38 episodes

Work can be frustrating. How can you get along with that maddening coworker? Figure out what your unapproachable boss really wants? Motivate your demoralized team? "Dear HBR:" is here to help. With empathy, experience, and humor, veteran Harvard Business Review editors and co-hosts Alison Beard and Dan McGinn explore solutions to your workplace dilemmas. Bolstered by insights from guests and academic research, they help you navigate thorny situations to find a better way forward.

Dear HBR: Harvard Business Review

    • Business
    • 4.5, 417 Ratings

Work can be frustrating. How can you get along with that maddening coworker? Figure out what your unapproachable boss really wants? Motivate your demoralized team? "Dear HBR:" is here to help. With empathy, experience, and humor, veteran Harvard Business Review editors and co-hosts Alison Beard and Dan McGinn explore solutions to your workplace dilemmas. Bolstered by insights from guests and academic research, they help you navigate thorny situations to find a better way forward.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5
417 Ratings

417 Ratings

lynda726 ,

Different perspectives

The Q&A gives different perspectives that can help shape your own lesson or efforts for your situation. The hosts challenge each other’s points to give a wholistic view of the scenario and always goes back to the question(s) to ensure they are responding to it. I think the hosts are insightful and I really enjoy this podcast!!

Jason W Miller ,

Best Business Podcast

This is the best business podcast out there. Topical, relevant and brilliant. I’ve learned so much that I apply to my current work life.

jinsightr ,

I really want to like this but

I feel like this podcast has the right intent, but its hosts and guests come across as sorely lacking the insight and experience necessary to give qualified advice on being in a modern workplace. Their responses to many of the situations discussed, usually by blaming the letter writer and ponying up ideal but truly unrealistic “solutions” to those problems can come across as downright ignorant and callous. It’s abundantly clear how little experience the hosts have in enduring their own career hardships, and it’s truly shocking at times how little empathy or genuine helpfulness they provide some of the situations discussed.

As one example, in the recent job hopping episode, their “advice” was to blame the writer for lacking “emotional intelligence” for getting into a difficult work culture, to recommend he go into therapy, and then to quote examples of how people they knew apparently were able to do a week long “trial” of a job before starting. I really have to wonder, what kind of fantastic job world do these people live in? I’ve received a number of job offers across industries, and a trial week is so laughable and implausible for most careers (ever heard of confidentiality agreements or MNPI?) that it’s offensive this was brought out as advice.

I do like the topics covered, and just really wish the people dishing the advice had real work experience rather than just academic study. Working at HBR and academia in general is probably not a good reflection of the average American’s work environment or struggles, and that’s all too clear as you listen to this. Hopefully they will take this feedback and try to invite folks with true work experience, and not just people who have “studied” working.

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