59 episodes

Podcast highlighting people working for social change. Interviews with social workers and those in related fields, educators, and activists about their work and personal stories of how they got into this work. Hosted by Shimon Cohen, LCSW.

Doin' The Work: Frontline Stories of Social Change Shimon Cohen

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.8 • 103 Ratings

Podcast highlighting people working for social change. Interviews with social workers and those in related fields, educators, and activists about their work and personal stories of how they got into this work. Hosted by Shimon Cohen, LCSW.

    Creating Culturally Safe Spaces for Indigenous Populations - Turquoise Skye Devereaux, MSW

    Creating Culturally Safe Spaces for Indigenous Populations - Turquoise Skye Devereaux, MSW

    Episode 59Guest: Turquoise Skye Devereaux, MSWHost: Shimon Cohen, LCSW
    www.dointhework.comListen/Subscribe on: Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, SpotifyFollow on Twitter & Instagram, Like on FacebookJoin the mailing listSupport the podcastDownload transcript
    We are now offering our Racial Justice & Liberatory Practice Continuing Education Series at Columbia University, Michigan State University, and the University of Houston. Join us!
    Thank you to this episode’s sponsor! The University of Houston has a phenomenal social work program that offers face-to-face master's and doctorate degrees, as well as an online and hybrid MSW. They offer one of the country’s only Political Social Work programs and an Abolitionist Focused Learning Opportunity. Located in the heart of Houston, the program is guided by their bold vision to achieve social, racial, economic, and political justice, local to global. In the classroom and through research, they are committed to challenging systems and reimagining ways to achieve justice and liberation. Go to http://www.uh.edu/socialwork to learn more.
    In this episode, I talk with Turquoise Skye Devereaux, a member of the Salish and Blackfeet Tribes of Montana, owner of the consulting company Indigenous Skye, LLC, where she does a range of trainings, workshops, and speaking focused on creating culturally safe spaces for Indigenous populations as well as work with Indigenous youth and tribal communities. She also works in higher education in retention of Native students and is a PhD student in the School of Social Work at Arizona State University. Turquoise talks about colonial systems and the four stages of colonization, as well as systemic racism and oppression, and specific ways education and social work have caused–and continue to cause–harm to Indigenous Peoples and other marginalized groups. We get into how cultural competency is a myth based in a Westernized, colonial mentality, and how it does more harm than good. Turquoise explains differences between Indigenous and Westernized worldviews and ways of living. She shares ways to create cultural safe spaces for Indigenous populations, providing examples from her own life, as well as interviews she has done with Indigenous students, in terms of ways they did not feel included in school systems, and how professors, administrators, and staff made a difference–and can make a difference–in creating safety, equity, and inclusion. I hope this conversation inspires you to action.
    Instagram: indigenous.cc & cahokiaphxLinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/turquoisedevereauxEmail: t.s.devereaux@gmail.com

    • 1 hr 16 min
    Organizing to End the School-to-Prison Pipeline - Jewel Patterson, MS; Edgar Ibarria; Nicole Bates, JD

    Organizing to End the School-to-Prison Pipeline - Jewel Patterson, MS; Edgar Ibarria; Nicole Bates, JD

