7 episodes

A podcast discussing the importance of feminist networks and solidarities in the current conjuncture.

Feminist Networks and the Conjuncture ICA Productions

    • Science

A podcast discussing the importance of feminist networks and solidarities in the current conjuncture.

    Dissecting Digital Futures and the Proliferation of Misogynoir

    Dissecting Digital Futures and the Proliferation of Misogynoir

    In this episode of Feminist Networks and the Conjuncture, Dr. Moya Bailey and Dr. Sarah Banet-Weiser discuss how Dr. Bailey coined the term “misogynoir”, her publications and digital work expanding upon the term as well as its real-life implications and possible solutions. Dr. Bailey further discusses her work in digital spaces and elaborates on her framework of social media as containing overlapping, generative, digital neighborhoods with the capacity to produce real-life social activists and transformational work.

    Click here for the episode transcript
     
    Featuring
    Sarah Banet-Weiser 
    Moya Bailey 

    Sponsor:
    Annenberg Center for Collaborative Communication

    More from our guests: 
     
    Sarah Banet-Weiser
    Distinguished Professor  | Annenberg School for Communication
    University of Pennsylvania
    Professor | Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism 
    University of Southern California
    Director | Center for Collaborative Communication at the Annenberg Schools
    Twitter - @sbanetweiser

    Moya Bailey
    Associate Professor | Department of Communication Studies
    Northwestern University
    Digital Alchemist, Octavia E. Butler Legacy Network
    Board President, Allied Media Projects
    Twitter: @moyazb
    IG: @transformisogynoir

    Works Referenced in Episode: 
    Jackson, S. J., Bailey, M., & Welles, B. F. (2020). # HashtagActivism: Networks of race and gender justice. MIT Press.
    Bailey, M. (2021). Misogynoir Transformed: Black Women’s Digital Resistance. New York: NYU Press.
    Perry, I. (2018). Vexy Thing. In Vexy Thing. Duke University Press.
    Duffy T. P. (2011). The Flexner Report--100 years later. The Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine, 84(3), 269–276.
    Collective, C. F. (2011). Crunk Feminist Collective.
    Copy and Audio Editor:  
    Jo Lampert 
    Sharlene Burgos 

    Executive Producer: 
    DeVante Brown 

    • 21 min
    Reality TV: A Constant Reinvention for Living in Real-Time?

    Reality TV: A Constant Reinvention for Living in Real-Time?

    In this episode, host Sarah Banet-Weiser talks with Professor Eva Hageman and Professor Laurie Ouellette about their work on representation in reality TV and on identity in social media, respectively. They discuss how contemporary media impose a script for living but also offer a platform for social change. They problematize the social impact of reality TV by pointing out how some TV shows offer medical and financial resources to families who have been neglected by state institutions, but they also point out how this requires families to play the role of marginalized people.
     
    Click here for the episode transcript.
     
    Featuring
    Sarah Banet-Weiser
    Eva Hageman
    Laurie Ouellette
     
    Sponsor:
    Annenberg Center for Collaborative Communication

    More from the host & speakers: 

    Sarah Banet-Weiser
    Distinguished Professor; Professor | Annenberg School for Communication; Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism 
    University of Pennsylvania; University of Southern California
    Twitter - @sbanetweiser
     
    Eva Hageman
    Assistant Professor in the Department of American Studies and the Harriet Tubman Department of Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
    University of Maryland

    Laurie Ouellette
    Professor of Communication Studies and Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature, Department Chair
    University of Minnesota
    Twitter: @ProfOuellette
    Facebook: Laurie Ouellette
    Instagram: @lauriejean2016
    Works referenced in episode: 
    Ouellette, L. (2017). Bare enterprise: US television and the business of dispossession (post-crisis, gender and property television). European Journal of Cultural Studies, 20(5), 490-508.

    Ouellette, L. (2019). Spark joy? Compulsory happiness and the feminist politics of decluttering. Culture Unbound, 11(3-4), 534-550.
    Ouellette, L., & Hay, J. (2008). Better Living Through Reality Tv: Television and post-welfare citizenship. Blackwell Pub. 
    Hageman, E. C. (2019). Debt by Design: Race and Home Valorization on Reality TV. In Mukherjee, R., Banet-Weiser, S., & Gray, H. (Eds.). Racism postrace. Durham, NC: Duke University Press.

    Copy and Audio Editors:
    Jo Lampert
    Dominic Bonelli
    Executive Producer:DeVante Brown

    • 20 min
    The Feminist Ethics of Care: Community Building in Academia

    The Feminist Ethics of Care: Community Building in Academia

    In this episode, host Sarah Banet-Weiser talks with guest Sarah J. Jackson about the feminist ethics care work in academia. They discuss how the responsibility of care work falls most heavily on women and people of color, especially when supporting students of the same marginalized identities. They also talk about balancing care work in personal lifes, and how institutions could adopt feminist ethics to create a more forgiving environment for caregivers. 
     
