45 episodes

In this Podcast we interview experts on all things Enterprise Excellence, sharing their story and their insights. Experts who believe in achieving sustainable change that betters more than just an organisations' profit line. Experts who help organisations achieve a symbiotic relationship between environment and economics. Experts who believe in a culture of continuous improvement. We share world best practice and knowledge in achieving a win-win outcome for people, profit and the planet. Join us on this journey to excellence and help to create a better world for organisations, people and the planet.

Enterprise Excellence Podcast with Brad Jeavons Brad Jeavons

    • Business
    • 5.0 • 1 Rating

In this Podcast we interview experts on all things Enterprise Excellence, sharing their story and their insights. Experts who believe in achieving sustainable change that betters more than just an organisations' profit line. Experts who help organisations achieve a symbiotic relationship between environment and economics. Experts who believe in a culture of continuous improvement. We share world best practice and knowledge in achieving a win-win outcome for people, profit and the planet. Join us on this journey to excellence and help to create a better world for organisations, people and the planet.

    #45 Run the shop, advance the plan, help my people with Andy Hecke.

    #45 Run the shop, advance the plan, help my people with Andy Hecke.

    Summary Keywordspeople, leaders, run, organisation, excellence, shop, goals, important, leadership, question, pillars, andy, clear, journey, create, achieve, support, pack, plan, business 
    IntroductionWelcome to Episode 45 of the enterprise excellence podcast. It is such a pleasure to have Mr Andy Hecke on the show with me today. Andy has been researching and applying enterprise excellence for many years. Andy's mission is a continuous pursuit of being and achieving more each day communally. And individually, he's passionate about helping others reach their potential and create a better future for themselves, their organisation and their customers. Let's get into the episode. Andy, thank you so much for joining us today.
    Proudly brought to you in association with S A Partners, a world-leading business transformation consultancy.
    The Three Pillars 
    1. Run the shop
    2. Advance the plan
    3. Help my people
    The three pillars were born out of setting a long term goal which is very important for our resilience. But then you turn the goal into 100-meter sprints.  As you go on your sprint, the world's going to shift and change. And so it's really how do you create the focus in that short term space? As a leader, you're going through a continuous cycle of updating information to understand the condition of things and where you're going. Andy applies it weekly and believes you should check off an answer to those three pillars. 



    Two Minute TipThe two minute tip for Andy is time management and understanding what are you doing and why.  And are you doing something that drives that? You need to do an honest audit with yourself; you need to be brutal because you can give yourself many excuses. You have to connect with your purpose to justifying your suffering because there are bad days out there. How do you use time? Try different things. A morning or weekly routine. Regular meetings. Become the artisan crafting your time. You use time or lose it.
    How often do I reflect on my time? 
    And where I'm putting my time? 
    How often do I take a look at my purpose? 
    Or have I even got my purpose defined? 
    And what goal am I chasing longer term?

    We can make a lot of useless stuff efficient. 
     So again, what are we doing? And why are we doing it and having everybody clear on that? That's, that's key to unleashing the power of the pack. 


    Quotes04:06min And you know, I've had good leaders, and I've had not so good leaders, and all of them have provided some sort of insight. You know, I'm always interested in taking some sort of nugget from everything and putting it in my toolbox I guess you could call it.
    Key Takeaways 1.     Run the shop 
    2.     Support your people
    Through these two pillars of Andy’s model he has destilled what I believe are the foundational elements of any excellence journey. Firstly a quality running shop or day to day business. If an organisation has a shop floor or processes that are out of control with quality and safety impacts it will be hard for anyone to put time into delivering a plan. Likewise with my second takeaway, if the people of the organisation are not supported, engaged and aligned to the culture and journey the oganisation is on, achieving any plan and related goals is not going to be easy. Having a meaningful challenging goal with a purpose that people will rally behind can help with this. Just be clear with everyone that the first step is to improve our culture and achieve stability in our operation before we start to take on additional elements of the plan. 

    • 46 min
    #44 How to master facilitation and achieve great group outcomes with Dr. Morgan Jones.

    #44 How to master facilitation and achieve great group outcomes with Dr. Morgan Jones.

    Welcome to Episode 44 of the Enterprise Excellence Podcast. I am so pleased to have Dr Morgan Jones on the show to discuss an essential skill in leading an excellence journey within an organisation. The skill of facilitation. Morgan Jones is a Business Transformation expert who has focused his career on studying and helping organisations achieve sustainable results. Morgan is the author of Sponsor Success, 4+1 and the new book Mastering Facilitation, A Guide for Assisting Teams and Achieving Great Outcomes.

