189 episodes

Have You Herd? is brought to you by the American Association of Bovine Practitioners, an international association of cattle veterinarians and veterinary students dedicated to the health, productivity and welfare of cattle.

Have You Herd? AABP PodCasts AABP

    • Education
    • 4.7 • 29 Ratings

Have You Herd? is brought to you by the American Association of Bovine Practitioners, an international association of cattle veterinarians and veterinary students dedicated to the health, productivity and welfare of cattle.

    Ep. 187 - Case Report: Systemic Granulomatous Disease with Vasculitis in a Bull due to Hairy Vetch (Vicia villosa) Toxicosis

    Ep. 187 - Case Report: Systemic Granulomatous Disease with Vasculitis in a Bull due to Hairy Vetch (Vicia villosa) Toxicosis

    AABP Executive Director Dr. Fred Gingrich is joined by Dr. Lee Jones, technical services veterinarian with Boehringer-Ingelheim. Dr. Jones was previously an extension veterinarian at the University of Georgia and the attending veterinarian for this clinical case report published in The Bovine Practitioner, Volume 57, Number 2. Hairy vetch (Vicia villosa) is a forage, and intoxication from the plant has been described in the literature, although this is a very unusual case. This case affected one animal in the herd, a 5-year-old Angus bull. The bull presented with generalized alopecia, thickened pleated skin and profuse malodorous watery diarrhea. This bull, along with 6 other beef bulls, had been grazing in a pasture containing hairy vetch for 5-6 months. Jones described the diagnostic samples that were taken to evaluate the bull and rule out other causes of systemic granulomatous disease and vasculitis. The bull was euthanized due to poor prognosis and deteriorating clinical condition. Necropsy revealed a disseminated systemic granulomatous disease with variable numbers of multinucleated giant cells and eosinophils was observed in multiple organs indicative of systemic granulomatous disease, along with vasculitis in the kidney, liver and adrenal gland, indicative that vasculitis is involved in the pathogenesis of the lesions. None of the other animals were removed from the pasture and they did not develop clinical signs. Jones indicates that practitioners should consider a full diagnostic work-up on these unusual cases which can include punch biopsies of the skin which revealed the vasculitis and granulomatous lesions. 
    Ilha, M. R., Hawkins, I. K., & Jones, A. L. (2023). Case report: Systemic granulomatous disease with vasculitis in a bull due to hairy vetch (Vicia villosa) toxicosis. The Bovine Practitioner, 57(2), 60–66. https://doi.org/10.21423/bovine-vol27no2p60-66 
    Washburn, K., Norman, T., Osterstock, J., & Respondek, T. (2007). Hairy vetch (Vicia villosa) toxicosis in a purebred Angus herd. The Bovine Practitioner, 41(1), 60–64. https://doi.org/10.21423/bovine-vol41no1p60-64
     
     

    • 25 min
    Ep. 186 - Comparison of Electronic Nose and Conventional Cow-side Diagnostic Tools for Detection of Ketosis in Early Lactation Dairy Cows

    Ep. 186 - Comparison of Electronic Nose and Conventional Cow-side Diagnostic Tools for Detection of Ketosis in Early Lactation Dairy Cows

    AABP Executive Director Dr. Fred Gingrich is joined by Conrad Schelkopf to discuss a recent paper published in The Bovine Practitioner Volume 57 Number 2. Conrad is a dual DVM/PhD student at Kansas State University College of Veterinary Medicine. The title of the paper is “Comparison of electronic nose and conventional cow-side diagnostic tools for detection of ketosis in early lactation dairy cows”.  We review the various types of ketones that are measure by different diagnostic tests in dairy cows. The average economic impact of a case of ketosis in a dairy cow published in the literature is about $300, and having reliable and effective diagnostic tests can be a valuable tool for dairy producers. 
    Electronic nose technology has been used in human medicine for disease diagnosis, but little research has been done in veterinary medicine. The technology “sniffs” samples that has a variety of sensors that detects a variety of volatile compounds in the space above the sample. The paper discusses how the tool is trained and calibrated for this experiment to create a fingerprint to match that fingerprint to different samples. 
    The objective of this study was to compare the eNose technology to the urine ketone test strips and blood BHBA  cow-side diagnostic tools and to evaluate the applicability to clinical practice in a production setting. The eNose technology had lower sensitivity and specificity vs. the Precision Xtra and urine ketone tests. Conrad also discusses the positive and negative predictive value of each test based on the estimated prevalence of the disease. Conrad also discusses some potential future applications of the eNose device in booth beef and dairy practice. Emerging technologies and research to validate these technologies in the field is an important area of new research in cattle practice to improve cattle health, welfare and productivity.  
    Schelkopf, C. S., Apley, M. D., & Lubbers, B. V. (2023). Comparison of electronic nose and conventional cow-side diagnostic tools for detection of ketosis in early lactation dairy cows. The Bovine Practitioner, 57(2), 5–15. https://doi.org/10.21423/bovine-vol27no2p5-16
     
