52 episodes

The Dublin Festival of History is an annual free festival, brought to you by Dublin City Council, and organised by Dublin City Libraries, in partnership with the Dublin City Council Culture Company. The Festival has gained a reputation for attracting best-selling Irish and international historians to Dublin for a high-profile weekend of history talks and debate. The 2022 Festival will take place in September 2022.
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Dublin Festival of History Podcast Dublin City Council

    • History

The Dublin Festival of History is an annual free festival, brought to you by Dublin City Council, and organised by Dublin City Libraries, in partnership with the Dublin City Council Culture Company. The Festival has gained a reputation for attracting best-selling Irish and international historians to Dublin for a high-profile weekend of history talks and debate. The 2022 Festival will take place in September 2022.
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    Dublin v. Cork: A Tale of Two Eighteenth-Century Cities - A Lecture by David Dickson

    Dublin v. Cork: A Tale of Two Eighteenth-Century Cities - A Lecture by David Dickson

    Dublin City Library and Archive hosts a lecture with David Dickson, titled ‘Dublin v. Cork: A Tale of Two Eighteenth-Century Cities’
    To citizens of Dublin, their city has always been unquestionably the most important urban centre in the country. To citizens of Cork, this has never been entirely accepted. In the eighteenth century both cities far outgrew their medieval shells to become major European ports, each with a vastly expanded population. But they remained very different places, Dublin the political centre and a ‘court city’, Cork the commercial centre and a ‘merchant city’.
    Does this explain why in the tumultuous politics of the 1790s things turned out so very differently in the two cities?
    The Dublin Festival of History is brought to you by Dublin City Council, and organised by Dublin City Libraries, in partnership with Dublin City Council Culture Company.

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    • 1 hr 4 min
    LGBTQ+ and Public History - Richard O’Leary, Maurice J Casey and Kate Drinane in Conversation with Sara Phillips

    LGBTQ+ and Public History - Richard O’Leary, Maurice J Casey and Kate Drinane in Conversation with Sara Phillips

    Welcome to the Dublin Festival of History Podcast, brought to you by Dublin City Council.
    In this episode from the 2021 Dublin Festival of History, we hear from practitioners who have worked on LGBTQ+ in public history, from grassroots projects to archives and museums.
    The speakers are Richard O’Leary, Maurice J Casey and Kate Drinane. The moderator is Sara Phillips.
    The episode was recorded at The Printworks, Dublin Castle on the 10th of October 2021.
    The Dublin Festival of History is brought to you by Dublin City Council, and organised by Dublin City Libraries, in partnership with Dublin City Council Culture Company.

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    • 1 hr 12 min
    If Ever You Go To Dublin Town - Kathryn Milligan and Nicola Pierce in Conversation with Donal Fallon

    If Ever You Go To Dublin Town - Kathryn Milligan and Nicola Pierce in Conversation with Donal Fallon

    Donal Fallon speaks to two writers who have written recent books on the history of Dublin.
    In O’Connell Street: The History and Life of Dublin’s Iconic Street, Nicola Pierce explores the people, the history, the buildings and the stories behind the main street in our capital.
    Kathryn Milligan’s Painting Dublin, 1886-1949: Visualising a Changing City represents the first detailed study of the depiction of Dublin in nineteenth- and twentieth-century art. It demonstrates the important role played by the portrayal and experience of urban life, a role shaped by huge historical, political, and social change.
    The Dublin Festival of History is brought to you by Dublin City Council, and organised by Dublin City Libraries, in partnership with Dublin City Council Culture Company.

