162 episodes

A podcast that interviews musicians and provides in-depth, and at times zany, reviews regarding the latest albums from the obscurer corners of extreme metal, dark ambient, and noise.

From Corners Unknown From Corners Unknown

    • Music Commentary
    • 4.9, 11 Ratings

A podcast that interviews musicians and provides in-depth, and at times zany, reviews regarding the latest albums from the obscurer corners of extreme metal, dark ambient, and noise.

    #163 | Album Review | Mamaleek – Come and See

    #163 | Album Review | Mamaleek – Come and See

    Download this episode by clicking the arrow button to the right of this player: DownloadLast week, we prattled about the mysterious avant-garde extreme metal project, Serpent Column. This week, we are coincidentally chatting about another, however, this troupe revels in an experimental domain wholly distinctive from Serpent Column’s terse and bludgeoning mathcore spliced frenetic black metal. Enter Mamaleek. Mamaleek is a mystifying avant-garde duo helmed by two anonymous brothers from the San Francisco area. They formed sometime in 2008 and have released seven LPs to date. Admittedly, Connor and I are quite green behind the ears with respect to Mamaleek’s amorphous and ever-mutating sound, especially in regards to how they have evolved since their conception and how their latest effort Come and See stands in relation to their back-catalog. Thus, we have roped in an infrequently recurring guest for this episode, Adam, owner/operator of Constant Disappointment Records.Come and See is an album that seeks “to analyze the emotional impact of the spaces we occupy, the surreal forces behind the appearance of physical reality, and the residues they leave behind.” (source). The album’s cover is that of Chicago’s Cabrini-Green public housing project, which was constructed piecemeal over two decades (1942 to 1962), and at its peak, it housed about 15,000 individuals. Through this lens, Mamaleek explores and emits timbres that ceaselessly flood city streets with deafening clamor. Discordant saxophone notes blare like throngs of sirens ricocheting off of concrete and asphalt architecture. Aberrations of desperate shrieks promulgate the erosion of sanity. It’s anxiety-inducing and stifling, yet Come and See manages to simultaneously embed sparks of astounding bliss between their bouts of despondent, smog-laden murk. Be it grooving bass lines, the cathartic blast-beat outpour on “Eating Unblessed Meat”, the shoegazey euphoria percolating within “Cabrini-Green”, or its sundry of surfy flashpoints, Mamaleek continue to shirk categorization. Much more can be divulged here, but so as to not detract from the history lesson and context Adam provides us, we’ll leave it at that. Thank you so much for tuning in!





































































    * * * * * *You can grab a digital or physical (red LP) of Come and See via Mamaleek’s Bandcamp page. Though the band does not operate their own social media, infrequent posts are made on their The Flenser-managed Facebook page. Follow them there, or The Flenser’s own Facebook/Instagram pages to stay up-to-date on new developments from the elusive duo.If you’d like to support us beyond listening to our podcast, you can do so by becoming a patron on our Patreon page.

    • 1 hr 37 min
    #162 | Album Review | Serpent Column – Endless Detainment

    #162 | Album Review | Serpent Column – Endless Detainment

    Download this episode by clicking the arrow button to the right of this player: DownloadSerpent Column is an inscrutable avant-garde black metal troupe based somewhere in the United States. Though I did stumble upon a note postulating that they’re located in Michigan, I was unable to independently verify this, hence my generic geographical marker of “somewhere.” Details on this project are scant. The date of formation is not explicitly known. Their lyrics are not published to our knowledge. However, we do know that Theoponos is the sole brainchild and lifeblood of Serpent Column. Their real name eludes us, but this insight is moot in digesting and making sense of the caustic grime festering within their debilitating aural constructs.Not even seven months after their 2019 sophomore LP Mirror in Darkness did Serpent Column unfurl their deafening sequent, Endless Detainment, a 22-minute mini-LP (MLP). Where Mirror in Darkness harbored an engulfing atmosphere laden in dreariness and perpetually shifting vistas of cataclysmic grandeur, Endless Detainment boils these elements down to their utmost jagged essence. Not a single iota of fat drips from its carrion-picked bones. Compositions are terse and trenchant. Pandemonium ceaselessly wavers via mathcore angularity, oft clobbering us in a tempest of excoriating howls and scalding discordance. This intoxicating vigor permeates the vast breadth of Endless Detainment‘s runtime, however, sporadic respites corrugate its roughshod barbarity. These come in the form of thrashy or rocking aberrations, and while admittedly surprising on first encounter, they render the blasphemous excursion most enthralling. We sincerely hope you enjoy our exchange over this MLP as Connor found it to be a gem as did I. Thank you so much for tuning in!





































































    * * * * * *You can obtain a digital copy of Endless Detainment via Serpent Column’s Bandcamp page. The physical release is a single-sided black vinyl of which only eight copies remain at the time of this episode’s publication. Serpent Column does not have a social media presence, but if you’d like to stay in the loop about new developments from their camp, you can follow the Mystískaos Facebook page.If you’d like to support us beyond listening to our podcast, you can do so by becoming a patron on our Patreon page. There you can read all of our notes for each album review episode we publish, gain early access to every episode before its official release, and acquire an embroidered From Corners Unknown patch, button, and stickers if that’s your thing. Up next album is our review of Mamaleek’s seventh LP, Come and See. Thank you to Duncan Park for supporting us here.

