8 episodes

"Dialogues on hearing health that you can’t stop thinking about" EarWorm is produced by the National Center for Hearing Assessment and Management (NCHAM - pronounced "en-cham") and is one of many research centers located at Utah State University in Logan, Utah. The mission of NCHAM is to ensure that all infants and young children with hearing loss are identified as early as possible and have access to timely and appropriate audiological, educational, medical intervention, and family support services. NCHAM receives funding from multiple sources to conduct research, training, and technical assistance activities to support and improve newborn and early childhood hearing screening, diagnosis, and early intervention. NCHAM has served as the Early Hearing Detection and Intervention National Technical Resource Center (EHDI NTRC) for many years. The EHDI NTRC is currently funded as a cooperative agreement (U52MC04391) with the Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB) of the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) at the United States Department of Health and Human Services. The work of the EHDI-NTRC is funded in part by a cooperative agreement (U52MC04391) from the Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB) of the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) at the United States Department of Health and Human Services.Any views, thoughts and opinions expressed by participants in EarWorm are solely that of the participants and no endorsement by NCHAM, USU, or MCHB/HRSA is implied or expressed.

EarWorm NCHAM

    • Arts
    • 5.0 • 2 Ratings

"Dialogues on hearing health that you can’t stop thinking about" EarWorm is produced by the National Center for Hearing Assessment and Management (NCHAM - pronounced "en-cham") and is one of many research centers located at Utah State University in Logan, Utah. The mission of NCHAM is to ensure that all infants and young children with hearing loss are identified as early as possible and have access to timely and appropriate audiological, educational, medical intervention, and family support services. NCHAM receives funding from multiple sources to conduct research, training, and technical assistance activities to support and improve newborn and early childhood hearing screening, diagnosis, and early intervention. NCHAM has served as the Early Hearing Detection and Intervention National Technical Resource Center (EHDI NTRC) for many years. The EHDI NTRC is currently funded as a cooperative agreement (U52MC04391) with the Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB) of the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) at the United States Department of Health and Human Services. The work of the EHDI-NTRC is funded in part by a cooperative agreement (U52MC04391) from the Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB) of the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) at the United States Department of Health and Human Services.Any views, thoughts and opinions expressed by participants in EarWorm are solely that of the participants and no endorsement by NCHAM, USU, or MCHB/HRSA is implied or expressed.

    It’s Time to Educate Women about the Risks of Cytomegalovirus (CMV) During Pregnancy

    It’s Time to Educate Women about the Risks of Cytomegalovirus (CMV) During Pregnancy

    Pregnant women are commonly educated about a variety of ways they should take care of themselves in order to have a healthy pregnancy and a healthy baby. Some of the most widely known precautions women are advised about during pregnancy are actually quite rare while one of the greatest risks to the health of a developing fetus remains largely undisclosed to women, cytomegalovirus or CMV which is the leading cause of birth defects.

    The fact that CMV is left out of most conversations health care providers have with pregnant women is especially surprising given that there are relatively simple things pregnant women can do to significantly reduce the risk of their baby contracting it during pregnancy. CMV is a disease infants can be tested for at birth and, if they are found to have it, there is a medication that can reduce, if not prevent altogether, the potential profound effects CMV can have on a child’s development. And yet, this testing is not done as a matter of standard practice either.

    In this episode of EarWorm we will be talking with author, Megan Nix who is the mother of five children, one of whom was born with CMV and who, as a result, is profoundly deaf. We will discuss the importance of preventing CMV, testing for CMV at birth and treating CMV in a timely fashion to prevent the negative effects of the virus on a child’s development.

    • 36 min
    Family-to-Family Support as a key resource when empowering families with children who are deaf or hard of hearing to become informed decision makers

    Family-to-Family Support as a key resource when empowering families with children who are deaf or hard of hearing to become informed decision makers

    The joy of welcoming a new child can be mixed with surprise and various emotions for families learning that their child is deaf or hard of hearing. Suddenly faced with understanding their child's needs and finding ways to support their child’s success, these families are fortunately not alone. A range of dedicated professionals, including audiologists, healthcare providers, teachers of the deaf, speech-language pathologists, and early intervention specialists are ready to support, assist and educate. Each offers unique and crucial support.

    Additionally, the value of parent-to-parent or family to family support is immense, providing not just emotional support to one another but also practical information and guidance and real-life examples of successful approaches to nurturing the growth and development of deaf or hard-of-hearing children. In this episode of Earworm, we delve into the various aspects of family-to-family support and explore how it can significantly benefit families with deaf or hard-of-hearing children, emphasizing the importance of having easy access to this valuable resource early on in the process.