    Proudly brought to you in association with S A Partners, a world-leading business transformation consultancy.

    What does great look like for a facilitator?
    You're pretty drained because you put a lot of energy and passion into it.You feel energised. You think that you've helped.People are animated and active.There are too many actions that will need prioritising.What does great look like for the team? 
    They often don't realise they've been subject to really rigorous and robust techniques and processes. They think, why didn't we decide this earlier? When they don't realise they've gone through a formal facilitation process. They come up with ideas and contribute to the session. They own the outcome. What is your two-minute tip on facilitation and excellence?
    The first tip is to start with the end in mind. And don't try to be perfect. The most important thing is, we're all humans. And you may ask a question and offer a guide, and it may not work. 
    Your role is not to lead them. It's yours to facilitate and guide them. They choose the direction because you've already clearly defined what the purpose is. Start with the end in mind; what is the goal? And what does good look like? Maybe people have taken away actions, or they've got some ideas that they can apply back to their own teams. Essentially, don't try to be perfect or be the expert in the subject matter. So let's elevate yourself as a facilitator. Some audiences are complicated, and that's okay. Don't beat yourself up!


    Quotes02:49min In the forces, you're forever developing your people to be able to step up into your role because you can be as an officer or noncommissioned officer, or, you know, have stripes in the rank wise. If somebody was injured, I could get injured. I need somebody who could step in and still continue the mission. So you're always it wasn't about you, leading from the front all the time, you were forever developing a number of people step up in your role at any moment in time. So it was so you can protect. The other part that was really fascinating about the Navy was, you had a very crystal clear purpose. Serve and protect; that is what we were there for. It wasn't being elaborate, you know, a 20-word expression from some consulting firm. It's you just; you were there to serve and protect. And that was it. So you can relate everything you did to is it helping me serve and protect. And it's quite a simple, empowering purpose.
    LinksBrad is proud to support many Australian businesses. You can find him on LinkedIn here. If you'd like to speak to him about how he can help your business, call him on 0402 448 445 or email bjeavons@iqi.com.au. Our website is www.bradjeavons.com.
    Morgan Jones: LinkedIn
    Book, Amazon: Mastering Facilitation.
    SA Partners

    • 37 min
    #43 I-driven visual leadership with Gwendolyn Galsworth

    #43 I-driven visual leadership with Gwendolyn Galsworth

    Introduction Welcome to Episode 43 of the enterprise excellence podcast. It is such a pleasure to have Dr Gwendolyn Galsworth back on the show with us today. Gwendolyn is a leading researcher, author and coach on workplace visuality. Gwendolyn shared her backstory and knowledge on achieving excellence with frontline teams deploying visual workplaces in Episode 18. Today, we are going to explore her work on visual leadership. Let's get into the episode. Gwendolyn, thank you so much for joining us again.

    Proudly brought to you in association with S A Partners, a world-leading business transformation consultancy.
    I-driven leaders Some leaders are gifted and have not had a chance to demonstrate their gift, but they're still doing well. But what would it be like to be great? Like the thoroughbreds at Monmouth Park that Gwendolyn witnessed when she was small. When they ran, no one needed to whip them, especially if another horse was in the race. They loved the race. They loved the stretch of their legs, powerfully moving them forward, and the wind in their hair. And they won because they wanted to. They are stallions. They were amazing beings, creatures of great strength and great heart. The age of great leaders is not over with, but they do have to find their way back into our communities.
     An executive will make decisions with the teams' input. But first, with their vetting of which type of problem-solving is welcome in their company. The role of the executive is to decide and drive, decide and drive. She can't decide until she knows. So she has to investigate and understand what the lay of the land is. And he can't drive unless he's communicated a clear vision and inspired others to want that vision. Now the executive leader is ready to drive.
     When an executive wants to become a leader, this is a process, and the process is I-driven. But he, she doesn't seek feedback. 
     The leader says to their direct reports, "Now you do the templates (the house and x type planning). And when you've done this and gone through the pain of sitting from 11 pm to 1 am and have given them to me, you can talk to one other person. But that one other person can't be doing this (planning) at the same time." 
     That's the grooming ground for executives; executives must really understand that it is their decision. And they'll receive inputs from qualified collaborators. Gwendolyn has been very successful at creating fierce leaders, like a barracuda on the inside, always hungry for lunch. But whom on the outside have political and social correctness that makes them approachable. 
    Key takeaways 
    I want leadership approachHelping others align their plan

    Links visualworkplace.com and 'contact us' through the web. Gwendolyn is looking for organisations or people who want to go through this process online in small groups. She would love for some executive leaders to look at themselves and say they want to feel greater strength and greater power and greater safety in their own decision-making safety.
    Brad is proud to support many Australian businesses. You can find him on LinkedIn here. If you’d like to speak to him about how he can help your business, call him on 0402 448 445, or email bjeavons@iqi.com.au. Our website is www.bradjeavons.com

    • 48 min
    #42 How to help a supervisor at the frontline develop a great team and achieve company goals, with Hugh Alley.

