10 episodes

EJIL: The Podcast! aims to provide in-depth, expert and accessible discussion of international law issues in contemporary international and national affairs.

It features the Editors of the European Journal of International Law and of its blog, EJIL: Talk!

The podcast is produced by the European Journal of Law with support from staff at the Blavatnik School of Government, University of Oxford.

EJIL: The Podcast‪!‬ European Journal of International Law

    • Education
    • 5.0 • 10 Ratings

EJIL: The Podcast! aims to provide in-depth, expert and accessible discussion of international law issues in contemporary international and national affairs.

It features the Editors of the European Journal of International Law and of its blog, EJIL: Talk!

The podcast is produced by the European Journal of Law with support from staff at the Blavatnik School of Government, University of Oxford.

    Episode 10: Whatever happened to International Law & Democracy?

    Episode 10: Whatever happened to International Law & Democracy?

    Whatever happened to https://academic.oup.com/ejil/article/32/1/9/6305932 (International Law and Democracy)? Accompanying the https://academic.oup.com/ejil/issue/32/1 (Symposium) on that question in EJIL issue 32(1), this podcast contains a duel between anti-anti-international-lawand democracy scholar https://www.gla.ac.uk/schools/law/staff/akbarrasulov/ (Akbar Rasulov) and anti-international law and democracy scholar https://law.wayne.edu/profile/aa2216 (Brad Roth). Hosted by EJIL Editor in Chief Sarah Nouwen, they https://academic.oup.com/ejil/article/32/1/49/6272280 (disagree) on the https://academic.oup.com/ejil/article/32/1/17/6263578 (curious fate) of international law and democracy, on the politics of form versus the politics of substance and the role of the international lawyer.

    • 41 min
    Episode 9: Reviewing Book Reviewing

    Episode 9: Reviewing Book Reviewing

    Which author of a legal monograph has not had that frustrating feeling -- Why is my book not getting reviewed (and his or her book is...!)? And yet, in one of the many exquisite paradoxes of academic life, all Book Review editors of legal journals will attest to the difficulty of getting colleagues to accept to do a book review. 'I have to read that book carefully (i.e. going beyond the index and checking if I am cited and whether the engagement with my work is ok) and then write a couple of pages which count for nothing in the current lamentable state of quantitative academic appointments and promotions? Thank you but no thank you is the usual reply. We want our books reviewed but we don't like reviewing books. Or as readers of legal book reviews -- have you ever had the frustrating feeling of 'I want to read about the book and this reviewer is just using it to inflict on us his own thoughts and ideas'. Or the opposite -- if I want to read a description of the book I can go to the publisher's website (or the author's homepage...). Why is this review so bland and lacking in critical bite?
    These are just some of the issues that Cait Storr, Fuad Zarbiyev, EJIL book review editor Christian Tams and EJIL editors in Chief Sarah Nouwen and Joseph Weiler discuss in this EJIL Live! The podcast accompanies issue 31.4 which contains a 'Bumper' Book Review section. At the end of the podcast, plans for another EJIL innovation are revealed…

    • 30 min
    Episode 8: After the Fall

    Episode 8: After the Fall

    In this new series, 'Reckonings with Europe: Pasts and Present', Surabhi Ranganathan and Megan Donaldson host conversations about enduring legacies of empire, capitalism, and racism in international law and the legal academy. Joined by Matthew Smith, Mezna Qato, and Rahul Rao, they open the series with a discussion about statues, less tangible legacies woven into institutions, and the place of law in struggles about pasts and futures.

    • 36 min
    Episode 7: “Walking Back Human Rights in Europe?” An Interview with Laurence Helfer and Erik Voeten

    Episode 7: “Walking Back Human Rights in Europe?” An Interview with Laurence Helfer and Erik Voeten

    In this podcast, EJIL editor Sarah Nouwen interviews Laurence Helfer and Erik Voeten about their article “Walking Back Human Rights in Europe?”, published in EJIL issue 31(3). What does it mean to “walk back human rights”? One day one has a human right and the next day no longer? And how does one assess whether human rights are being walked back? But also: how does one keep a single voice in a co-authored text?

    • 27 min
    Episode 6: Trumping International Law?

    Episode 6: Trumping International Law?

    This episode examines the effects of the four years of the Trump Administration on international law. Dapo Akande is joined by Joseph Weiler, Neha Jain and Chimene Keitner. In their conversation, they explore the impact of the last four years on the future of multilateralism. They discuss the impact of Trump policies on international institutions such as the World Trade Organization and the International Criminal Court. Did those policies simply expose weaknesses in those institutions? How might those weaknesses be remedied, and how will the relationship between those institutions and the US develop over the course of the new Biden administration?

    • 31 min
    Episode 5: Breaking Bad - in a Specific and Limited Way

    Episode 5: Breaking Bad - in a Specific and Limited Way

    In this episode Dapo Akande, Marko Milanovic, Sarah Nouwen and Philippa Webb analyse the Internal Market Bill currently pending before the UK Parliament, which the UK government’s own legal officers admit breaches international law by reneging on parts of the Withdrawal Agreement with the European Union and the Northern Ireland Protocol thereto that the UK had freely entered into less than a year ago. The team discuss why the UK government has put this Bill forward, how it is fairly unique for a state to admit to breaking international law before actually doing so, and why no international legal argument would work to justify this course of action. The team also discuss whether the concept of the rule of law should be bifurcated between the domestic and the international spheres, and what the role of governmental legal advisors should be in such situations.

    • 36 min

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