    Episode 58Guests: Jewel Patterson, MS; Edgar Ibarria; Nicole Bates, JDHost: Shimon Cohen, LCSW
    www.dointhework.comListen/Subscribe on: Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, SpotifyFollow on Twitter & Instagram, Like on FacebookJoin the mailing listSupport the podcastDownload transcript
    We are now offering our Racial Justice & Liberatory Practice Continuing Education Series at Columbia University, Michigan State University, and the University of Houston. Join us!
    Thank you to this episode’s sponsor! The University of Houston has a phenomenal social work program that offers face-to-face master's and doctorate degrees, as well as an online and hybrid MSW. They offer one of the country’s only Political Social Work programs and an Abolitionist Focused Learning Opportunity. Located in the heart of Houston, the program is guided by their bold vision to achieve social, racial, economic, and political justice, local to global. In the classroom and through research, they are committed to challenging systems and reimagining ways to achieve justice and liberation. Go to http://www.uh.edu/socialwork to learn more.
    In this episode, I talk with Jewel Patterson, Edgar Ibarria, and Nicole Bates about their work organizing to end the school-to-prison pipeline in California. Jewel is a lead organizer with COPE, Congregations Organized for Prophetic Engagement, a Black-led, faith-based, grassroots nonprofit in the Inland Empire. Edgar is a senior lead organizer with CADRE, a parent-led organization in South L.A. Nicole is a movement lawyer with C4LL, The Collective for Liberatory Lawyering. They define the school-to-prison pipeline and explain how criminalization functions in schools, disproportionately affecting Black and Brown students and families. Jewel and Edgar share how they organize with students and families, as well as examples of the ways students and families are impacted. Nicole discusses the legal issues and strategies that she and other C4LL lawyers use to challenge and change legislation. We talk specifically about their work to change the law on the school discipline category called “willful defiance”, which is a vague term allowing suspensions and expulsions for “disrupting school activities or otherwise willfully defying the authority of school staff.” This change has resulted in fewer suspensions and expulsions in lower grades, yet it needs to be expanded to upper grades and high school, so the work continues. They discuss surveillance in schools, metal detectors, police in schools, the lack of counseling, and how they organize to change all of this and reimagine safety, including the victory of defunding school police 25 million dollars and reinvesting that money in a Black student achievement program. They explain how they build power, the importance of coalitions, movement lawyers, and some of the successes, as well as challenges, of their efforts. They cover so much and really break it down in ways that can provide a blueprint for others. I hope this conversation inspires you to action.Jewel Patterson, COPEIG: JustJewel__www.COPEsite.orgIG: COPE2000_Facebook: COPE Inland EmpireEdgar Ibarria, CADREwww.cadre-la.orgIG: cadreparentsTwitter: @CADREparentsFacebook: Community Asset Development Re-defining Education (CADRE)Nicole Bates, C4LL, The Collective for Liberatory Lawyeringwww.c4ll-ca.orgIG: liberatorylawyerscaLinkedIn @The Collective for Liberatory Lawyering

    • 1 hr 20 min
    Race Doesn’t Exist Without Racism - Deadric Williams, PhD

    Race Doesn’t Exist Without Racism - Deadric Williams, PhD

    Episode 57Guest: Deadric Williams, PhDHost: Shimon Cohen, LCSW
    www.dointhework.comListen/Subscribe on: Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, SpotifyFollow on Twitter & Instagram, Like on FacebookJoin the mailing listSupport the podcastDownload transcript
    We are now offering our Racial Justice & Liberatory Practice Continuing Education Series at Columbia University, Michigan State University, and the University of Houston. Join us!
    Much thanks to our episode’s sponsors!
    Check out idealist.org, a site for nonprofit and social-impact jobs. So, if you’re looking for a job that makes a difference or looking to hire, check out idealist.org, a site for nonprofit and social-impact jobs. They’ve got thousands of excellent listings, along with tools to help your organization find the right talent. I know a number of Doin’ The Work followers are at organizations looking to hire, and we also have students and professionals in our audience who are looking for the right place to work. If you’re a job seeker, remember that idealist.org is always free for you to use. And for hiring organizations, use the code idealist.org/thework to claim your credit for one free 30-day job listing.
    The University of Houston has a phenomenal social work program that offers face-to-face master's and doctorate degrees, as well as an online and hybrid MSW. They offer one of the country’s only Political Social Work programs and an Abolitionist Focused Learning Opportunity. Located in the heart of Houston, the program is guided by their bold vision to achieve social, racial, economic, and political justice, local to global. In the classroom and through research, they are committed to challenging systems and reimagining ways to achieve justice and liberation. Go to http://www.uh.edu/socialwork to learn more.
    In this episode, I talk with Dr. Deadric Williams, who is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at the University of Tennessee Knoxville, where he’s been since January 2020. We discuss racism, race, and racialization. Dr. Williams explains how the concept of race comes out of racism, and that many people often approach this the other way around, as if race came first. He breaks down how racism is a combination of ideology and structures, such as laws, policies, and social practices that support the hierarchical dominance of people racialized as White, and oppression of people racialized as Black, Indigenous, and People of Color. Dr. Williams emphasizes that the belief in classifying humans into groups according to race is a racist belief that served, and continues to serve, to justify the oppressive practice of European settler colonialism taking land from Indigenous Peoples and enslaving Africans for labor. We discuss how creating whiteness was a means to split oppressed groups by this new category of race, and the way this functioned –and functions– by providing White people with material and psychology benefits at the expense of Black people. Dr. Williams goes in-depth with how racism and racialization function in the larger society, particularly the coding that is used in place of overt racism, affecting the health and well-being of people and families, and ways to identify the mechanisms of racial inequities in the U.S. We need to have a clear understanding that racism leads to race and this overall process so that we can adequately address it. I hope this conversation inspires you to action.
    Twitter: @doc_thoughtswww.deadricwilliams.wordpress.com

