29 min

Enrich Your Future 03: Persistence of Performance: Athletes Versus Investment Managers My Worst Investment Ever Podcast

    • Investing

In this episode of Enrich Your Future, Andrew and Larry Swedroe discuss Larry’s new book, Enrich Your Future: The Keys to Successful Investing. In this series, they discuss Chapter 03: Persistence of Performance: Athletes Versus Investment Managers.
LEARNING:  The nature of the competition in the investment arena is so different that conventional wisdom does not apply. What works in one paradigm does not necessarily work in another.
 
“Active managers fail with great persistence not because they’re dumb, it’s just that they have a burden of costs, which makes it very difficult for them to outperform and overcome those costs.”Larry Swedroe 
In this episode of Enrich Your Future, Andrew and Larry Swedroe discuss Larry’s new book, Enrich Your Future: The Keys to Successful Investing. The book is a collection of stories that Larry has developed over the 30 years or so that he’s been trying to help investors. Larry is the head of financial and economic research at Buckingham Wealth Partners. You can learn more about Larry’s Worst Investment Ever story on Ep645: Beware of Idiosyncratic Risks.
Larry deeply understands the world of academic research and investing, especially risk. Today, Andrew and Larry discuss Chapter 03: Persistence of Performance: Athletes Versus Investment Managers.
Chapter 03: Persistence of Performance: Athletes Versus Investment ManagersIn this chapter, Larry expounds on why we do not see the persistence of the outperformance of investment managers. He also tries to help investors understand how securities markets set prices.
Skills versus luckOne of the most strongly held beliefs is that successful people succeed not through luck but through the skill of persistence over time. So, people assume that successful active managers must also result from this skill, not just luck. Larry explains that while this may be true for athletes where competition is one-on-one, it is not the case when it comes to investing.
According to Dr. Mark Rubinstein, competition for an investment manager is not other individual investment managers but rather the market’s collective wisdom. Further, Rex Sinquefield states that just because there are some investors smarter than others, that advantage will not show up. The market is too vast and too informationally efficient. Many people fail to comprehend that in many forms of competition, such as chess, poker, or investing, the relative skill level plays the more critical role in determining outcomes, not the absolute level. The “paradox of skill” means that even as skill level rises, luck can become more crucial in determining outcomes if the level of competition also increases.
The cost of outperformanceWhen it comes to outperforming the market, Larry cautions that investment managers are not engaged in a zero-sum game. In pursuing market-beating returns, they face significantly higher expenses than passive investors. These costs, which include research expenses, other fund operating expenses, bid-offer spreads, commissions, market impact costs, and taxes, can pose significant financial risks. Investors must be aware of these potential pitfalls and factor them

In this episode of Enrich Your Future, Andrew and Larry Swedroe discuss Larry’s new book, Enrich Your Future: The Keys to Successful Investing. In this series, they discuss Chapter 03: Persistence of Performance: Athletes Versus Investment Managers.
LEARNING:  The nature of the competition in the investment arena is so different that conventional wisdom does not apply. What works in one paradigm does not necessarily work in another.
 
“Active managers fail with great persistence not because they’re dumb, it’s just that they have a burden of costs, which makes it very difficult for them to outperform and overcome those costs.”Larry Swedroe 
In this episode of Enrich Your Future, Andrew and Larry Swedroe discuss Larry’s new book, Enrich Your Future: The Keys to Successful Investing. The book is a collection of stories that Larry has developed over the 30 years or so that he’s been trying to help investors. Larry is the head of financial and economic research at Buckingham Wealth Partners. You can learn more about Larry’s Worst Investment Ever story on Ep645: Beware of Idiosyncratic Risks.
Larry deeply understands the world of academic research and investing, especially risk. Today, Andrew and Larry discuss Chapter 03: Persistence of Performance: Athletes Versus Investment Managers.
Chapter 03: Persistence of Performance: Athletes Versus Investment ManagersIn this chapter, Larry expounds on why we do not see the persistence of the outperformance of investment managers. He also tries to help investors understand how securities markets set prices.
Skills versus luckOne of the most strongly held beliefs is that successful people succeed not through luck but through the skill of persistence over time. So, people assume that successful active managers must also result from this skill, not just luck. Larry explains that while this may be true for athletes where competition is one-on-one, it is not the case when it comes to investing.
According to Dr. Mark Rubinstein, competition for an investment manager is not other individual investment managers but rather the market’s collective wisdom. Further, Rex Sinquefield states that just because there are some investors smarter than others, that advantage will not show up. The market is too vast and too informationally efficient. Many people fail to comprehend that in many forms of competition, such as chess, poker, or investing, the relative skill level plays the more critical role in determining outcomes, not the absolute level. The “paradox of skill” means that even as skill level rises, luck can become more crucial in determining outcomes if the level of competition also increases.
The cost of outperformanceWhen it comes to outperforming the market, Larry cautions that investment managers are not engaged in a zero-sum game. In pursuing market-beating returns, they face significantly higher expenses than passive investors. These costs, which include research expenses, other fund operating expenses, bid-offer spreads, commissions, market impact costs, and taxes, can pose significant financial risks. Investors must be aware of these potential pitfalls and factor them

29 min