649 episodes

A weekly podcast featuring the leading thinkers in business and management.

HBR IdeaCast Harvard Business Review

    • Business
    • 4.3 • 1.6K Ratings

A weekly podcast featuring the leading thinkers in business and management.

    Companies Can Win by Reducing Overwork

    Companies Can Win by Reducing Overwork

    Organizations regularly reward devoted workers who put in long hours. At the same time, “always-on” communication spurred by the pandemic and new digital tools encourage workaholism. But research shows that it’s not just individuals who are harmed by overworking. Their employers are, too. Malissa Clark, associate professor and head of the Healthy Work Lab at the University of Georgia, explains how companies unwittingly create a workaholic culture — one that ultimately backfires with higher turnover and disengaged employees. She shares what companies can easily do to change that. Clark wrote the new book Never Not Working: Why the Always-On Culture Is Bad for Business--and How to Fix It.

    • 26 min
    When Should Companies Weigh in on Contentious Issues?

    When Should Companies Weigh in on Contentious Issues?

    In a globally connected and highly politicized world, organizations are increasingly expected to comment on social, political, and environmental issues. But taking a stance doesn't always make business sense and can backfire when employees or consumers see a disconnect between leaders’ words and actions. Alison Taylor, associate professor at New York University, says there's a better way to make decisions on corporate speech, which includes involving workers in the process. Taylor is the author of the HBR book Higher Ground: How Business Can Do the Right Thing in a Turbulent World and the HBR article “Corporate Advocacy in a Time of Social Outrage.”

    • 29 min
    Stuck on a Problem? Try Switching Up Your Approach

    Stuck on a Problem? Try Switching Up Your Approach

    Many leaders confidently go about tackling challenges. After all, relying on their experience got them to where they are. But taking the same approach over and over again can actually hold you back. Sometimes you need to switch up your tactics to break through to the next level. Decision-making expert Cheryl Strauss Einhorn says the first step is to understand your personal problem-solving style. Then she explains a framework to assess the situation and select the best approach. Einhorn is founder and CEO of Decisive. She also wrote the book Problem Solver: Maximizing Your Strengths to Make Better Decisions and the HBR article “When Your Go-To Problem-Solving Approach Fails.”

    • 25 min
    How to Reduce the Friction that Hurts You — and Harness the Friction that Helps

    How to Reduce the Friction that Hurts You — and Harness the Friction that Helps

    Organizations too often subject their employees and customers to unnecessary friction that creates inefficiency and causes frustration. But, in some situations, friction can be a positive force, spurring more innovation and better decision-making. So how do you reduce the bad kind and embrace the good?  Stanford professors Bob Sutton and Huggy Rao have studied this problem for seven years and offer strategies for leaders at every level to help them recognize when friction is needed or not and then add or subtract accordingly. They share ample examples of people and companies getting it right. Sutton and Rao are the authors of The Friction Project: How Smart Leaders Make the Right Things Easier and the Wrong Things Harder, as well as the HBR article, "Rid Your Organization of Obstacles that Infuriate Everyone."

    • 29 min
    What the New Freelance Economy Means for Your Talent Strategy

    What the New Freelance Economy Means for Your Talent Strategy

    The rapid pace of technological change is making a big impact on hiring. Some organizations are dynamically securing freelance workers through platform apps like Upwork and Freelancer. Other companies are investing heavily in work enabled by artificial intelligence. John Winsor and Jin Paik say these structural changes call for a reimagining of your talent strategy — one that is open to flexible, project-based work for talent inside or outside your organization — and they explain how to go about it. Winsor is the founder and chair of Open Assembly and an executive-in-residence at the Laboratory for Innovation Science at Harvard. Paik is a cofounder and managing partner at the AI consultancy Altruistic and a visiting research scientist at Harvard Business School. Together, they wrote the book Open Talent: Leveraging the Global Workforce to Solve Your Biggest Challenges and the HBR article "Do You Need an External Talent Cloud?"

    • 30 min
    Making Peace with Your Midlife, Mid-career Self

    Making Peace with Your Midlife, Mid-career Self

    Research shows that happiness bottoms out for people in their mid to late 40s. We might struggle with mid-career slumps, caring for both children and aging parents, and existential questions about whether everything has turned out as we'd planned. But Chip Conley says we can approach this phase of our personal and profesional lives with a different perspective. He's a former hospitality industry CEO and founder of the Modern Elder Academy, and he explains how to reframe our thinking about middle age, find new energy, and become more fulfilled and successful people at work and home. Conley wrote the book Learning to Love Midlife: 12 Reasons Why Life Gets Better with Age.

    • 29 min

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5
1.6K Ratings

1.6K Ratings

Eddie J. Soto ,

4 business ideas episode was great!

I love the panel discussing productivity in the workplace and its history definition. It's hilarious how much it has changed.

Private Citizen 2.0 ,

This is a political podcast disguised as a business podcast

HBR is captured by a “woke” ideology. It’s no longer focused on business success.

H&B 125 ,

Let the Golden Rule help

Re: you podcast on rude customer behavior

It does seem we live in an angrier society and I appreciate hearing Ms. Porath’s well studied insights.

After listening I took a moment to ponder your conversation and was reminded of the Golden Rule: “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you”. Reminders of this simple but always effective behavior have faded in our society.

Perhaps recreating widespread awareness of the Golden Rule is another strategy to remind our over stressed society to be civil at all times.

Thanks for a thought provoking podcast.

Curt Vapor

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