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    • 1 hr 2 min
    George III: The Life and Reign of Britain's Most Misunderstood Monarch - Andrew Roberts in Conversation with Lisa Marie Griffith

    George III: The Life and Reign of Britain's Most Misunderstood Monarch - Andrew Roberts in Conversation with Lisa Marie Griffith

    George III, Britain’s longest-reigning king, has gone down in history as ‘the cruellest tyrant of this age’. Andrew Roberts’s new biography takes entirely the opposite view. It portrays George as intelligent, benevolent, scrupulously devoted to the constitution of his country and (as head of government as well as head of state) navigating the turbulence of eighteenth-century politics with a strong sense of honour and duty.
    He was a devoted husband and family man, a great patron of the arts and sciences, keen to advance Britain’s agricultural capacity (‘Farmer George’) and determined that her horizons should be global. He could be stubborn and self-righteous, but he was also brave, brushing aside numerous assassination attempts, galvanising his ministers and generals at moments of crisis and stoical in the face of his descent – five times during his life – into a horrifying loss of mind.
    Andrew Roberts is a biographer and historian of international renown. He is currently Visiting Professor at the Department of War Studies at King’s College, London, and the Roger and Martha Mertz Visiting Research Fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University.
    Lisa Marie Griffith is author of ‘Dublin: Then and Now’ and ‘Stones of Dublin: A History of Dublin in Ten Buildings’ and has published a number of essays on Dublin history. She is co-editor of two edited collections of essays, ‘Leaders of the City: Dublin’s first citizens, 1500–1950’ and ‘Death and Dying in Dublin: 1500 to the Present’.
    The Dublin Festival of History is brought to you by Dublin City Council, and organised by Dublin City Libraries, in partnership with Dublin City Council Culture Company.

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    • 53 min
    The Irish Assassins: Conspiracy, Revenge and the Murders that Stunned an Empire - Julie Kavanagh in Conversation with Roy Foster

    The Irish Assassins: Conspiracy, Revenge and the Murders that Stunned an Empire - Julie Kavanagh in Conversation with Roy Foster

    On a sunlit evening in 1882, Lord Frederick Cavendish and Thomas Burke, Chief Secretary and Undersecretary for Ireland, were ambushed and stabbed to death while strolling through Phoenix Park in Dublin. The murders were carried out by the Invincibles, a militant faction of republicans armed with specially-made surgeon’s blades.
    The murders ended what should have been a turning point in Anglo-Irish relations. A new spirit of goodwill had been burgeoning between Prime Minister William Gladstone and Ireland’s leader Charles Stewart Parnell, with both men forging in secret a pact to achieve peace and independence in Ireland – with the newly appointed Cavendish, Gladstone’s protégé, to play an instrumental role.
    The impact of the Phoenix Park murders was so cataclysmic that it destroyed the pact, almost brought down the government and set in motion repercussions that would last long into the twentieth century.
    Julie Kavanagh is a renowned journalist, former New Yorker London editor, former arts editor of Harpers & Queen and Costa Biography Award finalist.
    Roy Foster is a distinguished Irish historian and academic. He was the Carroll Professor of Irish History from 1991 until 2016 at Hertford College, Oxford.
    The Dublin Festival of History is brought to you by Dublin City Council, and organised by Dublin City Libraries, in partnership with Dublin City Council Culture Company.

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    • 48 min
    Northern Protestants: On Shifting Ground - Susan McKay in Conversation with Martin Doyle

    Northern Protestants: On Shifting Ground - Susan McKay in Conversation with Martin Doyle

    Twenty years on from her critically acclaimed book, ‘Northern Protestants: An Unsettled People’, Susan McKay talks again to the Protestant community in Northern Ireland. The book contains interviews with politicians, former paramilitaries, victims and survivors, business people, religious leaders, community workers, young people, writers and others. 
    It tackles controversial issues, such as Brexit, paramilitary violence, the border, the legacy of the Troubles, same-sex marriage and abortion, RHI, and the possibility of a United Ireland, and explores social justice issues and campaigns, particularly the struggle for LGBTQ+ rights.
    Susan McKay is an award-winning writer and commentator and contributes regularly to print and broadcast media, including Guardian/Observer, New York Times, Irish Times and London Review of Books.
    Martin Doyle is Books Editor of the Irish Times.


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    • 1 hr 12 min

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