    #42 How to help a supervisor at the frontline develop a great team and achieve company goals, with Hugh Alley.

    Welcome to Episode 42 of the enterprise excellence podcast. It is such a pleasure to have Mr Hugh Alley with us today, whose passion is helping people become better leaders. He is the author of the new book, "Becoming the supervisor, achieving your company's mission and building your team". I'm so looking forward to this conversation on achieving excellence through such an important leadership position.

    Proudly brought to you in association with S A Partners, a world-leading business transformation consultancy.
    "Becoming the Supervisor, Achieving your Company's Mission and Building your Team"
    Level 1 - what does the supervisor need to learn?
     A fine supervisor has five skills that they should do passively to make the lives of their people better and help achieve the mission of your company. 
    Instruction: Being able to teach someone a new skill. Leading: Addressing the situation when somebody's not performing the way the company needs it. Improvement: Making some improvements in the way that work gets done in your area. Priorities: Knowing what your team members should do first. Listening: You need to be able to listen to understand others.Level 1.1 Instruction: How do you train new skills to frontline workers faster and reduce scrap?
    This level comes from the job instruction module in the 'training within industry' framework. Even if this skill is not done particularly well, as long as it's done, mostly okay, it makes things better. So, knowing how to separate the essential steps, the key points, and the reasons makes a big difference. 
    Level 1.3 Improvement: How do you improve work processes in the areas you are responsible for?

    Hugh talks about the challenge of actually observing what's going on in a workplace in this section. It's also a part of the job methods module from the 'training within industry' framework. The lead character in the book is Trevor, and he's being mentored by his boss, the general manager, Julie. Julie says to him, "Okay, just go out, and write down everything you see happening". And everybody thinks that would be so easy. And they get out there, and they write down some observations. But what you find is that we all gloss over so much and miss the details that give us opportunities for improvements. It might be that extra three steps you always take or when a particular item always needs to be adjusted before use.

    Level 1.5 Listening: How do you listen for understanding?
    All you need to do is think about your relationship with someone special: your spouse, your kids, your parents, or a good friend. And you'll recognise that a vast amount of what's communicated is in the tone and the emotional content. And we get so focused on kind of our business task that we want to rush through all that emotional stuff. But if you've ever had a kid who's had a tantrum, they're not going to hear anything you say until you somehow enfold them in a hug. And let them know that it's okay, and they've been heard. And once the sniffles have mostly subsided, then they might be interested in listening to you. 
    Key Takeaways
    1. Start with the biggest problem. 
    2. Number and sequence instructions in coaching. 
    LinksBrad Jeavons: LinkedIn here. Phone  0402 448 445, or email bjeavons@iqi.com.au. Our website is www.bradjeavons.com
    Hugh Alley: linkedin.com/in/hughalley. His website is https://becomingthesupervisor.com
    SA Partners

    • 46 min
    #41 How product owners in Agile can learn from sales to improve product success, with Vasco Duarte.

    #41 How product owners in Agile can learn from sales to improve product success, with Vasco Duarte.

    Welcome to Episode 41 of the Enterprise Excellence Podcast. It is such a pleasure to have Mr Vasco Duarte on the show with us today. Vasco helps companies generate customer-centric products and get their processes to a level of performance they thought was impossible. Vasco does this by focusing product development teams on the end-to-end life-cycle of their products. From Concept to Cash and Back!
    Vasco is the Author of the book "No Estimates" and daily podcast host at the Scrum Master Toolbox. Vaso gives back to the community every day to improve the IT and product industry worldwide. 
    Proudly brought to you in association with S A Partners, a world-leading business transformation consultancy.


    Product owners can get better outcomes by engaging with sales. 
    Vasco is training product owners to start with their customer's vision for the product, rather than their own or their company's vision. One of the advantages that product owners get from engaging with sales teams is hearing their customers language. 

    The wrong type of interaction - sales led development without the why


    Vasco talks about interactions between salespeople and product owners. The wrong type of interaction is when a salesperson says, "Here's the list of features you need to develop for my customers".  

