49 min

Gender Diversity & Kidney Care Hot Topics in Kidney Health

    • Health & Fitness

The most commonly used equation that determines someone’s kidney function includes a binary male-female sex coefficient. But what does this mean for the care of transgender, gender-diverse, and nonbinary people? Cameron Whitley, an associate professor with kidney failure experience, and researchers Keila Turino Miranda, a PhD student, and Dr. David Collister, a nephrologist, shed light on this important topic.
 
Dr. David Collister (he/him) is a Kidney Doctor, Clinician-Scientist and Assistant Professor at the University of Alberta. He has a PhD in Health Research Methodology from McMaster University. His research program is funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and the Kidney Foundation of Canada and focuses on randomized controlled trials of interventions for uremic symptoms, cannabinoids, the responsiveness of uremic symptoms to the initiation of dialysis, metabolomics, proteomics and the intersection of gender diversity and kidney disease.
Keila Turino Miranda (she/her) is a first year PhD Student in the Cardiovascular Health and Autonomic Regulation Laboratory at McGill University. Ms. Turino Miranda’s work focuses on understanding and addressing the unique healthcare needs and disparities faced by transgender, gender-diverse, and non-binary (TGD) individuals in the realms of nephrology and cardiology using a patient-oriented approach.
Cameron T. Whitley, Ph.D. (he/they) is an Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology at Western Washington University. He studies issues concerning the environment, human-animal relationships, and transgender-affirming medicine. He got involved with studying transgender-affirming medicine when he was diagnosed with kidney failure and received a kidney transplant while writing his dissertation. Through this process, he coauthored one of the first articles addressing the discrepancies in evaluating kidney function for transgender people. He has over five dozen publications featured in places like Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Academic Emergency Medicine, Clinical Chemistry, and Annual Review of Sociology.
 
Additional resources:
Kidney Function in a Gender Diverse Landscape
 
Do you have comments, questions, or suggestions? Email us at NKFpodcast@kidney.org. Also, make sure to rate and review us wherever you listen to podcasts.

The most commonly used equation that determines someone’s kidney function includes a binary male-female sex coefficient. But what does this mean for the care of transgender, gender-diverse, and nonbinary people? Cameron Whitley, an associate professor with kidney failure experience, and researchers Keila Turino Miranda, a PhD student, and Dr. David Collister, a nephrologist, shed light on this important topic.
 
Dr. David Collister (he/him) is a Kidney Doctor, Clinician-Scientist and Assistant Professor at the University of Alberta. He has a PhD in Health Research Methodology from McMaster University. His research program is funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and the Kidney Foundation of Canada and focuses on randomized controlled trials of interventions for uremic symptoms, cannabinoids, the responsiveness of uremic symptoms to the initiation of dialysis, metabolomics, proteomics and the intersection of gender diversity and kidney disease.
Keila Turino Miranda (she/her) is a first year PhD Student in the Cardiovascular Health and Autonomic Regulation Laboratory at McGill University. Ms. Turino Miranda’s work focuses on understanding and addressing the unique healthcare needs and disparities faced by transgender, gender-diverse, and non-binary (TGD) individuals in the realms of nephrology and cardiology using a patient-oriented approach.
Cameron T. Whitley, Ph.D. (he/they) is an Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology at Western Washington University. He studies issues concerning the environment, human-animal relationships, and transgender-affirming medicine. He got involved with studying transgender-affirming medicine when he was diagnosed with kidney failure and received a kidney transplant while writing his dissertation. Through this process, he coauthored one of the first articles addressing the discrepancies in evaluating kidney function for transgender people. He has over five dozen publications featured in places like Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Academic Emergency Medicine, Clinical Chemistry, and Annual Review of Sociology.
 
Additional resources:
Kidney Function in a Gender Diverse Landscape
 
Do you have comments, questions, or suggestions? Email us at NKFpodcast@kidney.org. Also, make sure to rate and review us wherever you listen to podcasts.

49 min

Top Podcasts In Health & Fitness

Huberman Lab
Scicomm Media
The School of Greatness
Lewis Howes
On Purpose with Jay Shetty
iHeartPodcasts
Nothing much happens: bedtime stories to help you sleep
iHeartPodcasts
Ten Percent Happier with Dan Harris
Ten Percent Happier
The Dr. John Delony Show
Ramsey Network