     

    • 32 min
    Ep. 185 – Best Practices for Colostrum Management in Beef Calves

    Ep. 185 – Best Practices for Colostrum Management in Beef Calves

    AABP Executive Director Dr. Fred Gingrich is joined by Dr. Clair Windeyer, Associate Professor at the University of Calgary Faculty of Veterinary Medicine. This podcast is brought to you by the ad hoc AABP Cattle Youngstock Committee. If you are interested in joining an AABP committee, please go to the committee page on the AABP website to find a committee of interest and on each committee page is a contact button to let us know you would like to join. 
    We start our podcast by explaining the differences between colostrum recommendation for dairy vs. beef calves. Windeyer reports that research shows that up to 33% of beef calves demonstrate failure of passive transfer (FPT) and it can be challenging to identify calves that need assistance before the window of opportunity closes to ensure calves receive adequate colostrum. Calves that have FPT have an 8x higher odds of treatment for any disease and an 18x higher risk of all-cause mortality. If calves have greater than 24 g/L of IgG, they have a 10x lower risk of dying preweaning and about 0.2 pounds increased average dairy gain. From a financial perspective, each case of FPT costs on average $80.
    Windeyer discusses how to identify calves that are at risk so that we do not interrupt maternal bonding. This can include calves born to heifers, twins, assisted pulls, and those with lack of suckle reflex. We also discuss how to properly train producers to tube feed calves colostrum if they will not drink from the bottle as well as what type of colostrum to feed the calf. 
    Veterinarians have tremendous opportunity to work with cow-calf producers to ensure calves receive adequate colostrum and develop programs to train producers how to assist and monitoring the success of those programs. 
    LINKS:
    Beef Cattle Research Council YouTube video link on how to properly use an esophageal tube feeder.
    Beef Calf Vigor Assessment Podcast with Dr Elizabeth Homerosky
    Publications mentioned in the podcast by Gamsjäger, Lisa, et al.:
    Impact of volume, immunoglobulin G concentration, and feeding method of colostrum product on neonatal nursing behavior and transfer of passive immunity in beef calves https://doi.org/10.1016/j.animal.2021.100345
    Total and pathogen-specific serum Immunoglobulin G concentrations in neonatal beef calves, Part 2: Associations with health and growth https://doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2023.105993
    Total and pathogen-specific serum Immunoglobulin G concentrations in neonatal beef calves, Part 1: Risk factor https://doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2023.106026
    Assessment of Brix refractometry to estimate immunoglobulin G concentration in beef cow colostrum https://doi.org/10.1111/jvim.15805
    Evaluation of 3 refractometers to determine transfer of passive immunity in neonatal beef calves. https://doi.org/10.1111/jvim.16016
     

    • 27 min
    Ep. 184 - Effect of Maternal Bovine Appeasing Substance (MBAS) on Health and Performance of Preweaned Dairy Calves

    Ep. 184 - Effect of Maternal Bovine Appeasing Substance (MBAS) on Health and Performance of Preweaned Dairy Calves

