273 episodes

Best-selling author Whitney Johnson (“Disrupt Yourself”) explores her passion for personal disruption through engaging conversations with disruptors. Each episode of this podcast reveals new insights about how we work, learn, and live.

Disrupt Yourself Podcast with Whitney Johnson Whitney Johnson

    • Business
    • 4.9 • 354 Ratings

Best-selling author Whitney Johnson (“Disrupt Yourself”) explores her passion for personal disruption through engaging conversations with disruptors. Each episode of this podcast reveals new insights about how we work, learn, and live.

    Susan Cain: The Upside of Seeking Sadness

    Susan Cain: The Upside of Seeking Sadness

    Nobody wants to be sad. We actively avoid it, and use all the technology in our power to distract ourselves from it. But Susan Cain says, maybe we should seek sadness out.
    She knows a thing or two about it. Her books about introversion and quiet reflection are New York Times bestsellers, and her TED talk has been viewed 40 million times.
    Her latest book, "Bittersweet: How Sorrow and Longing Make Us Whole," is about what we miss when we stop confronting sad feelings. Susan explains that reflecting on pain -- including the pain of others -- is something we need more of in our lives, especially in a digital world, where we increasingly only see vacation photos, smiling kids, and job promotions.
    This practice can be about deep personal connection, or simply seeking a sad song or choosing a heartbreaking movie once in a while. After all, there's a reason history's most enduring art is about longing and loss.
    This episode references Whitney's recent newsletter, which you can read (and subscribe to!) here: 
    No Time Like the Present
     

    • 32 min
    Roger Martin: The Single Worst Thing You Can Say to an Employee

    Roger Martin: The Single Worst Thing You Can Say to an Employee

    "The way we've always done it" is often not the best way. This is the very definition of disruption, but getting "stuck" on old habits can sneak up on us — in our personal lives, and our companies.
    That's what Roger Martin explores in his latest book, "A New Way to Think." Roger has built his career as an author and professor studying disruption, mainly identifying business models that we've relied on for decades, and then asking, "Does this really work?"
    Roger returns to the show for another rousing discussion about career satisfaction and employee retention, especially in the wake of "The Great Resignation." He also contends that we've structured modern knowledge work too rigidly, and why that can stifle innovation.
    He also shares the single most discouraging phrase you could ever say to a member of your team, and how to avoid it.

    • 51 min
    Marshall Goldsmith: If You Want Happiness, Redefine Your Success

    Marshall Goldsmith: If You Want Happiness, Redefine Your Success

    Achieving something that's important to you: That's probably a big reason you're listening to this podcast. But what is it about success that drives us? Do we achieve for its own sake, or is there something more?
    That's what Marshall Goldsmith is exploring. He's one of the most recognized thinkers and writers on the topic of leadership, but in his latest book, "The Earned Life," he asks: Why are we doing all this? Does success really make us happy? And what if those two things were not so deeply connected?
    Whitney and Marshall sit down for a conversation that turns traditional Western views of success and happiness on their head. He notes that some of the most successful leaders are great at delaying gratification, only to look back on what they missed out on in life. In fact, after we accomplish something great, we should stop expecting more, but default to a new beginning.

    • 37 min
    Patrick McGinnis: FOMO Isn't Always Bad (Until It Is)

    Patrick McGinnis: FOMO Isn't Always Bad (Until It Is)

    "Fear of Missing Out" or "FOMO" is wired into our brains for a reason. When our ancestors flocked to greener pastures, it was advantageous to follow. FOMO can inform modern, strategic decisions as well, but Patrick McGinnis says we should be vigilant against its more dangerous sibling, FOBO: "Fear of Better Options."
    This is a kind of decision paralysis that's catastrophic for personal well-being and companies. Patrick has studied it closely. After all, he invented the term "FOMO" back in 2004, written multiple books on the topic, and hosts the podcast FOMO Sapiens.
    He and Whitney discuss how the breakneck speed of 21st century FOMO can trick us into "fear-based decision making," and why outsourcing low-stakes choices to Siri or a coin flip can be incredibly liberating.

    • 50 min
    John David Mann & Ana Gabriel Mann: 5 Secrets to Improve Any Relationship

    John David Mann & Ana Gabriel Mann: 5 Secrets to Improve Any Relationship

    John David Mann is a writer and the co-author of more than 30 books. Ana Gabriel Mann is a professional therapist, speaker and coach. Together, they’ve been married for more than 25 years, which also happens to be the subject of their latest work.
    The Go-Giver Marriage is rooted in a framework of gratitude, kindness and self-disruption that John has been writing about for years. When Ana thought to apply this to relationships, it was a “light bulb” moment for both of them.
    They join Whitney to discuss the 5 secrets that don't just apply to relationships in trouble, but can help an already good relationship (marriage or professional) become great.

    • 57 min
    Jami & Jeffery Downs: Why Tiny, Laughable Steps Lead to Huge Achievements

    Jami & Jeffery Downs: Why Tiny, Laughable Steps Lead to Huge Achievements

    Running a marathon, writing a book, or learning piano. These are big undertakings that require discipline and practice. The harder we work each day, the faster we'll succeed, right?
    Wrong, say authors and podcasters Jami and Jeffery Downs. Biting off more than our daily chew can lead to a cycle of discouragement. Instead, commit to laughably small steps: Write one sentence a day. Practice for five minutes. These micro goals are much easier to sustain, and when you keep the streak going, you'll find that sentences turn into pages, and minutes turn into skills.
    A revelation in their personal lives lead this husband and wife team to develop "Streaking," a philosophy of personal accountability that applies to anything: Learning, personal relationships, and health.
    Jami and Jeffery speak with Whitney about the myths of habit forming, and why some tasks — no matter how often you repeat them — will never become automatic.

    • 1 hr 5 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
354 Ratings

354 Ratings

oliviabaker13 ,

A feed-favorite!

Disrupt Yourself is a favorite in my feed! I'm consistently impressed by the engaging conversations, insightful content, and actionable ideas. Not to mention, Whitney is consistently giving us a masterclass on what it means to be a fantastic interviewer. My sincere thanks to Whitney and her podcast team for putting this fabulous show out into the world!

tytiemae ,

It ain’t over ’til it’s over

This podcast is changing my life. Currently, I am in a job that does not appreciate talent, but treats everyone the same. This model was detailed in the recent podcast with Roger Martin. As I watch other companies appreciate their employees with advancement, training, pay increases, and the like, the company I work for does nothing but pour on demands and raise expectations. The general attitude is, if you don't like it, you can leave, so why don't I? I just turned 60 and I'm single, that's why. I feel the reset for me has passed. Through listening to this podcast, however, I feel the puff of a second wind. Maybe I, too, can get on the S-curve and be propelled into something I truly enjoy and to who I truly want to be. I will continue to listen in the hopes of finding the path that shows me that my life isn't over but is waiting for me around the next bend.

Arnold Howard ,

Great!

Whitney Johnson is a superb interviewer and one of the best deep listeners. Especially in today’s world, listening is as important as communicating.

Whitney develops rapport with her guests, because she is interested in every one of them. She wants to learn from them.

Her interview with Bob Proctor was more insightful than his own seminars. He would have agreed, with a laugh, if he were here to read my review.

Her podcast of Tom Peters is probably the best podcast I’ve ever heard. That says a lot, because I’m a podcast junkie. I laughed through much of the podcast while listening through earbuds at the gym.

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