    Janet DesGeorges lives in Boulder, Colorado with her husband, Joe and is mom to three daughters, including Sara, who is deaf/hard of hearing. Janet is a co-founder and Executive Director of Hands & Voices Headquarters, a non-profit parent support and advocacy organization for families who have children who are hard of hearing/deaf.

    Janet is recognized as a national parent leader and has presented worldwide about the experiences of families as they journey through life with a child with deafness or hearing loss. She has authored a number papers, chapters and practical tools that aim to empower families as informed decision makers for their children and has been the principal investigator of several federal grants that help to support the work of Hands and Voices.

    • 32 min
    How will we communicate with our child? Supporting families as they face key questions when their child is diagnosed as deaf or hard of hearing

    How will we communicate with our child? Supporting families as they face key questions when their child is diagnosed as deaf or hard of hearing

    When a child is diagnosed as deaf or hard of hearing, families suddenly face an unexpected and often challenging situation. They have to start navigating a flood of information and start making crucial decisions about how they will be communicating with their child. Although these families often have access to qualified experts for guidance through this process, the support of primary care providers, child care providers, extended family, and friends is also vital. These supporters can be especially helpful to families if they have at least some understanding of the decisions the family is facing and the importance of the family being supported in making choices that seem to be best for their specific child and family at that time. In this episode of EarWorm, we'll explore the critical decisions these families face in the early stages and discuss how others can provide meaningful support.

    Amy Spencer is a speech-language pathologist and coordinator of early intervention and family services at the Maine Educational Center for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing. She is involved with the Maine Newborn Hearing Screening Advisory Board and the Maine Interagency Coordinating Council. Amy actively participates in Earliest Interactions Maine, a program supporting families from hearing screening to early intervention, funded by the Health Resource and Services Administration (HRSA). Her expertise in language and communication development was honed through Gallaudet University's Infant Toddler Family Leadership and Collaboration Certificate Program.

    • 28 min
    The Potential of Preventing the Most Common Non-Genetic Cause of Hearing Loss with a Vaccine featuring Lori Panther, MD

    The Potential of Preventing the Most Common Non-Genetic Cause of Hearing Loss with a Vaccine featuring Lori Panther, MD

    Approximately 40% of early childhood hearing loss and deafness can be attributed to a virus known as cytomegalovirus, usually referred to as CMV. If a pregnant individual contracts CMV, it can be transmitted to the fetus in-utero. Approximately 1 out of every 200 babies is born with CMV of which 90% will present as asymptomatic and will likely go unidentified. Of those it is estimated that 10-15% will experience hearing loss which may be present at birth or develop later in life. CMV is the most common non-genetic cause of hearing loss. In this episode of EarWorm, we will be talking about ways to mitigate the effects of CMV in the early childhood population, with a special focus on a new vaccine that is under investigation.
    Host: William Eiserman, Ph.D.

    • 21 min
    New Frontiers in Universal Hearing Screening: Genetic Screening featuring Eliot Shearer, MD

    New Frontiers in Universal Hearing Screening: Genetic Screening featuring Eliot Shearer, MD

    The newborn hearing screening system known as the Early Hearing Detection and Intervention or EHDI system is lauded as one of the most significant public health achievements of that last several decades.  Approximately 3 in 1000 children are identified with a permanent hearing loss as a result of newborn screening.   Despite the significance of this programmatic achievement it is estimated that the number of children with permanent hearing loss doubles in a few short years following the newborn period. Promising Methods now exist that would allow us to identify many of these children who will develop a hearing loss subsequent to the newborn period. During this episode of EarWorm, we will discuss how the existing newborn hearing screening protocol could be expanded and potentially identify children who may be among those who could develop hearing loss in subsequent months or years after the newborn period.
    Host: William Eiserman, Ph.D.

    • 21 min
    Diagnosing Why? The importance of knowing the cause of a child's hearing loss featuring Eliot Shearer, MD

    Diagnosing Why? The importance of knowing the cause of a child's hearing loss featuring Eliot Shearer, MD

    Increased availability of quality early hearing screening and diagnostic services over the last several decade has been revolutionary. With an early identification of hearing loss parents are able to make important decisions about how to ensure their child will have access to language, one way or another, so that they can thrive in all areas of development. Current technology is also making it increasingly easier to determine the cause of a hearing loss. When the cause of a hearing loss is able to be determined, it can sometimes help to predict the stability of the current hearing status, whether changes in hearing are likely to occur in the future, as well as to anticipate emerging concern in other areas of health or development. Host: William Eiserman, Ph.D.

    • 21 min

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