    AABP Executive Director Dr. Fred Gingrich is joined by Dr. Reinaldo Cooke, a professor at Texas A&M Animal Sciences Department. Cooke was one of the investigators on a paper published in the AABP Bovine Practitioner Volume 57 Number 2, “Effect of maternal bovine appeasing substance on health and performance of preweaned dairy calves”.  Maternal appeasing pheromone is secreted by the mammary gland of all lactating animals and the MBAS is an analog of that pheromone for use in cattle. The substance has an appeasing or calming effect on calves. This study was done on a commercial dairy in the northeast U.S. to evaluate health outcomes in treated vs. untreated calves. Application of MBAS decreased the incidence of diarrhea (71% in controls and 59% in treated calves) and decreased mortality (7.8% in controls and 2.4% in treated calves). Cooke describes other publications for use of MBAS in bovine practice including calves at placement to feedyards, finished cattle before shipping to a packing plant, at weaning in cow-calf herds, and preweaning in dairy calves. He also discussed opportunities for future research in use of the product in adult animals, such as decreasing stress in fresh dairy cows. Cooke also discusses some of the economic analysis for use of the product at various stages of production with a return on investment found in various studies of 20:1 To 30:1. 
    Bringhenti, L., Colombo, E., Rodrigues, M. X., & Cooke, R. F. (2023). Effect of maternal bovine appeasing substance on health and performance of preweaned dairy calves. The Bovine Practitioner, 57(2), 1–4. https://doi.org/10.21423/bovine-vol27no2p1-4
    Kelsey M Schubach, Reinaldo F Cooke, Courtney L Daigle, Alice P Brandão, Bruna Rett, Vitor S M Ferreira, Giovanna N Scatolin, Eduardo A Colombo, Genevieve M D’Souza, Ky G Pohler, Bruno I Cappellozza, Administering an appeasing substance to beef calves at weaning to optimize productive and health responses during a 42-d preconditioning program, Journal of Animal Science, Volume 98, Issue 9, September 2020, skaa269, https://doi.org/10.1093/jas/skaa269
    Cappellozza, B.I.; Cooke, R.F. Administering an Appeasing Substance to Improve Performance, Neuroendocrine Stress Response, and Health of Ruminants. Animals 2022, 12, 2432. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani12182432
    Vieira, D.G.; Vedovatto, M.; Fernandes, H.J.; Lima, E.d.A.; D’Oliveira, M.C.; Curcio, U.d.A.; Ranches, J.; Ferreira, M.F.; Sousa, O.A.d.; Cappellozza, B.I.; et al. Effects of an Appeasing Substance Application at Weaning on Growth, Stress, Behavior, and Response to Vaccination of Bos indicus Calves. Animals 2023, 13, 3033. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani13193033
     
     

    • 24 min
    Ep. 183 - Treatment of Digital Dermatitis

    Ep. 183 - Treatment of Digital Dermatitis

    AABP Executive Director Dr. Fred Gingrich is joined by Dr. Anne Murphy and Dr. Karin Orsel in this episode to discuss a common cause of lameness, digital dermatitis. Our guests start by describing this disease that was first identified in 1972 and has spread around the world. The disease is seen in most dairy farms in the U.S. as well as in feedlots and cow-calf operations. Even though the disease has been identified on many farms for many years, we do not know the exact mechanism of the disease or if the Treponema bacteria is the sole implicating factor in its development. There are several factors that lead to the development of the disease, such as creating the “right” environment for the bacteria to grow. Orsel discusses some of the challenges with vaccine development for preventing the disease as well as some genetic parameters within breeds that can influence the disease. Murphy discusses the importance of performing a full lameness exam to ensure veterinarians, hoof trimmers, and farm employees can correctly diagnose the cause of the lameness. Treatment for digital dermatitis typically involves a topical antibiotic such as tetracycline. Since this is extralabel use of an antibiotic, the veterinarian must prescribe the medication to the farm. Murphy also discusses the importance of foot baths and biosecurity measures to control and prevent the disease on farms.  
    Our guests also discuss the resources available to AABP members on the Lameness Committee resource page. This includes a review of treatments available to treat digital dermatitis and the available scientific evidence to support their claims found here. Other resources can be found at this link,  then click on the Lameness Committee tab or Resources from another AABP committee.  
    If you are interested in joining the Lameness Committee, or another AABP committee, please send an email to fred@aabp.org.  
    Genetic parameters for hoof lesions and their relationship with feet and leg traits in Canadian Holstein cows.
    N. Chapinal, A. Koeck, A. Sewalem, D.F. Kelton, S. Mason, G. Cramer, F. Miglior
    Journal of Dairy Science, Volume 96, Issue 4, 2013.
    https://doi.org/10.3168/jds.2012-6071
     