    • 1 hr 11 min
    #161 | Album Reviews | Beneath the Massacre, Benighted, Black Curse, and DVT

    #161 | Album Reviews | Beneath the Massacre, Benighted, Black Curse, and DVT

    Download this episode by clicking the arrow button to the right of this player: DownloadIt’s been much too long since our last “Album Reviews” episode here at the FCU bayou. Allow me to jumpstart your memory regarding this series as even I am a bit misty on the details. Tim and I select four recent albums that are festering in the veins of extreme metal. We endeavor to summarize our thoughts for each and then we proceed to chat about them in an order usually determined toward the beginning of an episode. In this one, we went alphabetically as three of the four bands begin with the letter ‘b’. Relative to the weekly album review podcast episodes between Connor and myself, this series is quite relaxed in that we don’t delve into the bedrock of each track comprising a record. Rather, we speak more generally about the qualities we liked/disliked, and I often ask Tim (aka Humbaba) to opine from his own music production/composition perspective. That’s the gist.With all of that exposition out of the way, we are elated to return to the fray with tones barbaric, ritualistic, blistering, and ravenous. In this episode, we prattle about the return of tech-death titans Beneath the Massacre and their fourth LP, Fearmonger. Then we proceed to the latest conceptual offering from France’s renowned brutal deathgrind quintet, Benighted, and their latest effort, Obscene Repressed. Endless Wound, the excoriating black death debut from extreme metal supergroup Black Curse follows next and the episode concludes with the amorphous and ever-mysterious black ambient doom duo, Death Void Terror (DVT).Below you will find a few extra details regarding each album discussed in this episode. Timestamps are provided for the approximate mark we begin chatting about a record in case you’d like to skip around. Additionally, social media links and links to each band’s respective labels are provided in case you want to acquire a digital/physical copy. Thank you so much for tuning in; we sincerely hope you enjoy our exchange.

































    1. Beneath the Massacre – Fearmonger (03:42)























































    Label: Century MediaFrom: Montréal, Quebec













    Facebook-f





    Instagram





    Spotify

    • 1 hr 50 min
    #160 | Album Review | Old Man Gloom – Seminar IX: Darkness of Being

    #160 | Album Review | Old Man Gloom – Seminar IX: Darkness of Being

    Download this episode by clicking the arrow button to the right of this player: DownloadGreetings Gloompa Loompas! Back toward the end of March 2020, which feels like eons ago, the experimental ambient sludge quintet Old Man Gloom (OMG) pulled a “reverse gloom” on us. Instead of dropping their two new LPs on the official release date of May 22nd via Profound Lore, they instead published their second album, Seminar IX: Darkness of Being, well in advance of the first, Seminar VIII: Light of Meaning, as a gift to the world. This tactic is rather uncharacteristic of the ape troupe, especially when compared to the antics (i.e., “gloom”) leading up to the dawn of their Ape of God era in 2014. At that time, they dropped the eponymous record to reviewers and news outlets alike, however, they soon divulged that it was a fake and that Ape of God is actually two LPs. For brevity, I’ll skirt the plethora of details, the chagrin of music journalists who reviewed the counterfeit album, and note that Ape of God were formative records for both Connor and myself. Not only did OMG’s antics give us something snicker at, but it also expanded our respective extreme metal horizons and simultaneously entrenched between us a riverbed through which our friendship would deepen and flourish.Seminar IX: Darkness of Being is a heartfelt tribute to Caleb Scofield (bassist for Cave In, Zozobra, and OMG), who tragically passed away in March of 2018. Most, if not all compositions, comprising this record harbor his memory. Be it through lyrics, unfinished tracks and/or bass lines Caleb crafted years ago, or the poignant effusion of grief, the healing process endured by each OMG member radiates throughout this seminar to commit his life to the timelessness of recorded sound. Admittedly, Connor and I are not so familiar with OMG’s pre-Ape of God work (exceptions being NO and Christmas), though relative to the Ape of God era, Darkness of Being expands the troupe’s tonal palette. “Death Rhymes” emanates a cozy living room feel as a droning, dirgeful organ accompanies a loving acoustic guitar melody. Contemplative ambient swells lull as if an endless gaze upon a serene expanse will dredge understanding. Yet still, we are treated to the off-kilter experimentation commonplace to OMG and other Aaron Turner adjacent projects: out of tune strings, mangled percussive notes, insidious gurgles of noise; it’s all there. Much more could be said here, but so as to not subtract from the conversation, I will refrain. We sincerely hope you enjoy our review as well as the little stories we share as it relates to OMG and their importance to us; thank you so much for tuning in.





































































    * * * * * *You can acquire a digital copy of Seminar IX: Darkness of Being via the Profound Lore Bandcamp page. There, you can also grab a CD. If you’re a wax fiend, vinyl is available on Profound Lore’s a href="ht...