    • 1 hr 12 min
    Addressing Racism in Social Work Licensing #StopASWB - Charla Yearwood, LCSW; Cassandra Walker, LCSW, CCTP; Alan Dettlaff, PhD, MSW

    Addressing Racism in Social Work Licensing #StopASWB - Charla Yearwood, LCSW; Cassandra Walker, LCSW, CCTP; Alan Dettlaff, PhD, MSW

    Episode 56Guests: Charla Yearwood, LCSW; Cassandra Walker, LCSW, CCTP; Alan Dettlaff, PhD, MSWHost: Shimon Cohen, LCSW
    www.dointhework.comListen/Subscribe on: Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, SpotifyFollow on Twitter & Instagram, Like on FacebookJoin the mailing listSupport the podcastDownload transcript
    We are now offering our Racial Justice & Liberatory Practice Continuing Education Series at Columbia University, Michigan State University, and the University of Houston. Join us!
    Thank you to this episode’s sponsor! UH has a phenomenal social work program that offers face-to-face master's and doctorate degrees, as well as an online and hybrid MSW. They offer one of the country’s only Political Social Work programs and an Abolitionist Focused Learning Opportunity. Located in the heart of Houston, the program is guided by their bold vision to achieve social, racial, economic, and political justice, local to global. In the classroom and through research, they are committed to challenging systems and reimagining ways to achieve justice and liberation. Go to http://www.uh.edu/socialwork to learn more.
    In this episode, I talk with Charla Yearwood, Cassandra Walker, and Dr. Alan Dettlaff about the recent report from the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB) where they finally release their social work licensing exam pass rates based on race and age. For years, people have been pushing them to release their pass rates by race, and ASWB denied that they even had this data. The report shows large differences in pass rates by race and provides clear data for what many of us have known is a racially biased exam that significantly discriminates against Black, Latinx, and Indigenous social workers. There have been many questions about what makes this exam racist, and ASWB and others have placed the blame elsewhere. We get into all of that in our discussion. We recorded this podcast so we could quickly get information out to folks about this racist exam and continue to be part of a movement to end this exam. So, please check out the conversation and get involved. There are links below to a #StopASWB petition and a recording of a recent #StopASWB press conference, and resources will be updated as available. I hope this conversation inspires you to action.
    Charla Yearwood, LCSWwww.charlayearwood.comwww.connectedincommunity.orgTwitter: @CharlaYearwood
    Cassandra Walker, LCSW, CCTPwww.i-cch.comTwitter: @MentalWokeInstagram: intersectionsllc
    Alan Dettlaff, PhD, MSWhttps://www.uh.edu/socialwork/Twitter: @AlanDettlaff
    #StopASWB Petition: https://www.change.org/p/aswb-end-discriminatory-social-work-licensing-exams
    #StopASWB Press Conference Recording: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kE_p6b6x06U

    • 1 hr 4 min
    Surviving Racism in Academia - Maxine Davis, MSW, MBA, PhD

    Surviving Racism in Academia - Maxine Davis, MSW, MBA, PhD

    Episode 55Guest: Maxine Davis, MSW, MBA, PhDHost: Shimon Cohen, LCSW
    www.dointhework.comListen/Subscribe on: Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, SpotifyFollow on Twitter & Instagram, Like on FacebookJoin the mailing listSupport the podcastDownload transcript
    We are now offering our Racial Justice & Liberatory Practice Continuing Education Series at Columbia University, Michigan State University, and the University of Houston. Join us!
    Check out the new Doin’ The Work Collection of hoodies, tees, mugs, and tote bags! Rep the podcast you love while doin’ the work.
    Thank you to this episode’s sponsor! UH has a phenomenal social work program that offers face-to-face master's and doctorate degrees, as well as an online and hybrid MSW. They offer one of the country’s only Political Social Work programs and an Abolitionist Focused Learning Opportunity. Located in the heart of Houston, the program is guided by their bold vision to achieve social, racial, economic, and political justice, local to global. In the classroom and through research, they are committed to challenging systems and reimagining ways to achieve justice and liberation. Go to http://www.uh.edu/socialwork to learn more.
    In this episode, I talk with Dr. Maxine Davis, who is an Assistant Professor and the Chancellor’s Scholar of Inclusive Excellence in Intimate Partner Violence Prevention & Intervention at Rutgers School of Social Work. Dr. Davis shares her experiences of the structural and interpersonal anti-Black racism, sexism, and oppression she experienced as tenure track faculty at her previous institution. She is incredibly vulnerable and opens up about when she attempted suicide due to the pain she was experiencing. We talk about specific examples of the varying attacks and racial assaults colleagues and administrators perpetrated on her and others, as well as the lack of any mechanisms for accountability or who you can go to when you’ve tried all forms of redress. This is an issue within individual institutions but also the larger social work profession and higher education as a whole. Dr. Davis shares details that she has not yet publicly shared. She also talks about her plan to create a Green Book, as well as a Red Book, so that faculty and scholars in the job market, particularly Black faculty and scholars, have much more information about these institutions prior to accepting a job offer. I hope this conversation inspires you to action.
    https://drmaxinedavis.com/Twitter: @DrMaxineDavisThe Chronicle of Higher Education article: Why They LeftNature article: Anti-Black practices take heavy toll on mental health

