40 min

How to Navigate a Federal Bid Protest—with Carissa Siebeneck Anderson - EP107 The RFP Success Show

    • Management

So, your small business lost out on a federal bid. But you feel like you were unfairly scored or that the contract requirements were biased. Do you file a protest?
Carissa Siebeneck Anderson is Of Counsel at the Washington DC Office of Birch Horton Bittner & Cherot. She has expertise in the realm of small business government contracting, SBA 8(a), HUBZone, women- and veteran-owned programs, and she regularly represents clients in bid protests.
Prior to joining Birch Horton Bittner & Cherot, Carissa worked as Government & Legislative Affairs Associate for Navajo Nation and served as Management and Program analyst for the US Secret Service.
On this episode of the RFP Success Show, Carissa joins me to discuss federal bid protests, weighing in on the most common reasons for filing a bid protest and why she recommends filing through the Government Accountability Office or GAO.
She explains the role of the protester, the procuring agency and the intervener in a bid protest, exploring when a solicitation or contract can be protested and how much time you have to file.
Listen in for Carissa's advice on deciding whether the cost of a protest is worth it for your small business and navigating the process of filing a federal bid protest.
Key Takeaways  How Carissa’s background in intelligence led to her current focus on government contracts law
The most common reasons for filing a pre-award or post-award bid protest
The 3 places where you can bring a bid protest and why the Government Accountability Office is the most popular venue
The role of an intervener in a bid protest and why the awardee should always file to intervene
When it makes sense to intervene if you’re not the awardee
How to decide whether the cost of filing a bid protest is worth it for your small business
How a bid protest impacts a company’s relationship with the procuring agency
What it means to be an interested party to a bid protest
When a company that’s been disqualified can file a bid protest
How the status of a procuring agency and the nature of the transaction affect whether a solicitation or contract can be protested
How much time you have to file a bid protest from the time you knew of the protest grounds
How a CICA stay requires a federal agency to suspend the contract award/performance while a protest is pending 
Connect with Carissa Birch Horton Bittner & Cherot
Birch Horton Bittner & Cherot on LinkedIn
Birch Horton Bittner & Cherot on Facebook
Email canderson@bhb.com 
Connect with Lisa  Lisa’s Website
Lisa on Twitter
Lisa on Facebook
Lisa on LinkedIn
The RFP Success Company on YouTube
The RFP Success Company on LinkedIn
Subscribe on iTunes
Email podcast@rfpsuccess.com 
Resources US Court of Federal Claims
US Government Accountability Office
Competition in Contracting Act
Book a Call with the RFP Success Company
Dare to Be Influential: Maximizing Your Positive Influence While Still Being True to You by Lisa Rehurek
The RFP Success Book by Lisa Rehurek
The RFP Success Institute

So, your small business lost out on a federal bid. But you feel like you were unfairly scored or that the contract requirements were biased. Do you file a protest?
Carissa Siebeneck Anderson is Of Counsel at the Washington DC Office of Birch Horton Bittner & Cherot. She has expertise in the realm of small business government contracting, SBA 8(a), HUBZone, women- and veteran-owned programs, and she regularly represents clients in bid protests.
Prior to joining Birch Horton Bittner & Cherot, Carissa worked as Government & Legislative Affairs Associate for Navajo Nation and served as Management and Program analyst for the US Secret Service.
On this episode of the RFP Success Show, Carissa joins me to discuss federal bid protests, weighing in on the most common reasons for filing a bid protest and why she recommends filing through the Government Accountability Office or GAO.
She explains the role of the protester, the procuring agency and the intervener in a bid protest, exploring when a solicitation or contract can be protested and how much time you have to file.
Listen in for Carissa's advice on deciding whether the cost of a protest is worth it for your small business and navigating the process of filing a federal bid protest.
Key Takeaways  How Carissa’s background in intelligence led to her current focus on government contracts law
The most common reasons for filing a pre-award or post-award bid protest
The 3 places where you can bring a bid protest and why the Government Accountability Office is the most popular venue
The role of an intervener in a bid protest and why the awardee should always file to intervene
When it makes sense to intervene if you’re not the awardee
How to decide whether the cost of filing a bid protest is worth it for your small business
How a bid protest impacts a company’s relationship with the procuring agency
What it means to be an interested party to a bid protest
When a company that’s been disqualified can file a bid protest
How the status of a procuring agency and the nature of the transaction affect whether a solicitation or contract can be protested
How much time you have to file a bid protest from the time you knew of the protest grounds
How a CICA stay requires a federal agency to suspend the contract award/performance while a protest is pending 
Connect with Carissa Birch Horton Bittner & Cherot
Birch Horton Bittner & Cherot on LinkedIn
Birch Horton Bittner & Cherot on Facebook
Email canderson@bhb.com 
Connect with Lisa  Lisa’s Website
Lisa on Twitter
Lisa on Facebook
Lisa on LinkedIn
The RFP Success Company on YouTube
The RFP Success Company on LinkedIn
Subscribe on iTunes
Email podcast@rfpsuccess.com 
Resources US Court of Federal Claims
US Government Accountability Office
Competition in Contracting Act
Book a Call with the RFP Success Company
Dare to Be Influential: Maximizing Your Positive Influence While Still Being True to You by Lisa Rehurek
The RFP Success Book by Lisa Rehurek
The RFP Success Institute

40 min