    • 24 min
    Evaluation of the Treatment Efficacy of Generic Enrofloxacin Compared to Pioneer Enrofloxacin for First Treatment of Naturally Occurring Bovine Respiratory Disease in a Commercial Feedlot -- Sponsored by Virbac

    Evaluation of the Treatment Efficacy of Generic Enrofloxacin Compared to Pioneer Enrofloxacin for First Treatment of Naturally Occurring Bovine Respiratory Disease in a Commercial Feedlot -- Sponsored by Virbac

    AABP Executive Director Dr. Fred Gingrich is joined by Dr. Miles Theurer from Veterinary Research and Consulting Services. Theurer was the lead author of the paper “Evaluation of the treatment efficacy of generic enrofloxacin compared to pioneer enrofloxacin for first treatment of naturally occurring bovine respiratory disease in a commercial feedlot” published in The Bovine Practitioner Volume 57 Number 2. This episode is sponsored by Virbac. After more than 50 years of helping animals around the world, Virbac wants to emphasize that they are here for you, committed to your growth and that of your customers for the long haul. For more information on Virbac or their products, visit https://vet-us.virbac.com/cattle. 
    Theurer discusses the reasons that a large clinical trial comparing a generic product to the pioneer product in a field setting can assist veterinarians in making treatment decisions when recommending animal health products to their clients. Theurer walks us through the objectives and methods of the paper. Results of this paper did not find any significant differences in health outcomes evaluated for first treatment of BRD with the two products. He also discusses some of the differences identified between traditional beef breeds enrolled in the study and dairy-beef crosses which is an opportunity for future research. 
    Theurer discusses his role as an associate editor for The Bovine Practitioner and encourages researchers to submit clinically relevant research to the journal. The journal is intended to provide research relevant to the practicing cattle veterinarian and is available open-access with no publication fees. The submission and review process is managed online. Find the journal at this link.

    Theurer, M. E., Fox, T., Newberry, J. R., & Payot, F. (2023). Evaluation of the treatment efficacy of generic enrofloxacin compared to pioneer enrofloxacin for first treatment of naturally occurring bovine respiratory disease in a commercial feedlot. The Bovine Practitioner, 57(2), 29–35. https://doi.org/10.21423/bovine-vol27no2p29-35
    Product label and safety information for Tenotryl located on this page. 
    CATTLE IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION
    Tenotryl™ (enrofloxacin) 100 mg/ml Antimicrobial Injectable Solution: Animals intended for human consumption must not be slaughtered within 28 days from the last treatment. This product is not approved for use in female dairy cattle 20 months of age or older, including dry dairy cows.  Use in these cattle may cause drug residues in milk and/or in the calves born to these cows.  A withdrawal period has not been established for this product in pre-ruminating calves.  Do not exceed a 20 mL dose per injection site.  Federal (USA) law prohibits the extra-label use of this drug in food producing animals.
     
     

    • 33 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
29 Ratings

29 Ratings

Bntrss ,

Great Podcast

This podcast has everything a Herd Check specialist wants and needs. Dr. Fred is diving deep and this is essential listening for those in the industry. The "Call me on the phone line, I'll put my arm up in your bovine" line in the song intro is hilarious and very clever. Great job AABP and Dr. Fred Gingrich.

Top Podcasts In Education

Mel Robbins
Mark Manson
Dr. Jordan B. Peterson
Duolingo
Rich Roll
Nicole Kalil

You Might Also Like

Jared Luhman
Clay Conry
Damian Mason
Clinician's Brief
David Whitaker, Corey Hillebo
Dr. Justine Lee, DACVECC, DABT and Dr. Garret Pachinger, DACVECC