31 episodes

Epidemiology Counts from the Society for Epidemiologic Research, a podcast that gives you up to date information on the state of health research straight from researchers who are deeply involved with this work. In each episode, we’ll look at a particular disease or health condition or something that we are exposed to in our daily lives that may affect our health, and bring you a look at what we currently know and what don’t know about each of these conditions or potential causes of disease (what we refer to as “exposures”).

Epidemiology Counts from the Society for Epidemiologic Research Sue Bevan - Society for Epidemiologic Research (SER)

    • Science
    • 4.8 • 41 Ratings

Epidemiology Counts from the Society for Epidemiologic Research, a podcast that gives you up to date information on the state of health research straight from researchers who are deeply involved with this work. In each episode, we’ll look at a particular disease or health condition or something that we are exposed to in our daily lives that may affect our health, and bring you a look at what we currently know and what don’t know about each of these conditions or potential causes of disease (what we refer to as “exposures”).

    Epidemiology Counts – Episode 31 – Sports Injury

    Epidemiology Counts – Episode 31 – Sports Injury

    Sports is life. Fans have a deep devotion to their preferred teams from their alma maters or home towns. Fans spend shocking amounts of time discussing things like player stats and predictions of final game scores. The players are expected to be at the top of their game at all times. Regardless of the sport, players demand a lot from their bodies. The safety of players is paramount, and findings ways to minimize injury risk is key. Epidemiologists can be key players in helping identify ways to minimize risk of injury. Understanding what aspects of training are more relevant to injury risk, including specific activities and intensity, can help players avoid short term injuries. And in the long term, there are concerns for many players of lifetime consequences as a result of their sport, notably Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy in football and football, or Soccer as we call it in the USA). We talk with Drs. Christina Mack and Mackenzie Herzog of IQVIA about how epidemiologists can work with players and teams to minimize sports injury.

    • 53 min
    Epidemiology Counts – Episode 30 – The Built Environment: walking and biking

    Epidemiology Counts – Episode 30 – The Built Environment: walking and biking

    Our health is very much shaped by the structure of the spaces around us, what we often refer to as our built environment. The concept of the built environment was developed for fields of urban planning and architecture, and includes any aspects of our spaces that influence human activity, from density of homes and buildings, access to transportation options and community spaces, and the streets and sidewalks, or the lack thereof. The built environment is also highly relevant to public health. The structure of spaces around us will impact whether or not we elect to commute by automobile, public transit, or walking or riding a bicycle; it can impact selection of the foods we eat, proximity to health services, and, thereby, has greater impacts on equity, by driving housing prices and access to resources. Hosts Bryan James and Ghassan Hamra chat with Steve Mooney, assistant professor at University of Washington – Seattle about how our built environment shapes our transportation and pedestrian decisions.

    • 59 min
    Epidemiology Counts – Episode 29 – Residential Segregation & Redlining

    Epidemiology Counts – Episode 29 – Residential Segregation & Redlining

    Health in America is closely tied to where we live. Higher rates of preventable health conditions are concentrated in high-poverty neighborhoods that are more likely to be home to a higher proportion of Americans of color. Despite modern anti-discrimination laws that make people legally free to move wherever they like, the reality is that our cities and communities remain largely racially segregated. This segregation is not a result of chance, but rather the direct result of business practices and government housing policy that date back to almost a century ago. One notorious example is redlining, in which services such as home loans or insurance were denied to Black and Brown Americans by characterizing the communities that the lived in as “too risky”. In this episode of Epidemiology Counts, we discuss the legacy of racial segregation and practices such as redlining that have shaped our communities, and the lasting effect of segregation on health disparities in America. Host Bryan James and Ghassan Hamra, assistant professor in Epidemiology and Environmental Health and Engineering at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, talk to Dr. Sharrelle Barber a social epidemiologist at the Drexel University Dornsife School of Public Heath and leader of the new Ubuntu Center on Racism, Global Movements and Population Health Equity.

