106 episodes

Find an eclectic collection of authors, philosophers, filmmakers and thinkers who explore essential aspects of what makes us human. Visit uctv.tv/humanities

Humanities (Video‪)‬ UCTV

    • Society & Culture
    • 2.5 • 2 Ratings

Find an eclectic collection of authors, philosophers, filmmakers and thinkers who explore essential aspects of what makes us human. Visit uctv.tv/humanities

    • video
    CARTA - Humans: The Planet-Altering Apes - Human Transformation From Environmental Managers to Ecosystem Damagers with Jessica Thompson

    CARTA - Humans: The Planet-Altering Apes - Human Transformation From Environmental Managers to Ecosystem Damagers with Jessica Thompson

    Beginning with Homo erectus at least a million years ago, hominins have used fire to engineer the world around them. The earliest uses of fire surely included cooking, changing the energy yields of foods. Such innovations altered the course of our evolution, facilitating the evolution of species that could adapt quickly using tools and social ingenuity. After 200,000 years ago, hominins also used fire to change the material properties of stone, pigments, sap, and wood. Although these changes represent a fundamental shift in the role of humans as dominant shapers of their environments, ecosystems adjusted as early humans remained embedded within them. Although we built our ability to bend environments to our needs on millions of years of evolution and innovation, humans are not now simply shifting to another sustainable balance. Rather, we continue to push environmental thresholds across one tipping point after the next. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 37907]

    • 20 min
    • video
    CARTA - Humans: The Planet Altering Apes - Symposium Welcome and Opening Remarks (Ajit Varki)

    CARTA - Humans: The Planet Altering Apes - Symposium Welcome and Opening Remarks (Ajit Varki)

    This CARTA public symposia will address specific examples of how humans have drastically altered the planet. Acknowledged experts will discuss clearly defined global-scale negative impacts on planet earth, our life support system (other than climate change, population growth and infectious diseases, which are well-known). Each talk will succinctly describe a specific impact, the role that our species has played, and conclude with ongoing or potential approaches to mitigation. In the process, we are coming full circle to Anthropogeny, asking how a single species could have evolved the ability to so drastically alter the entire planet. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 38008]

    • 6 min
    • video
    CARTA - Humans: The Planet-Altering Apes - Anthropogenic Global Water Insecurity with Asher Rosinger

    CARTA - Humans: The Planet-Altering Apes - Anthropogenic Global Water Insecurity with Asher Rosinger

    Humans have adapted to meet their water needs across disparate environments over time using behavioral adaptations. Yet, as temperatures rise and freshwater sources become depleted, it is critical to understand 1) how populations modify their environments to meet their water needs, and 2) the consequences of these anthropogenic - or human caused changes - on the environment and further on human health. This talk will provide an overview of different global water challenges and focus on a couple of case studies to highlight how development projects in remote areas that provide easier access to water, which may be high in salt or other contaminants, can unintentionally worsen health outcomes and hasten water depletion. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 37908]

    • 14 min
    • video
    CARTA - Humans: The Planet-Altering Apes - Humans vs. Humankind: Are Human-Made Chemical Pollutants Impacting Global Fertility? with Patricia Hunt

    CARTA - Humans: The Planet-Altering Apes - Humans vs. Humankind: Are Human-Made Chemical Pollutants Impacting Global Fertility? with Patricia Hunt

    Human-made chemicals with the unexpected ability to interfere with our body’s endocrine system have become prominent contaminants in daily life. Because the hormones produced by our endocrine system create complex signaling networks that control our growth, maturation, fertility, immunity, behavior, and sleep, these endocrine disrupting chemicals, or EDCs, can exert powerful biological effects. Declines in human fertility evidenced by falling sperm counts and increases in the incidence of infertility raise concern that daily exposure to EDC contaminants already is impacting human fertility. By design, all species are responsive to their environment. In humans, this responsiveness means that changes in our environment can affect the production of eggs and sperm, the growth and development of the fetus, and adult susceptibility to disease. Thus, in a 21st century world characterized by environmental crises, EDCs represent a planetary health problem with the potential to affect future generations. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 37912]

    • 19 min
    • video
    CARTA - Humans: The Planet-Altering Apes - How to Feed 10 Billion People with Walter Willett

    CARTA - Humans: The Planet-Altering Apes - How to Feed 10 Billion People with Walter Willett

    The world is facing a health crisis due to increasing rates of obesity and diabetes, and the consequences of this pandemic will accumulate over the coming decades. Simultaneously, climate change is accelerating and is already having devastating effects that will undermine our ability to feed the world’s growing population. In turn, our food systems contribute importantly to greenhouse gas emissions, water and land use, and multiple forms of pollution. Thus, a solution to feeding what will be about 10 billion people by 2050 diets that are both healthy and environmentally sustainable presents an opportunity to mitigate many global challenges.

    The EAT-Lancet commission addressed this challenge by defining healthy diets quantitatively, determining whether these can be produced within planetary boundaries for greenhouse gas emissions and other environmental factors, and identifying strategies to achieve these goals. Any solution must assume that we rapidly shift from fossil fuels to green energy. The commission found that global adoption of a flexitarian dietary pattern that could include up to about two servings per day of animal sourced foods, together with improvements in agricultural practices and reductions in food waste, would have major benefits for human health and allow us to stay within planetary boundaries. Achieving this will require the engagement of governments at all levels, civil society, and individuals. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Health and Medicine] [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 37911]

    • 17 min
    • video
    Death In Venice

    Death In Venice

    Moderator Stephanie Malia Hom joined Professor Joan Roman Resina to discuss Death in Venice and the work of filmmaker Luchino Visconti. Resina contextualized the film within the larger context of Visconti’s German trilogy and his long, storied career. He also discussed the film’s adaptation from the Thomas Mann novella. Resina examined the idea of decadence in the film and the aristocratic Venetian milieus, as well as the film’s larger commentary on art and beauty across the mediums of literature, music, and cinema. Series: "Carsey-Wolf Center" [Humanities] [Show ID: 38038]

    • 40 min

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