582 episodes

Real training for HVAC ( Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration) Technicians. Including recorded tech training, interviews, diagnostics and general conversations about the trade.

HVAC School - For Techs, By Techs Bryan Orr

    • Business
    • 4.9 • 854 Ratings

Real training for HVAC ( Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration) Technicians. Including recorded tech training, interviews, diagnostics and general conversations about the trade.

    Do Houses Need to Breathe? w/ Allison Bailes

    Do Houses Need to Breathe? w/ Allison Bailes

    Dr. Allison Bailes from Energy Vanguard joins the podcast to answer the age-old question: do houses need to breathe? He also talks about his new book, A House Needs to Breathe... Or Does It? You can purchase that book directly through the Energy Vanguard site at https://energyvanguardstore.com/ or on Amazon.
    HVAC professionals can benefit from learning about building science because there is a lot of overlap between the two, and an HVAC technician who knows about building science can set themselves apart in the market.
    In short, Dr. Bailes doesn't think a house needs to "breathe," especially if a house brings in low-quality air, especially humid air, through gaps and cracks. Some people also use the term "breathe" differently; some may be referring to leakiness, and others may refer to drying out a house. It is necessary for a house to be dry, but we want to make sure that fresh air is controlled.
    If you build a home tightly, you have to ventilate it correctly. We have to control air, liquid water, water vapor, and heat. Heat is especially complicated, as it has three different ways of moving and can come in sensitive and latent varieties. One way of controlling those is through control layers like vapor barriers, though these aren't always needed; we must understand the vapor flow to determine if a vapor barrier is necessary.
    Dr. Bailes and Bryan also discuss:
    Energy Vanguard's resources The chapters of "A House Needs to Breathe... Or Does It?" IAQ - filtration, humidity control, ventilation, and source control Challenges with attic air Dr. Bailes's book-writing process The HVACR Training Symposium and other events w/ Dr. Bailes  
    Keep up with Energy Vanguard, read the blog, and subscribe to the weekly newsletter at https://www.energyvanguard.com/.
    If you have an iPhone, subscribe to the podcast HERE, and if you have an Android phone, subscribe HERE.
    Check out our handy calculators HERE.

    • 31 min
    What the Heck is High Performance HVAC w/ David Holt

    What the Heck is High Performance HVAC w/ David Holt

    David Holt with the National Comfort Institute (NCI) returns to the podcast to talk about high-performance HVAC and what the heck it even is. 
    High-performance HVAC is all about delivering the highest possible equipment performance out of the box. High-performance HVAC is a key element of NCI's work; equipment should be able to deliver the health, comfort, safety, reliability, and efficiency expected by the occupants, and equipment that can't do that often has root issues we need to troubleshoot and fix. In many cases, the root cause has something to do with airflow issues.
    As contractors, we can focus more heavily on testing fan airflow to get to the bottom of poor HVAC performance, even when there may not be an apparent airflow problem. We need the proper test instrumentation to measure CFM, a key indicator of performance. We can't expect to maximize system performance until the airflow is correct across the heat exchange surfaces.
    Many factors that contribute to poor equipment performance actually have to do with building science, including issues like air leakage. Although HVAC contractors can't control that, we can be successful if we have a culture and mindset that makes us put our customers first and work with the circumstances we're given to deliver the best possible solution.
    David and Bryan also discuss:
    David's role at NCI Manufacturer, distributor, contractor, technician, and customer relationships How to measure CFM effectively Effects of improperly  Issues that arise during building construction Parts vs. equipment vs. systems What makes a good service technician The high-performance mindset Having a classroom vs. a commitment to training  
    If you want to get more involved in HVAC training, you can text David at (706)-332-2212 or visit https://nationalcomfortinstitute.com/pro/. Learn more about NCI's High-Performance HVAC Summit at https://www.gotosummit.com/. 
    Check out the HVACR Training Symposium and order your virtual tickets before, during, or after the symposium (Jan 19-21, 2023) at https://hvacrschool.com/symposium. 
    If you have an iPhone, subscribe to the podcast HERE, and if you have an Android phone, subscribe HERE.
    Check out our handy calculators HERE.

    • 46 min
    Setting Realistic Customer Expectations w/ Ed Janowiak

    Setting Realistic Customer Expectations w/ Ed Janowiak

    Ed Janowiak returns to the podcast to talk about setting realistic customer expectations when designing residential HVAC systems across climates, seasons, and load conditions.
    Being honest and aggressive is one of the best ways to set realistic expectations, and our load calculations and equipment selection need to reflect that. Manual J calculations must consider non-design days, not just the design conditions, including partial load conditions. Partial load conditions that aren't accounted for may make it more difficult for the HVAC system to control latent heat, potentially leading to moisture problems indoors.
    We have to set expectations in the summer a bit differently than we set expectations in the winter, and we must account for the equipment type when we create expectations. Heat pumps perform differently than furnaces, and oversized furnaces typically present fewer problems than oversized heat pumps in areas with high latent loads. 
    Clients must also be willing to acknowledge that systems won't perform exactly as designed during partial load conditions. You can put the information in writing and make clients sign the paperwork to ensure that they understand the expectations you've set. Laying out expectations and making clients read them is a good way to prevent conflict or identify clients that may not accept the expectations.
    Ed and Bryan also discuss:
    Ed's three "Hate Me" reasons Oversizing furnaces vs. straight-cool A/C units vs. heat pumps Electrification Heat pumps in cold climates Humid vs. arid climates Designing systems with ancillary dehumidification Not being responsible for clients' lifestyle choices ACCA collaboration and industry support  
    Learn more about the training ACCA has to offer at https://www.acca.org.
    Check out the HVACR Training Symposium and order your virtual tickets before, during, or after the symposium (Jan 19-21, 2023) at https://hvacrschool.com/symposium. 
    If you have an iPhone, subscribe to the podcast HERE, and if you have an Android phone, subscribe HERE.
    Check out our handy calculators HERE.

