7 episodes

The broad aim of the Centre for Evidence Based Medicine is to develop, teach and promote evidence-based health care and provide support and resources to doctors and health care professionals to help maintain the highest standards of medicine.

Many of the talks are taken from the Oxford Evidence-Based Health Care Programme and delivered by members of the Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, the Centre of Evidence Medicine and leaders in the field of Evidence-based Health Care internationally.

Evidence-Based Health Care Oxford University

    • Education

The broad aim of the Centre for Evidence Based Medicine is to develop, teach and promote evidence-based health care and provide support and resources to doctors and health care professionals to help maintain the highest standards of medicine.

Many of the talks are taken from the Oxford Evidence-Based Health Care Programme and delivered by members of the Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, the Centre of Evidence Medicine and leaders in the field of Evidence-based Health Care internationally.

    • video
    How should we teach evidence-based medicine in the 21st century?

    How should we teach evidence-based medicine in the 21st century?

    Dr Gordon Guyatt provides a guest talk on how we should teach evidence-based medicine in the 21st century This free guest lecture is part of the Teaching Evidence-Based Practice module, part of the Oxford University Evidence-Based Health Care (EBHC) programme.

    About the speaker: Dr Gordon Guyatt is a Distinguished Professor in the Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University and one of the founders of Evidence-Based Medicine. He has played a key role in over 30 major clinical studies (including both large-scale observational and randomized trials) and has extensive expertise in study methodology. As co-founder and co-chair of the GRADE working group, he has been intimately involved in the development and evolution of the GRADE approach.

    Questions?
    Please contact the Evidence-Based Health Care (EBHC) team by emailing: cpdhealth@conted.ox.ac.uk

    To stay informed of programme news, including lectures and research news, sign up to the EBHC mailing list:
    https://conted.us6.list-manage.com/subscribe?u=b349338a9a&id=9769482733

    • 21 min
    • video
    The Role of Social Endometriosis Research in Improving Care and Addressing Intersectional Health Disparities

    The Role of Social Endometriosis Research in Improving Care and Addressing Intersectional Health Disparities

    Dr Annalise Weckesser will discuss her qualitative studies exploring women’s experiences of endometriosis and doctors’ perspectives on treating the condition and how to improve care. This episode explores what this research, and the growing body of social research on endometriosis more generally, contributes to efforts to improve care and address health disparities at the intersections of gender and race, and reflect on the ‘work to be done’ going forward in qualitative investigations of the condition. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 41 min
    • video
    How do species postpone or even escape from senescence?

    How do species postpone or even escape from senescence?

    Dr Rob Salguero-Gomez, Associate Professor in Ecology, Department of Zoology, gives a talk on lessons for a longer, better human life for the EBHC podcast series.

    • 55 min
    • video
    Evidence isn't enough: The politics and practicalities of communicating health research

    Evidence isn't enough: The politics and practicalities of communicating health research

    The logic and principles behind the drive for evidence-based health care are so compelling that often the limitations of evidence go unacknowledged. Despite a strong evidence base demonstrating the health risks associated with higher body weights, and health professionals routinely instructing patients to lose weight to improve their health, the incidence of obesity is predicted to continue to rise. Calling on his research into the relationships between obesity, inequality and health, Oli Williams - a fellow of The Healthcare Improvement Studies Institute - will argue that when it comes to reducing the burden on, and improving, health care a more critical approach to the way we generate, select, apply and communicate evidence is needed.

    Oli Williams completed his PhD in the Department of Sociology at the University of Leicester. He was subsequently awarded the NIHR CLAHRC West Dan Hill Fellowship in Health Equity which he held at the University of Bath. He later re-joined the University of Leicester in the Department of Health Sciences working in the SAPPHIRE Group and is now based at King's College London after being awarded a THIS Institute Postdoctoral Fellowship. His research focuses on health inequalities, the promotion of healthy lifestyles, obesity, weight stigma, equitable intervention and co-production. He co-founded the art collective Act With Love (AWL) to promote social change. The Weight of Expectation comic is one example of their work, view others at: www.actwithlove.co.uk In recognition of his work on weight stigma the British Science Association invited Oli to deliver the Margaret Mead Award Lecture for Social Sciences at the British Science Festival 2018.

    This talk was held as part of the Qualitative Research Methods course which is part of the Evidence-Based Health Care Programme. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 1 hr 2 min
    • video
    Systematic reviews: the past the present and the future

    Systematic reviews: the past the present and the future

    Making decisions and choices about health and social care need access to high-quality evidence from research. Systematic reviews provide this by both highlighting the quality of existing studies and by themselves providing a high-quality summary. Mike Clarke and Iain Chalmers [1], Iain Chalmers (James Lind Library and Fellow of CEBM), Carl Heneghan ( Professor of EBM and Director CEBM) and Kamal Mahtani (Associate Professor and Director of the MSc in Systematic Reviews) talk about the history and development of systematic reviews, their current delivery and the shortcomings in current review production and the future directions of systematic reviews, including the launch of CEBM's Evidence Synthesis Toolkit.

    This talk was held as part of the Practice of Evidence-Based Health Care course which is part of the Evidence-Based Health Care Programme.
    [1] Clarke M, Chalmers I Reflections on the history of systematic reviews. BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine 2018;23:121-122.

    • 51 min
    • video
    Value-based healthcare: Health economics re-packaged or re-packaging health economics?

    Value-based healthcare: Health economics re-packaged or re-packaging health economics?

    Sir Muir Gray and Lucy Abel debate: Is value-based health care nothing more than health economics re-packaged or is health economics nothing more than only one of the six contributors to value-based healthcare? Health economics is concerned with how to allocate resources in healthcare to optimise outcomes. Health economists have developed a variety of methods to evaluate whether the cost of providing healthcare interventions is worth the benefits. In other words, whether they are good value. These are based on preferences expressed by wider society relating to the value of increasing the length and quality of life. These values can be applied to an intervention by linking them via clinical outcomes.


    Sir Muir Gray is now working with both NHS England and Public Health England to bring about a transformation of care with the aim of increasing value for both populations and individuals and published a series of How To Handbooks for example, How to Get Better Value Healthcare, How To Build Healthcare Systems and How To Create the Right Healthcare Culture.


    Lucy Abel is a health economist working within the field of primary care and is part of the Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences at the University of Oxford. She collaborates with research groups to bring the tools of economic evaluation to primary care health science research.

    • 25 min

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