17 episodes

On each episode of 'Frans Hals Paintings–The Podcast', American-Dutch art historian and Hals scholar John Bezold investigates and discusses the oeuvre of this celebrated artist from the Dutch Golden Age. Eternally overshadowed by his more famous painting peers, Rembrandt and Vermeer; this podcast seeks to discover–and share–why Frans Hals' paintings, and their brushwork, have captivated viewers for centuries.

Frans Hals Paintings—The Podcast John Bezold

    • Arts
    • 5.0 • 1 Rating

On each episode of 'Frans Hals Paintings–The Podcast', American-Dutch art historian and Hals scholar John Bezold investigates and discusses the oeuvre of this celebrated artist from the Dutch Golden Age. Eternally overshadowed by his more famous painting peers, Rembrandt and Vermeer; this podcast seeks to discover–and share–why Frans Hals' paintings, and their brushwork, have captivated viewers for centuries.

    Tieleman Roosterman

    Tieleman Roosterman

    In the 16th episode of 'Frans Hals Paintings—The Podcast’, I discuss Frans Hals' portrait of Tieleman Roosterman, which since 1999, has been part of the collection of the Cleveland Museum of Art, in Ohio, in the USA. The painting has long been attributed to Hals by scholars, since the late-1800s. Seymour Slive numbered the work number 93, in his 1974 catalogue; Claus Grimm numbered it 76, in his 1989 catalogue. It is the pendant to Hals’ portrait of Catherina Brugman, numbered 94 in the same catalogue. This is a portrait of a very self-assured man. Standing at a three-fourth portrayal at nearly life-size; the canvas shows Tieleman positioned against a tan, neutral background, with a confident, jaunty posture. Dressed in a black doublet adorned with intricate black embroidery along the seams and along his cuffs; his eyes gaze directly at the viewer, creating an intense connection between observer and sitter. The composition reflects Hals’ skill in capturing the personality and vitality of his sitter, through dynamic brushwork and keen observation of details.

    Learn more about the work at the Cleveland Museum of Art.

    You can find John on X ⁠⁠@johnbezold⁠⁠ and at his website ⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠johnbezold.com⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠.

    'Frans Hals Paintings—The Podcast' is published by ⁠⁠Semicolon-Press.

    • 14 min
    The Laughing Cavalier

    The Laughing Cavalier

    In the 15th episode of 'Frans Hals Paintings—The Podcast’, I discuss Frans Hals' 1624 portrait The Laughing Cavalier, which is in the collection of the Wallace Collection in London. Seymour Slive numbered the work number 30, in his 1974 catalogue, and Claus Grimm accepted it as number 18, in his catalogue of 1989. Wilhelm von Bode, Cornelis Hofstede de Groot, and William Valentiner all accepted it, too. The work was not included in any of the twentieth century's Hals exhibitions of 1937, 1962, or 1989-1990. The portrait depicts a young man with a robust and confident demeanor—shown from the waist up, seated against a plain, dark background that accentuates his brightly lit figure. He wears an elaborately embellished doublet, whose embroidery is rendered in detail. This painting is heavily engrained in British cultural and has been, since it was won at auction, in 1865, by Richard Seymour-Conway, 4th Marquess of Hertford.

    Read a review of Frans Hals: The Male Portrait by Lelia Packer and Ashok Roy, published by Early Modern Low Countries in 2022.

    Learn more about the painting at the Wallace Collection.

    You can find John on X ⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠@johnbezold⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠ and at his website ⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠johnbezold.com⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠.

    'Frans Hals Paintings—The Podcast' is published by ⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠Semicolon-Press.

    • 9 min
    Claes Duyst van Voorhout

    Claes Duyst van Voorhout

    In the 14th episode of 'Frans Hals Paintings—The Podcast’, I discuss Frans Hals' c. 1630s portrait of Claes Duyst van Voorhout, which is in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum in Manhattan. Seymour Slive numbered the work number 119, in his 1974 catalogue, and Claus Grimm accepted it as number 81, in his 1989. It was accepted by Wilhelm von Bode, Cornelis Hofstede de Groot, and William Valentiner. It was included in the solo Hals exhibitions of the twentieth century of 1937 and 1989-1990, though only in Washington for the latter. Claes Duyst van Voorhout is depicted in a three-quarter view, standing against a plain, dark background that highlights his figure and attire. He is dressed in a dark, elaborately designed doublet, richly textured, and adorned with intricate gold embroidery. The details of the garment, including the ornate buttons and the subtle play of light on the fabric, showcase Hals's mastery in rendering different materials with striking realism.

