13 episodes

The Fields of the Future podcast amplifies the voices and highlights the work of scholars, artists, and writers who are injecting new narratives into object centered-thinking. Join us for engaging conversations between BGC faculty and fellows and their guests.

Fields of the Future Bard Graduate Center

    • Education
    • 5.0 • 2 Ratings

The Fields of the Future podcast amplifies the voices and highlights the work of scholars, artists, and writers who are injecting new narratives into object centered-thinking. Join us for engaging conversations between BGC faculty and fellows and their guests.

    S3E4: there’s nothing new about lace

    S3E4: there’s nothing new about lace

    In the final episode of the season, join our host and an artist-educator as we talk about the broader Yorùbá textile canon — which has existed dynamically for centuries, and made it possible for lace to come on the scene. We move through enduring adages about dress & appearance, marvel at the labor-intensive openwork of handwoven aṣọ òkè, dive into the intricate patterns of àdìrẹ, and consider how textile artists are responding to lace till today.

    • 42 min
    S3E1: what makes a good lace?, pt 1

    S3E1: what makes a good lace?, pt 1

    An interactive micro-exhibition and podcast where we talk about laces—originally Austrian-made, but now produced globally—in Nigerian culture.

    In our season opener, two and a half generations of a Nigerian diasporic family sit around the table to talk about some of our favorite laces. We bounce from “classics,” like Swiss voile and French lace, to the latest trends, like sequins and beading on netting, or tulle. Come sit with us as we reflect on how tastes have changed, gist about our likes (and dislikes), and wonder where things might be headed.

    • 29 min
    S3E2: lace, remade in our image

    S3E2: lace, remade in our image

    An interactive micro-exhibition and podcast where we talk about laces—originally Austrian-made, but now produced globally—in Nigerian culture.

    Think of the fabrics around you growing up—is there a familiar stack of textiles, patterns, or garments? How did they get there? In this episode, we talk about how laces made in Austria landed thousands of miles away in the wardrobes of Nigerians, and the things that happened along the way as Nigerians remade these laces in their own image. It’s a story of evolving tastes, enduring culture, trade policies, industry crises, and more.

    • 32 min
    S3E3: aṣọ ẹbí, the family cloth

    S3E3: aṣọ ẹbí, the family cloth

    An interactive micro-exhibition and podcast where we talk about laces—originally Austrian-made, but now produced globally—in Nigerian culture.

    As soon one hears that Baba so-and-so is celebrating his 70th, the next question might be, “Is there aṣọ ẹbí for the event?” In this episode, we talk about aṣọ ẹbí, our community practice that fuels the buying, selling, and wearing of textiles for celebrations in Nigerian communities.

    • 34 min
    S1E9: Brandon R. Byrd—Redefining Intellectual History

    S1E9: Brandon R. Byrd—Redefining Intellectual History

    In This Episode
    Peter N. Miller speaks to Brandon R. Byrd, historian of Black intellectual and social history, about the scope of intellectual history, the “rise” of Black intellectual history, and the urgent necessity to incorporate stories and knowledges that have been left out of the field. Through lively and deliberate intellectual exchange, Byrd and Miller explore a discipline in flux.

    • 34 min
    S1E8: Tanya Aguiñiga—Making Metabolizing the Border

    S1E8: Tanya Aguiñiga—Making Metabolizing the Border

    In This Episode
    Christina De León speaks to Tanya Aguiñiga about Metabolizing the Border, the performative embodiment of her engagement with the people and the landscape at the borderlands between Mexico and the US. With frank candor, Aguiñiga describes her years on the road and the environment, politics, and trauma that animate her work, as well as the emotional and spiritual difficulty of the performance and its aftermath.

    • 34 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
2 Ratings

2 Ratings

Top Podcasts In Education

Mel Robbins
Dr. Jordan B. Peterson
Jordan Harbinger
Ashley Corbo
Duolingo
Incongruity