21 episodes

A podcast of dime novel readings. The adventures of Buffalo Bill, Texas Jack, Wild Bill, White Beaver, Diamond Dick, and many more. Tales of western border romance, secret societies, detectives and mysteries, and so much more. These stories were originally printed by publishers like Street & Smith and Beadle's for a nickel or a dime, but you get them for free!

Note: These stories were largely written and published in the second half of the 19th century. They are very much products of their time, for better or worse. While their themes and characters have often aged well, other aspects have not. I am reading these stories as written, rather than changing or omitting words, phrases, or characterizations that might strike a modern audience as racist. In the story Texas Jack, The Prairie Rattler by Buffalo Bill Cody, a character named Ebony is referred to as a negro often, and at least once by a worse racial epitaph by an antagonist. Omitting these references would be disingenuous, but would also do a disservice to the story and its writer, who portrays Texas Jack—a former Confederate scout and the son of a southern slave owner—as the friend and companion of this black character. These men were absolutely products of their time, but that time was one of immense change and progress, and within that context, men like John Omohundro and William Cody would prove to be incredibly progressive. Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/dime-library/support

Dime Library Dime Library

    • History
    • 5.0 • 2 Ratings

A podcast of dime novel readings. The adventures of Buffalo Bill, Texas Jack, Wild Bill, White Beaver, Diamond Dick, and many more. Tales of western border romance, secret societies, detectives and mysteries, and so much more. These stories were originally printed by publishers like Street & Smith and Beadle's for a nickel or a dime, but you get them for free!

Note: These stories were largely written and published in the second half of the 19th century. They are very much products of their time, for better or worse. While their themes and characters have often aged well, other aspects have not. I am reading these stories as written, rather than changing or omitting words, phrases, or characterizations that might strike a modern audience as racist. In the story Texas Jack, The Prairie Rattler by Buffalo Bill Cody, a character named Ebony is referred to as a negro often, and at least once by a worse racial epitaph by an antagonist. Omitting these references would be disingenuous, but would also do a disservice to the story and its writer, who portrays Texas Jack—a former Confederate scout and the son of a southern slave owner—as the friend and companion of this black character. These men were absolutely products of their time, but that time was one of immense change and progress, and within that context, men like John Omohundro and William Cody would prove to be incredibly progressive. Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/dime-library/support

    Texas Jack In the Timber Island; Or, Parted Lovers Reunited

    Texas Jack In the Timber Island; Or, Parted Lovers Reunited

    This long poem about Texas Jack is from the 1890 book May-Day Dreams, Passion Flowers, Poetic Flights and Prosy Thoughts by Sam Brown Jr., "the Cowboy Poet of the Platte."

    Reading this one, a couple of lines stuck with me. "He was all that any maiden might wish for in the shape of man. Half cowboy and half scout, he seemed a youthful errant knight.  Poor Texas Jack, how pure thy spirit was! The world hath judged, yet known thee not—hath called thee "wild," "inebriate." A mirthful, bold, but reckless scout, yet, oh, what melancholy and heartache were thine!  How tirelessly upon thy track care, despair, and sorrow ever trod."


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    • 31 min
    The Shooting Dentist; Or, Doctor W. F Carver's Wild West

    The Shooting Dentist; Or, Doctor W. F Carver's Wild West

    Doctor W. F. Carver went from his dentist office in North PLatte Nebraska to become the world's most accomplished rifle marksman.


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    • 5 min
    Massacre Canyon; Or, The End of a Lifeway

    Massacre Canyon; Or, The End of a Lifeway

    Just off a quiet stretch of US Highway 34, just 3 miles east of Trenton, Nebraska, stands a 35-foot tall shaft of Minnesota pink granite.  Near the top of the 91-ton monument is a carving of a Sioux warrior named John Grass facing west, and a Pawnee brave named Ruling His Son stares east.  The quiet prairie that surrounds the monument gives little hint at the events of August 5, 1873—the last battle between Great Plains Indians in North America that gave this location its name—Massacre Canyon.


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    • 7 min
    Lazy Kate - Texas Jack's Favorite Rifle

    Lazy Kate - Texas Jack's Favorite Rifle

    Texas Jack on the “Wide Range”—The History of Lazy Kate

    (Chicago Field - Saturday, March 19, 1881)

    By Texas Jack


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    • 14 min
    The Cow-Boy by Texas Jack

    The Cow-Boy by Texas Jack

    From The Spirit of the Times, March 24, 1877.  Written by Texas Jack, this piece was included in the show programs for Buffalo Bill's Wild West as an introduction to the cowboy.


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    • 12 min
    Daring Donald McKay

    Daring Donald McKay

    There are many names that one might think of when they consider Texas Jack on stage.  The earliest exploits with Buffalo Bill Cody and Ned Buntline, the spark with costar Giuseppina Morlacchi that developed into romance and marriage, drinking fake whisky with Wild Bill Hickok on stage, going through thick and thin with “Arizona John” Burke.  But one fascinating costar that has been largely lost to history is Donald McKay.


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    Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/dime-library/support

    • 11 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
2 Ratings

2 Ratings

Matt from Chattanooga ,

Westerns

I mean, why not?

Yes, I'm reviewing this, because I still think its a really good idea. These stories remain fun and entertaining. Even though they were only a dime, they're now free to listen to. What a value!

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