, secret societies, detectives and mysteries, and so much more. These stories were originally printed by publishers like Street & Smith and Beadle's for a nickel or a dime, but you get them for free!

Note: These stories were largely written and published in the second half of the 19th century. They are very much products of their time, for better or worse. While their themes and characters have often aged well, other aspects have not. I am reading these stories as written, rather than changing or omitting words, phrases, or characterizations that might strike a modern audience as racist. In the story Texas Jack, The Prairie Rattler by Buffalo Bill Cody, a character named Ebony is referred to as a negro often, and at least once by a worse racial epitaph by an antagonist. Omitting these references would be disingenuous, but would also do a disservice to the story and its writer, who portrays Texas Jack—a former Confederate scout and the son of a southern slave owner—as the friend and companion of this black character. These men were absolutely products of their time, but that time was one of immense change and progress, and within that context, men like John Omohundro and William Cody would prove to be incredibly progressive. Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/dime-library/support

    Charles Belden; Or, Photographing the Pitchfork

    Charles Belden; Or, Photographing the Pitchfork

    Texas Jack Omohundro shaped the American West not just in the perceptions of theater-goers who watched him on stage, but through the lives of the men he took on treks throughout the West, and specifically in Wyoming. In 1878, Texas Jack headed for Rawlins with Count Otto Franc von Lichtenstein and Doctor Amandus Ferber. Both men were wealthy Germans who had earned their fortunes in America; Franc importing fruit and Ferber as one of New York City's finest medical doctors.  The trio spent three weeks exploring south of Rawlins followed by six weeks in the Bighorn Basin. As they fished and hunted for deer, antelope, elk, and buffalo, Franc and the former Texas cowboy discussed the region's potential for cattle ranching. The next year, Franc returned to the area to start his own cattle operation along the Greybull River, naming it Pitchfork Ranch.  Franc died in 1903. He never married and had no children, and the ranch was left in his will to two sisters who still lived in Germany. Franc's brother traveled to Wyoming from his home in New York City and arranged the sale of the property for his sisters, and Pitchfork Ranch was purchased by L. G. Phelps. L. G.'s son Eugene traveled throughout Europe and Russia with some college friends from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the summer of 1909. One of those friends was Charles Belden, who decided to join Eugene at the Pitchfork when the trip ended, spending time working as a cowboy and falling in love with Eugene's sister Frances.  Frances and Charles were married in 1913 and moved to the ranch full-time in 1914. L. G. Phelps died in 1922, leaving the Pitchfork to his son Eugene and his son-in-law Charles Belden. Neither was adept at running a ranch. They met in the engineering school at M.I.T. and Eugene remained preoccupied with inventions while Belden was devoted to photography. He had taken pictures for much of his life, including during his college trip to Europe and Russia with Eugene Phelps, and he continued to use his camera to document life on the Pitchfork Ranch.  His photographs document the entire cycle of ranch life, from birthing and branding cattle to sheering sheep, making camp, repairing fences, and pitching hay. He sold his photographs to a range of publications. Belden's photographs were printed in livestock magazines like The Cattleman and The American Hereford Journal, newspapers like the Denver Post and the Chicago Daily News, and broadly read magazines like National Geographic, the Saturday Evening Post, and Life. His work shaped the way that cowboys and ranching were perceived by the American public in much the same way Texas Jack's writings on cowboy life featured in the Spirit of the Times and reprinted for Buffalo Bill's Wild West had fifty years earlier.  If you're ever lucky enough to spend time in the Bighorn Basin, you can visit the Pitchfork Ranch as well as the Charles Belden Western Photography Museum in Meeteetse, Wyoming.


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    • 3 min
    The Oldest Man on Utah Beach; Or, Theodore Roosevelt Jr on D-Day

    The Oldest Man on Utah Beach; Or, Theodore Roosevelt Jr on D-Day

    Only one general landed by sea with the first wave of troops to brave the beaches of Normandy.  The man who led the 8th Infantry Regiment and the 70th Tank Battalion at Utah Beach was not a young and exuberant West Point graduate–at fifty-six years old, this General was actually the oldest man in the invasion.  He was also the only man to participate in the Normandy invasion whose son was also on the beaches that day, among the first soldiers to climb from the sea at Omaha Beach.


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    • 4 min
    Texas Jack, Will Rogers, and the American Cowboy - A Learning Lecture from the Will Rogers Memorial Museum April 21, 2022

    Texas Jack, Will Rogers, and the American Cowboy - A Learning Lecture from the Will Rogers Memorial Museum April 21, 2022

    On April 21, I was welcomed by the Will Rogers Memorial Museum in Claremore, Oklahoma, to talk about Texas Jack, his surprising connection with Will Rogers, and the unlikely path the American cowboy took to its current iconic status.  The museum broadcast and recorded the talk, which is available in video format on their YouTube page.



    The Will Rogers Memorial Museum is a wonderful museum dedicated to the life and legacy of Will Rogers, one of the most famous and beloved entertainers in American history.




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    • 1 hr 13 min
    Texas Jack Makes an Entrance; Or, His Favorite Horse

    Texas Jack Makes an Entrance; Or, His Favorite Horse

    Texas Jack and his horses.


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    • 6 min
    Texas Jack In the Timber Island; Or, Parted Lovers Reunited

    Texas Jack In the Timber Island; Or, Parted Lovers Reunited

    This long poem about Texas Jack is from the 1890 book May-Day Dreams, Passion Flowers, Poetic Flights and Prosy Thoughts by Sam Brown Jr., "the Cowboy Poet of the Platte."

    Reading this one, a couple of lines stuck with me. "He was all that any maiden might wish for in the shape of man. Half cowboy and half scout, he seemed a youthful errant knight.  Poor Texas Jack, how pure thy spirit was! The world hath judged, yet known thee not—hath called thee "wild," "inebriate." A mirthful, bold, but reckless scout, yet, oh, what melancholy and heartache were thine!  How tirelessly upon thy track care, despair, and sorrow ever trod."


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    • 31 min
    The Shooting Dentist; Or, Doctor W. F Carver's Wild West

    The Shooting Dentist; Or, Doctor W. F Carver's Wild West

    Doctor W. F. Carver went from his dentist office in North PLatte Nebraska to become the world's most accomplished rifle marksman.


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    • 5 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
4 Ratings

4 Ratings

Matt from Chattanooga ,

Westerns

I mean, why not?

Yes, I'm reviewing this, because I still think its a really good idea. These stories remain fun and entertaining. Even though they were only a dime, they're now free to listen to. What a value!

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