1 hr 12 min

Dr. Donald Grant/// Fire and Empathy /// Season5:E120 More In Common

    • Society & Culture

Inter-generational trauma is talked about a lot in the context of the oppressed.


 


Our guest, Dr. Donald Grant, has set out to discuss the full impacts of racism through the inter-generational trauma of the oppressor. Not as a matter of sympathy but a matter of completing the picture and truly breaking down the racist institutions and structures of this country.


 


We are all affected by the demons of our past, and Dr. Grant schools us with an in-depth conversation that is well worth the listen.




“We have to be able to be honest and say, white people have been told throughout their generational history that they are better than other people” - Dr. Donald Grant  
 


Dr. Donald E Grant Jr is an Equity, Diversity, Inclusion and Impact practitioner and mental health expert who currently serves in two Executive Director roles: one with his boutique training and consulting firm Mindful Training Solutions and the other at Pacific Oaks College’s Center for Community and Social Impact (CCSI).


 


Dr Grant has a long history of direct mental health service delivery and administrative oversight for foster care systems, education systems and homeless mental wellness services. He is an international speaker and workshop facilitator, film and TV consultant and published author. His two books " A Moon for Us All" and “Black Men, Intergenerational Colonialism and Behavioral Health: A Noose Across Nations” are available now. 


 


Topics we discuss:


Overview of his research
Research on children from family members in the Holocaust.

Intergenerational experience with colonialism.

How white generations have been impacted.




Intergenerational lies of supremacy
Oppressor's role is traumatic.

Racism as an age bracket




Inspiration for research and Occupation
Looking at how this world is moving forward; we are constantly divided.

Struggle within foster care; Darker skin children have a harder time getting adopted.

White children don't have that comparable situation.




Call to action
Be honest how you experience “otherness”.

Acknowledge your biases.

Be willing to participate in the change that's occurring.







References:


“A Moon for Us All”

“Black Men, Intergenerational Colonialism and Behavioral Health: A Noose Across Nations”

Holocaust

Black Lives Matter

Defund the Police

Merriam-Webster; Racism

Hillbilly Elegy


 


Credits:


 


Lead editor + Producer: Ruf Holmes


 


Music:


Main Theme: "Eaze Does It" by Shye Eaze and DJ Rufbeats, a More In Common Podcast Exclusive.


Guest theme:  “Grey to Color” by DJ Rufbeats created as a More In Common Podcast Exclusive.

Inter-generational trauma is talked about a lot in the context of the oppressed.


 


Our guest, Dr. Donald Grant, has set out to discuss the full impacts of racism through the inter-generational trauma of the oppressor. Not as a matter of sympathy but a matter of completing the picture and truly breaking down the racist institutions and structures of this country.


 


We are all affected by the demons of our past, and Dr. Grant schools us with an in-depth conversation that is well worth the listen.




“We have to be able to be honest and say, white people have been told throughout their generational history that they are better than other people” - Dr. Donald Grant  
 


Dr. Donald E Grant Jr is an Equity, Diversity, Inclusion and Impact practitioner and mental health expert who currently serves in two Executive Director roles: one with his boutique training and consulting firm Mindful Training Solutions and the other at Pacific Oaks College’s Center for Community and Social Impact (CCSI).


 


Dr Grant has a long history of direct mental health service delivery and administrative oversight for foster care systems, education systems and homeless mental wellness services. He is an international speaker and workshop facilitator, film and TV consultant and published author. His two books " A Moon for Us All" and “Black Men, Intergenerational Colonialism and Behavioral Health: A Noose Across Nations” are available now. 


 


Topics we discuss:


Overview of his research
Research on children from family members in the Holocaust.

Intergenerational experience with colonialism.

How white generations have been impacted.




Intergenerational lies of supremacy
Oppressor's role is traumatic.

Racism as an age bracket




Inspiration for research and Occupation
Looking at how this world is moving forward; we are constantly divided.

Struggle within foster care; Darker skin children have a harder time getting adopted.

White children don't have that comparable situation.




Call to action
Be honest how you experience “otherness”.

Acknowledge your biases.

Be willing to participate in the change that's occurring.







References:


“A Moon for Us All”

“Black Men, Intergenerational Colonialism and Behavioral Health: A Noose Across Nations”

Holocaust

Black Lives Matter

Defund the Police

Merriam-Webster; Racism

Hillbilly Elegy


 


Credits:


 


Lead editor + Producer: Ruf Holmes


 


Music:


Main Theme: "Eaze Does It" by Shye Eaze and DJ Rufbeats, a More In Common Podcast Exclusive.


Guest theme:  “Grey to Color” by DJ Rufbeats created as a More In Common Podcast Exclusive.

1 hr 12 min

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