28 min

Ep. 60 Incorporating Stress Management into Models of Women’s Healthcare for Beneficial Outcomes w/ Dr. Karen Sheffield-Abdullah Mama Needs A Moment

    • Parenting

Dr. Karen Sheffield-Abdullah is an Assistant Professor UNC Chapel Hill, a Certified Nurse-Midwife, Mindfulness Instructor, a wife, mother of four and a plant lover. She describes herself as a stress and anxiety researcher who is passionate about perinatal mental health and the impact on pregnancy outcomes specifically in black and brown women.

Dr. Karen is trying to get answers on why, despite decades of research, the black and brown communities have twice the rate of preterm birth and higher rates of death compared to white women. Using her depth of knowledge, experience and education, Dr. Karen is an advocate for birth equity, mental health awareness and mindfulness.

In our ongoing conversation, Dr. Karen begins by elaborating on the differences between culturally competent care and culturally humble care. She discusses the unique stressors to the black and brown communities, and talks about the importance of providing stress screeners with the understanding that they are meant to be a jumping off point to deeper conversations. Healthcare workers need to be comfortable with having the conversations. Dr. Karen describes it as, “getting comfortable with being uncomfortable.” Healthcare providers need to begin to normalize having deeper conversations with clients. We talk about the importance of midwives, the passing of a certain piece of legislation benefiting her research, and incorporating stress management into models of women’s health care for beneficial outcomes.


The importance of starting difficult conversations from a humble place. 


Normalizing mental health in black women during pregnancy. 


What is the Midwives for Moms Act?


Diversifying the nurse midwifery workforce is essential to improve outcomes. 


Why it’s important to bring more diversity into the health care system.


Stress and perinatal mood and anxiety disorders in black women.


How do we make it such that when we bring in examples of stress, when we talk about suffering, that it is through a culturally relevant lens?


Black women’s pain is notoriously under assessed and under-addressed.


The importance of self-reflecting when taking care of this community.


The ways her background in midwifery has shaped her view of the healthcare system and her professional goals.


Dr. Karen’s research results using self compassion, mindfulness and Mind Body therapies





Thank you to our sponsor:

HER Circle



Killing the Black Body, Medical Apartheid,

Understanding medical racism, look at Henrietta Lacks, J. Marion Sims, Tuskegee Airmen, eugenics

 Dr. David Treleaven, who has a book called trauma sensitive mindfulness


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Support this podcast: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/herhealthcollective/support

Dr. Karen Sheffield-Abdullah is an Assistant Professor UNC Chapel Hill, a Certified Nurse-Midwife, Mindfulness Instructor, a wife, mother of four and a plant lover. She describes herself as a stress and anxiety researcher who is passionate about perinatal mental health and the impact on pregnancy outcomes specifically in black and brown women.

Dr. Karen is trying to get answers on why, despite decades of research, the black and brown communities have twice the rate of preterm birth and higher rates of death compared to white women. Using her depth of knowledge, experience and education, Dr. Karen is an advocate for birth equity, mental health awareness and mindfulness.

In our ongoing conversation, Dr. Karen begins by elaborating on the differences between culturally competent care and culturally humble care. She discusses the unique stressors to the black and brown communities, and talks about the importance of providing stress screeners with the understanding that they are meant to be a jumping off point to deeper conversations. Healthcare workers need to be comfortable with having the conversations. Dr. Karen describes it as, “getting comfortable with being uncomfortable.” Healthcare providers need to begin to normalize having deeper conversations with clients. We talk about the importance of midwives, the passing of a certain piece of legislation benefiting her research, and incorporating stress management into models of women’s health care for beneficial outcomes.


The importance of starting difficult conversations from a humble place. 


Normalizing mental health in black women during pregnancy. 


What is the Midwives for Moms Act?


Diversifying the nurse midwifery workforce is essential to improve outcomes. 


Why it’s important to bring more diversity into the health care system.


Stress and perinatal mood and anxiety disorders in black women.


How do we make it such that when we bring in examples of stress, when we talk about suffering, that it is through a culturally relevant lens?


Black women’s pain is notoriously under assessed and under-addressed.


The importance of self-reflecting when taking care of this community.


The ways her background in midwifery has shaped her view of the healthcare system and her professional goals.


Dr. Karen’s research results using self compassion, mindfulness and Mind Body therapies





Thank you to our sponsor:

HER Circle



Killing the Black Body, Medical Apartheid,

Understanding medical racism, look at Henrietta Lacks, J. Marion Sims, Tuskegee Airmen, eugenics

 Dr. David Treleaven, who has a book called trauma sensitive mindfulness


---

Support this podcast: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/herhealthcollective/support

28 min