    • 1 hr 33 min
    Trans Rights and Justice in a Time of Anti-Trans Attacks - Daye Pope

    Trans Rights and Justice in a Time of Anti-Trans Attacks - Daye Pope

    Episode 54Guest: Daye PopeHost: Shimon Cohen, LCSW
    www.dointhework.comListen/Subscribe on: Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, SpotifyFollow on Twitter & Instagram, Like on FacebookJoin the mailing listSupport the podcastDownload transcript
    Check out the new Doin’ The Work Collection of hoodies, tees, mugs, and tote bags! Rep the podcast you love while doin’ the work.
    Thank you to this episode’s sponsor! UH has a phenomenal social work program that offers face-to-face master's and doctorate degrees, as well as an online and hybrid MSW. They offer one of the country’s only Political Social Work programs and an Abolitionist Focused Learning Opportunity. Located in the heart of Houston, the program is guided by their bold vision to achieve social, racial, economic, and political justice, local to global. In the classroom and through research, they are committed to challenging systems and reimagining ways to achieve justice and liberation. Go to http://www.uh.edu/socialwork to learn more.
    In this episode, I talk with Daye Pope, Director of Civic Engagement at T.A.K.E. – Trans Advocates Knowledgeable Empowering – located in Birmingham, Alabama, and Pennsylvania. T.A.K.E. was founded by Daroneshia Duncan-Boyd as a peer-support group for trans women of color and has expanded to provide services, advocacy, and organizing. We talk about the current anti-trans legislation sweeping the country and how transphobia is not new, but this current climate is increasingly politically hostile, as the Right uses trans folks as scapegoats and a rallying point for their base. Daye talks about the lack of health care access for transgender people and the multitude of interconnected issues that are barriers to health care, rooted in racism, classism, cisgenderism – white, wealthy, hetero, cisgender, patriarchal normativity. Daye explains how ant-trans legislation is creating multiple issues for trans youth, including targeted harassment, potentially being outed to their parents, and being denied medical care, while health care providers and parents and guardians who support trans youth are being threatened with felonies. Daye explains how puberty blockers work and counters misinformation about hormone therapy and surgery. We also talk about legislation against trans athletes. Daye talks about T.A.K.E.’s civic engagement work, specifically on voting rights for trans folks, especially trans folks of color, and the multiple ways voter suppression occurs. Daye emphasizes the strength and love of the T.A.K.E. community and how they are organizing to provide basic needs yet go beyond by developing leaders who are creating change on multiple levels. Daye speaks to her hope among youth and also shares what her experience was like when she was younger. I hope this conversation inspires you to action.
    www.takebhm.orgTwitter: @takeactioncivFacebook: T.A.K.E. Resource Center https://www.facebook.com/takepeergroup
    https://www.equalityfederation.org/ 

    • 58 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
103 Ratings

103 Ratings

Michael 🎺 ,

Wish I had come across this sooner!

I teach grad students working on their MSSW and this podcast - just 2 episodes in (the recent one on ASWB and the one on SW Cares) and I’m thrilled. For my and my students’ learning. Thank you!!!

HareYoh ,

Decolonizing social work

Shimon and guests do a wonderful job of laying out information in a digestible way. The recent episode of decolonizing social work was particularly enlightening for me. It changed my perspective on social work’s role in society and cause me to begin to brainstorm ideas of what decolonized social work could look like

idkwayne ,

Great podcast

Super informative with awesome guests. Keep up the great Prof Shimon!

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