    The right type of interaction - collaboration and engagement


    The salesperson could be a great source of insight for the product owner.  Great product owners will engage the salesperson to understand the context around that list of features: why are they being requested?
    Salespeople have an incredible mindset in intuitively understanding the customer's business model. Vasco believes that when a product owner can tap into this mindset, they can amplify the customer's business model. But, unfortunately, the majority of the products out there are a burden on customers. They impose tasks or models on the customer rather than help them succeed. 
    Key Takeaways

    Focus on how we can serve - Focus on serving other teams in our business as well as external customers, establishing a culture of collaboration, continuous improvement and innovation.

    Minimal viable experiment - provides a simple, fast way to test our theories on how we can improve and learn from this. The MVE concept is about developing the minimal viable approach to product development or improvement to share with a customer and gain their thoughts and feedback. 


    Quotes16:05min There's only one phrase in your customer's mind. And that phrase is there all the time. And the phrase goes like this. What have you done for me lately? And they ask that question from your product every single time they interact with your product. And your product needs to shout that answer all the time. What have you done for me lately? Right? And, of course, it has to be designed with that question in mind, right? We don't add features to a product. We solve problems for a customer.
    Links
    Brad - Brad is proud to support many Australian businesses. You can find him on LinkedIn here. If you’d like to speak to him about how he can help your business, call him on 0402 448 445, or email bjeavons@iqi.com.au. Our website is www.bradjeavons.com
    Vasco - LinkedIn and the Scrum Master Toolbox.
    SA Partners

    • 33 min
    #40 Learn how to organise your business with an IT, Agile & Scrum legend, James Coplien.

    #40 Learn how to organise your business with an IT, Agile & Scrum legend, James Coplien.

    IntroductionIt is such a pleasure to have on the show today Dr James Coplien. James is a writer, lecturer and researcher in the fields of computer science. He is known for his work on patterns in software, program design. James and Jeff Sutherland and 18 co-authors published the book titled "A Scrum Book, The spirit of the game". This book outlines many of the key patterns of success in achieving high-performance teams. Let's get into the episode. James, thank you so much for joining me today.  
    Proudly brought to you in association with S A Partners, a world-leading business transformation consultancy.


    Quotes05:59min Then we started noticing, if you look at the pictures of these social networks, there are certain configurations that arise again and again in sick organisations. Like highly, highly centralised controlled by managers, or disconnected roles, or time serial sequences. And there are patterns that, that recur in successful organisations, and notably, the pattern that recurred in successful organisations is what I called the mess pattern: it had no recognisable structure.
    08:03min And it reminded him, he said, If this were a Gantt chart, or a pie chart, everything all the tasks should be overlapping and reminded him of sashimi on a bowl of rice, overlapping pieces of fish, like overlapping tasks. On a pie chart, we thought, what's the human equivalent of sashimi? And he thought, well, it's people overlapping each other, like people with their arms around each other's shoulders, like a scrum in rugby. And that's where the word Scrum comes from.
    Key Take Aways

    1. Patterns of high-performance teams are all about people, and they are a natural social phenomenon.

    James mentioned that the patterns of high-performance teams and organisations they have defined are people-based. They are natural patterns based on human traits. James said the swarming pattern, small groups of differently skilled team members gathering regularly to plan, overcome challenges and move forward towards their goal. I have seen this pattern occur in a crisis within highly bureaucratic organisations. The crisis creates collaboration and a swarming approach. Unfortunately, when the crisis is over, people go back to their silos and traditional practices. James provides a great tip around forming small pilot teams or even separate organisations of small groups focused on a new innovative approach and product.
    2. Autonomous self-organisation at the front line is key to success.
    Autonomy is part of human nature. We all want to be able to create, contribute and play a role in our future. Autonomous small front line teams that have within them the skills and capabilities needed to create excellent outcomes for customers are naturally going to be highly agile and innovative. They are all close to the customer; they have the skills and capability to create and deliver excellent outcomes for customers within their small group. These teams are empowered, motivated and can directly see the results of the work they do for customers. Startup companies evolve from small autonomous front line teams. Unfortunately, as many of these companies grow, they lose this culture. As James mentioned during the show, this does not have to be the case.
    Links
    Brad is proud to support many Australian businesses. You can find him on LinkedIn here. If you’d like to speak to him about how he can help your business, call him on 0402 448 445, or email bjeavons@iqi.com.au. Our website is www.bradjeavons.com
    James' LinkedIn Profile: linkedin.com/in/coplien

    • 50 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
1 Rating

1 Rating

Top Podcasts In Business