    Click here for the episode transcript
     
    Featuring
    Sarah Banet-Weiser
    Sarah J. Jackson
     
    Sponsor:
    Annenberg Center for Collaborative Communication

    More from the host & speakers: 

    Sarah Banet-Weiser
    Distinguished Professor; Professor | Annenberg School for Communication; Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism 
    University of Pennsylvania; University of Southern California
    Twitter - @sbanetweiser
     
    Sarah J. Jackson
    Presidential Associate Professor; Co-Director | Annenberg School for Communication; Media, Inequality & Change Center
    University of Pennsylvania
    Twitter - @sjjphd

    Works referenced in episode: 
    Jackson, S. J. (2014). Black celebrity, racial politics, and the press: Framing dissent (p. 218). Taylor & Francis.
    Jackson, S. J., Bailey, M., & Welles, B. F. (2020). # HashtagActivism: Networks of race and gender justice. Mit Press.

    Copy and Audio Editors:
    Lucia Barnum
    Jo Lampert

    • 19 min
    Women and Whisper Networks: Anti-GBV Activism on College Campuses and Online

    Women and Whisper Networks: Anti-GBV Activism on College Campuses and Online

    In this episode, host Sarah Banet-Weiser talks with McGill researchers Carrie Rentschler and Emily Colpitts about how attitudes against gender-based violence (GBV) are changing. They examine how colleges respond to sexual violence on campus, and how student activism plays into university policy. They also discuss the intersection of social media in preventing GBV — and whether such technology can truly disrupt systems of sexual violence. 
     
    Click here for the episode transcript
     
    Featuring
    Sarah Banet-Weiser
    Carrie Rentschler
    Emily Colpitts
     
    Sponsor:
    Annenberg Center for Collaborative Communication

    More from the host & speakers: 

    Sarah Banet-Weiser
    Distinguished Professor; Professor | Annenberg School for Communication; Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism 
    University of Pennsylvania; University of Southern California
    Twitter - @sbanetweiser
     
    Carrie Rentschler
    Associate Professor | Department of Art History & Communication Studies
    McGill University 
    Twitter - @RentschlerC

    Emily Colpitts
    SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow | Department of Art History & Communication Studies
    McGill University 
    Twitter - @emcolpitts

    Works referenced in episode: 
    Mitchell, C., & Rentschler, C. (2016). Girlhood and the Politics of Place (p. 354). Berghahn Books.
    Rentschler, C. A. (2011). Second wounds: Victims’ rights and the media in the US. Duke University Press.

    Copy and Audio Editors:
    Lucia Barnum
    Kate In

    • 19 min
    Trailer: The International Communication Association Podcast Network

    Trailer: The International Communication Association Podcast Network

    The International Communication Association presents the ICA Podcast Network, where we’re grappling with questions about how to navigate, transform, and make sense of a changing world.

    • 8 min
    From the Ducking Stool to Digital Culture: Silence and Women’s Voices

    From the Ducking Stool to Digital Culture: Silence and Women’s Voices

    In this episode, host Sarah Banet-Weiser talks with guests Francesca Sobande and Jilly Kay about their recent research, including how Black women in Britain are creating their own digital spaces. They discuss the history of how women’s voices have been silenced in public spaces, from the ducking stool to the NDA, and the nuances of when silence becomes an active form of presence. They also discuss femvertising and the role of capitalism in feminist media — focusing throughout on the importance of parsing the contradictions of feminist scholarship.
     
    Click here for the episode transcript
     
    Featuring
    Sarah Banet-Weiser
    Francesca Sobande
    Jilly Kay
     
    Sponsors
    Annenberg Center for Collaborative Communication

    More from the host & speakers: 

    Sarah Banet-Weiser
    Distinguished Professor; Professor | Annenberg School for Communication; Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism 
    University of Pennsylvania; University of Southern California
    Twitter - @sbanetweiser
     
    Francesca Sobande 
    Lecturer | School of Journalism, Media, and Culture
    Cardiff University
    Twitter - @chess_ess @CardiffJomec @cardiffuni
     
    Jilly Kay
    Lecturer | Department of Media and Communication
    University of Leicester
    Twitter - @jillybkay @deptmedialeic

    Works referenced in episode: 
    Kay, J. B. (2020). Gender, media and voice: Communicative injustice and public speech. Springer Nature.
    Sobande, F., & Sobande, F. (2020). Why the Digital Lives of Black Women in Britain? (pp. 1-27). Springer International Publishing.
    Emejulu, A., & Sobande, F. (2019). To exist is to resist: Black feminism in Europe. Pluto Press.
    Sobande, F. (2022). Black oot here: black lives in Scotland. Bloomsbury Publishing.

    • 25 min

Top Podcasts In Science

Hidden Brain
Hidden Brain, Shankar Vedantam
Something You Should Know
Mike Carruthers | OmniCast Media | Cumulus Podcast Network
Radiolab
WNYC Studios
Reinvent Yourself with Dr. Tara
Dr. Tara Swart Bieber
Ologies with Alie Ward
Alie Ward
StarTalk Radio
Neil deGrasse Tyson