    • 1 hr 2 min
    Epidemiology Counts – Episode 28 – Breakthrough COVID-19 & Delta

    Epidemiology Counts – Episode 28 – Breakthrough COVID-19 & Delta

    The arrival of COVID-19 vaccines that are highly effective against infection and severe disease in late 2020 appeared to be the silver bullet that would end the pandemic and bring life back to the way it was in pre-pandemic times. But the emergence of the highly infectious Delta variant of the virus, coupled with large portions of the eligible public remaining unvaccinated, has dampened much of this initial hope and led to what is being called the Fourth Wave of the pandemic. The surge in infections and hospitalizations in this latest wave is primarily in the unvaccinated; however, many vaccinated persons are experiencing “breakthrough infections” in which the virus evades the protection afforded by the vaccine. How can we interpret what these breakthrough infections mean regarding the effectiveness of the vaccine and the need for continuation of masking and other behaviors? In this episode, we aim to provide tools to prepare you to interpret the many reports on breakthrough infections encountered on the news and other media. Host Bryan James talks to Justin Lessler, now a professor of epidemiology at the University of North Carolina Gillings School of Global Public Health, and Lucy D’Agostino McGowan, assistant professor of statistics at Wake Forest University, about breakthrough COVID-19 infections and the Delta variant. They also talk about unvaccinated kids returning to school amongst all of this and the potential for booster shots.

    • 1 hr 3 min
    Epidemiology Counts – Episode 27 – Perinatal Epidemiology

    Epidemiology Counts – Episode 27 – Perinatal Epidemiology

    What happens in pregnancy and the early stages of infancy can have a profound impact on child and adolescent development, and may even affect the health of individuals as adults. A growing understanding of which events may be most harmful for a growing fetus or newborn can lead to improvements in the health of babies, but it can also create quite a bit of fear and anxiety in expecting mothers and new parents. How do new parents sift through the many “dos and don’ts” that are thrown at them during pregnancy? What does the evidence base actually support? In previous podcast episodes, we discussed infertility (how to get pregnant) and maternal mortality (how to keep mothers safe during delivery); on this episode we focus on the health of the fetus and newborn baby. Bryan James and Hailey Banack chat with Robert Platt from McGill University about the latest in perinatal epidemiology, and why it is so hard to find answers to these questions using observational studies!

    • 58 min
    Epidemiology Counts – Episode 26 – Optimism

    Epidemiology Counts – Episode 26 – Optimism

    Can a positive outlook on life actually have a direct effect on our health? Optimism appears to be linked to better health and the ability to cope with and bounce back from disease and surgery, while pessimistic people are more likely to develop hypertension, heart disease and die prematurely than their optimistic peers. So what is behind these relationships? Can we really just will good health into existence by just thinking about it? Or are optimistic persons more likely to engage in healthy behaviors? Or could a skeptic (those pessimists!) argue that healthier people can just afford to be more optimistic, or that socioeconomic status or some other life condition allows certain people to be healthier and more optimistic? In this episode we dive deep into the link between optimism and health as host Bryan James chats with Eric Kim, assistant professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of British Columbia and Research Scholar at the Michael Smith Foundation for Health, and Bill Chopik , assistant professor in the Department of Psychology at Michigan State University.

    • 49 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
41 Ratings

41 Ratings

fotogail ,

Keep this going please

We need to hear experts in this field talking about this now as the US wakes up and hopefully learns fast. I’m over 60 in the SF Bay Area and unsure if I should give up on planned friend and family gatherings, (March theater tickets bought far in advance, charity events and my freelancer work life?) There is so little nuanced information so far, as of the first week of March. It helps to hear there’s real thought going on. (Review above written before shelter in place order and most news outlets shifting to all Covid 19 all the time! Now it’s June - still locked down as “vulnerable population” here.)Still want to learn more about now this virus is spreading and how it is managed around the world. Thanks.

hawt snauce ,

Racism as a public heath concern

Can you discuss any research focused on racism as a public heath concern? If you will not, why?

Errrrcabear ,

Thank you so much!

Thank you so much for the direct information! So helpful and timely!!

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