    Learn more about fashion in seventeenth-century European paintings, see Emilie E.S. Gordenker's 2002 dissertation in book form published by Brepols, Van Dyck and the Representation of Dress in Seventeenth-Century Portraiture.

    Read a review of the book, by Julia Marciari Alexander in the Burlington Magazine, from 2004.

    You can find John on X ⁠⁠⁠⁠@johnbezold⁠⁠⁠⁠ and at his website ⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠johnbezold.com⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠.

    'Frans Hals Paintings—The Podcast' is published by ⁠⁠⁠⁠Semicolon-Press.

    • 9 min
    The Fisher Boy

    The Fisher Boy

    In the 13th episode of 'Frans Hals Paintings—The Podcast’, I discuss Frans Hals' c. early-1630s work The Fisher Boy, which is in the collection of the Royal Museum of Fine Arts Antwerp. Seymour Slive numbered the work number 71, in his 1974 catalogue. It was accepted by Wilhelm von Bode, Cornelis Hofstede de Groot, William Valentiner, though not Claus Grimm. It was included in the solo Hals exhibitions of the twentieth century of 1937 and 1962, yet only in Washington and not Haarlem and London, for the 1989-1990 exhibition. This painting is a quintessential example of Hals’ skill in capturing the essence of his subjects with both realism and expressive brushwork, with the ever-so-famous ‘virtuosity’ of Hals present, throughout the foreground of the canvas in the clothing of the boy.

    You can find John on X ⁠⁠⁠⁠@johnbezold⁠⁠⁠⁠ and at his website ⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠johnbezold.com⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠.

    'Frans Hals Paintings—The Podcast' is published by ⁠⁠⁠⁠Semicolon-Press.

    • 9 min
    Cunera van Baersdorp

    Cunera van Baersdorp

    In the 12th episode of 'Frans Hals Paintings—The Podcast’, I discuss Frans Hals' portrait of Cunera van Baersdorp, which is in a private collection. The painting has long been attributed to Hals by scholars, nearly universally. Seymour Slive numbered the work number 120, in his 1974 catalogue, and it was identified only in 2012 as the pendant to Michiel de Wael; numbered 85 in the same catalogue. It was not included in any of solo Hals exhibitions of the twentieth century; 1937, 1962, or 1989-1990. It is a masterful work that encapsulates the elegance and sophistication of Frans Hals' portraiture, making it a valuable piece for both art historians and connoisseurs of Old Master paintings.

    View the new catalogue of Susan and Matthew Weatherbie's collection, written by Peter Sutton and published by the Museum of Fine Arts Boston.

    View Ann Jensen Adams' 2009 book Public Faces and Private Identities in Seventeenth-Century Holland, published by Cambridge University Press; read a 2016 review of the book.

    You can find John on X ⁠⁠⁠@johnbezold⁠⁠⁠ and at his website ⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠johnbezold.com⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠.

    'Frans Hals Paintings—The Podcast' is published by ⁠⁠⁠Semicolon-Press.

    • 12 min
    Catherina Brugman

    Catherina Brugman

    In the 11th episode of 'Frans Hals Paintings—The Podcast’, I discuss Frans Hals' portrait of Catherina Burgman, which is in a private collection. The painting has long been attributed to Hals by scholars, since the late-1800s. Seymour Slive numbered the work number 94, in his 1974 catalogue. It is the pendant to Hals’ portrait of Tieleman Roosterman, numbered 93 in the same catalogue. Hardly ever on public view; it was last exhibited in the 1920s, in London. The painting exemplifies Hals' mastery in capturing the textures of fabrics and the subtleties of facial expressions, as well as his ability to convey the status and personality of his sitters, through detailed and realistic portraiture.

    Learn more about pearls in seventeenth-century Dutch paintings in Eddy de Jongh's 1975-1976 article 'Pearls of Virtue and Pearls of Vice', originally published in Simiolus.

    Learn about the history of the 'why not both' meme.

    You can find John on X ⁠⁠@johnbezold⁠⁠ and at his website ⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠johnbezold.com⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠.

    'Frans Hals Paintings—The Podcast' is published by ⁠⁠Semicolon-Press.

    • 14 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
1 Rating

1 Rating

Top Podcasts In Arts

Fresh Air
NPR
The Moth
The Moth
99% Invisible
Roman Mars
The Jimmy Dore Show
Jimmy Dore
The Magnus Archives
Rusty Quill
The Pink House with Sam Smith
Lemonada Media