42 min

EP 11 - Peanuts Ain't Nuts Foodie Pharmacology

    • Science

Join Cassandra and Chef Steven Satterfield and they talk about even's favorite, not-actually-a-nut, the peanut!

Chef Satterfield is the executive chef and owner of Miller Union, an award-winning, seasonally-driven restaurant located in Atlanta's Westside neighborhood. Since opening in 2009, the restaurant has received various honors on many national lists including Eater, Bon Appetit, Food & Wine, Esquire and James Beard Foundation. In 2015, Satterfield released his first cookbook, Root to Leaf, to broad critical acclaim. Peanuts, his second book, is a delightful collection of recipes that offers ingenius ways to cook peanuts, from childhood snack, to kitchen condiment and even the centerpiece of a meal. Satterfield's dedication to seasonal cooking and his unwavering support for local farmers is the driving philosophy behind his restaurant and everything he does.

Peanuts belong to the legume family and are also known by the names of groundnut, goobers and monkey nut. The crop was domesticated thousands of years ago in South America, but now is sold across the globe in the forms of roasted or boiled nuts, oil, butter or even peanut flour. While they are a tasty treat to many, they are also implicated in food allergies for some, which can range from mild symptoms to life-threatening anaphylactic shock.

***

Have you ever wondered where your food comes from? Not just where it’s grown today, but where it originally popped up in the world? Have you ever bit into a delicious, red juicy ripe fruit and wondered, hey – why is it this color? What’s responsible for this amazing flavor? Or – is this good for my health? Could it even be medicinal?

Foodie Pharmacology is a food podcast built for the food curious, the flavor connoisseurs, chefs, science geeks, foodies and adventurous taste experimenters out in the world! So, join me on this adventure through history, medicine, cuisine and molecules as we explore the amazing pharmacology of our foods.

Dr. Cassandra Quave is an American ethnobotanist, herbarium curator, and assistant professor at Emory University. Her research focuses on analyzing wild plants used in traditional cultures for food and medicine to combat some of the greatest challenges we face today in medicine: antibiotic resistant infections and cancer.

Join Cassandra and Chef Steven Satterfield and they talk about even's favorite, not-actually-a-nut, the peanut!

Chef Satterfield is the executive chef and owner of Miller Union, an award-winning, seasonally-driven restaurant located in Atlanta's Westside neighborhood. Since opening in 2009, the restaurant has received various honors on many national lists including Eater, Bon Appetit, Food & Wine, Esquire and James Beard Foundation. In 2015, Satterfield released his first cookbook, Root to Leaf, to broad critical acclaim. Peanuts, his second book, is a delightful collection of recipes that offers ingenius ways to cook peanuts, from childhood snack, to kitchen condiment and even the centerpiece of a meal. Satterfield's dedication to seasonal cooking and his unwavering support for local farmers is the driving philosophy behind his restaurant and everything he does.

Peanuts belong to the legume family and are also known by the names of groundnut, goobers and monkey nut. The crop was domesticated thousands of years ago in South America, but now is sold across the globe in the forms of roasted or boiled nuts, oil, butter or even peanut flour. While they are a tasty treat to many, they are also implicated in food allergies for some, which can range from mild symptoms to life-threatening anaphylactic shock.

***

Have you ever wondered where your food comes from? Not just where it’s grown today, but where it originally popped up in the world? Have you ever bit into a delicious, red juicy ripe fruit and wondered, hey – why is it this color? What’s responsible for this amazing flavor? Or – is this good for my health? Could it even be medicinal?

Foodie Pharmacology is a food podcast built for the food curious, the flavor connoisseurs, chefs, science geeks, foodies and adventurous taste experimenters out in the world! So, join me on this adventure through history, medicine, cuisine and molecules as we explore the amazing pharmacology of our foods.

Dr. Cassandra Quave is an American ethnobotanist, herbarium curator, and assistant professor at Emory University. Her research focuses on analyzing wild plants used in traditional cultures for food and medicine to combat some of the greatest challenges we face today in medicine: antibiotic resistant infections and cancer.

42 min

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