    • 1 hr 27 min
    #159 | Track Reviews | Knock Over City, ZOMBIESHARK!, Firelink, Bell Witch & Aerial Ruin, Gaytheist & Intercourse, and Defeated Sanity

    #159 | Track Reviews | Knock Over City, ZOMBIESHARK!, Firelink, Bell Witch & Aerial Ruin, Gaytheist & Intercourse, and Defeated Sanity

    Download this episode by clicking the arrow button to the right of this player: DownloadHello! Welcome to the pilot episode of a new podcast series we’re testing out here at the rickety FCU dwelling titled “Track Reviews”. The goal is to provide you some quick insights into fresh(er) tracks, EPs, and/or splits that have recently made their way onto the web. In traditional fashion, we plucked a smattering of disparate tones and vibes to keep the conversation tilted and dynamic. Heavy indie, funeral doom, cybergrind, and slamming death metal are but a few genres discussed. And to make matters a bit more topsy turvy, we enlisted the third voice of review writer Derek Paul, not only to intermittently derail the conversation into Dark Souls diatribes but to add some undiluted frankness to the mix. Below you will find the list of tracks, EPs, and splits we discuss during this episode in order of appearance. Bandcamp embedded players, social media links, and a handful of other cursory details are provided too. As this episode is a pilot, we do not have a publication frequency ironed out quite yet; however, our current thought is to produce these about once per month. If there are some new tracks you’d like to hear us dissect, please don’t hesitate to ping us either by email or on our social media channels. We sincerely hope you enjoy this new series and we’d love to hear any feedback (positive, negative, indifferent) you may have about it. Thank you for tuning in.

































    1. Knock Over City – it's rad, dude.











































    Label: Constant Disappointment RecordsGenre: Alternative / PunkFrom: Lowell, MA













    Facebook-f





    Instagram





    Spotify







































    2. ZOMBIESHARK! – "Computer Kidz Unite"











































    Label: Self-releasedGenre: CybergrindFrom: Philadelphia, PA

    • 1 hr 10 min
    #158 | Album Review | Return to Worm Mountain – Therianthropy

    #158 | Album Review | Return to Worm Mountain – Therianthropy

    Download this episode by clicking the arrow button to the right of this player: DownloadBack in February of 2019, Connor and I had a relatively brief chat about Return to Worm Mountain’s debut self-titled LP. It transpired during the final episode of our now defunct Voices From Corners Unknown series, which was structured as us having three snappy discussions of, you guessed it, three albums. However, immediately after that episode’s release, we switched gears to focus on one album per episode because we found the Voices structure too limiting to provide in-depth insight into albums we could likely spend an hour plus rambling about. And though I cannot say Return to Worm Mountain’s debut was the sole reason we shifted speeds (our sanity and composure were slowly decaying under the weight of the swift reviews), it certainly played a key role as it was one Connor and I loved (and still love) dearly but we didn’t have enough time to expound upon it. Fortunately, the South African duo has returned to the fray with their sophomore effort Therianthropy, which now grants us the ripe opportunity to pour over their outlandish cross-pollination of psychedelic synth quirks, verdant folk melodies, acid-churning sludge, and a sundry of timbres balmy, bitter, and beatific.Comprised of Cam Lofstrad (drums, synths, guitars, bass, vocals, etc.) and Duncan Park (guitars, bass, banjo, jaw harp, vocals), the duo embarked on a journey in January of 2019 to the land of the pig children who dwell at the foot of the eponymous mountain. Rife with experimentation, their compositions schlepped the disheveled pathways and obtuse gradients through pastel flora and alien fauna to further illustrate the extraordinary landscapes only vaguely captured in the album’s artwork. On their latest release, however, Worm Mountain eschews a return trip to the pig children and instead focus on cryptids, some well-known and others esoteric (at least to us). With this shift unfurls new vectors of sound. Still, Duncan’s serene acoustic melodies percolate and aberrations of desert-tinged synth sting, but these moments are exhaled in vivacious spells amidst caustic deluges of grindcore and blackened spew. Their knack for suturing these disparate timbres together remains steadfast and though we miss the pig children and their antics, Therianthropy is an astonishing showcase of the duo’s ever-evolving capabilities. We had a hell of a lot to say about this record, from the cryptids it pays homage to as well as the wonderfully strange chasers accompanying their brand of psychedelic tonic. Thank you so much for tuning in.





































































    * * * * * *Acquire a digital copy of Therianthopy via Return to Worm Mountain’s Bandcamp page. Be sure to follow the monster whisperers on Facebook to stay in the loop on new developments from the duo.If you’d like to support us beyond listening to our podcast,

    • 1 hr 33 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
11 Ratings

11 Ratings

Sklawlor ,

amazing podcast

An excellent podcast where you will discover music from the underground as well as hear ground breaking interviews with today's leading voices of many different genres. Highly recommended.

Jake Holley ,

Great resource

Met Ryan at Fire in the Mountains festival in Wyoming. He has a deep knowledge of obscure, heavy music and this is a great resource for discovering new bands. Keep up the good work!

Top Podcasts In Music Commentary

Listeners Also Subscribed To