    • 45 min
    Mini Split Install and Service Tips

    Mini Split Install and Service Tips

    Craig Migliaccio, aka AC Service Tech, returns to the podcast to share his knowledge about mini-split install & service. He also talks a bit about his upcoming book, “Inverter Mini-Split Operation and Service Procedures.”
    Mini-splits are unique because they are compartmentalized in ways that traditional central-air ducted systems are not. Mini-splits come in many varieties, including ducted and ductless types, as well as multi-zone types. Many are inverter-driven and have more electrical efficiency as a result and can vary their capacities based on load variation. 
    Mini-splits have metering devices at their outdoor units, and these devices may be electric expansion valves (EEVs) or capillary tubes. Inverter mini-splits also don’t have filter driers because their PVE oil doesn’t have the same acid concerns as POE oil, and they don’t have traditional liquid lines.
    Flare connections are also critical when installing ductless systems, especially because you want systems to be tight to prevent leaking and contamination. Craig likes eccentric flaring tools with offset cones, and he recommends using flare nuts from the equipment manufacturer, not the line set manufacturer. He covers other flaring best practices as well.
    The charge is quite small in mini-splits, so weighing the charge and being careful and deliberate during charging is critical. Refrigerant leaks can also be highly problematic; corrosion and poor flare connections are common causes of leaks. 
    Craig and Bryan also discuss:
    Hyper-heat systems Coefficient of performance (COP) and BTU output Moving between PSC and ECM or inverter technologies Mini-splits vs. VRF/VRV technologies Pressure testing and leak detection Compressor diagnosis  Thermistors and electrical resistance Heat sinks and mounting circuit boards Selecting a location to install a mini-split Things to consider when checking the charge Why measure superheat and subcooling? Cleaning and maintenance best practices  
    Check out Craig’s YouTube channel at https://www.youtube.com/@acservicetech. 
    Starting January 1st, 2023, you can buy Craig’s book on his website, which has a bunch of other good resources. Visit that site at https://www.acservicetech.com/.
    If you have an iPhone, subscribe to the podcast HERE, and if you have an Android phone, subscribe HERE.
    Check out our handy calculators HERE.

    • 50 min
    CO Doesn't Leak w/ David Richardson

    CO Doesn't Leak w/ David Richardson

    David Richardson from NCI returns to the podcast to talk about why CO (carbon monoxide) doesn't leak and what it does instead.
    CO is a highly dangerous gas that is colorless and odorless, and we can keep ourselves safe by staying aware of it with personal low-level CO monitors. However, CO doesn't leak; it spills, especially via backdrafting, a blocked flue, or updrafting. Whenever the flue gas comes back inside the structure unintentionally, there is room for a potential CO problem. With proper testing, we can determine the cause of that spillage and make the best choice to stop it from happening.
    When there is an excessive draft, there's often turbulence in the draft hoods, which leads to spillage. Spillage commonly happens at the draft hood, but it can also happen near the burner compartment of a gas appliance. Smoke tests won't detect that, but CO testing will. However, we need to look for rising CO levels over the run cycle of the equipment. If you test CO levels in the ducts, you're only seeing how the fans are distributing the CO; you're not checking the likely source of CO. Water heaters often give visual clues of improper venting, especially if there's soot, rust near the venting, or discoloration near the burner compartment.
    David and Bryan also cover:
    CO poisoning symptoms CO monitors vs. alarms The roles of stack effect and airflow in CO spillage Air taking the path of least resistance CO testing best practices CO and changes in sinus pressure Combustible gas leak detectors Low-level CO monitors Wind and its effects on pressurization or depressurization Electric appliances, generators, and CO poisoning  
    Learn more about NCI's training courses at http://nationalcomfortinstitute.com/. You can also contact David directly at davidr@ncihvac.com. 
    If you have an iPhone, subscribe to the podcast HERE, and if you have an Android phone, subscribe HERE.
    Check out our handy calculators HERE.

    • 38 min
    One HSI Furnace Control to Rule Them All w/ Jim Fultz

    One HSI Furnace Control to Rule Them All w/ Jim Fultz

    Jim Fultz with Emerson White-Rodgers returns to the podcast to talk about one HSI furnace control to rule them all, the 50M56X-843 Universal Single Stage Integrated Furnace Control.
    The 50M56X does not come with wiring harnesses; the control comes with the plugs that the majority of manufacturers use, making it a versatile and user-friendly universal part. It also works with the White-Rodgers Connect app to help you configure the part with the burners. You can also do some basic configuration when it comes to the blower motor. With the 50M56X and Emerson White-Rodgers Connect app combination, you can quickly and accurately configure the control without wi-fi or a password. 
    An igniter is included in the box with the 50M56X; the igniter must match the control. The control also comes with a three-digit display that communicates the microamp current from the flame sensor, meaning you don’t need to use a meter on the flame sensor. So, you can carry less truck stock and complete more calls with this universal part.
    The device also has some potentially useful extra features. For example, the 50M56X stores error codes for 14 days, not permanently, to prevent causing confusion for future technicians. It also has a bus connector for the thermostat and a dehumidification terminal for thermostats with dehumidification capabilities.
    Jim and Bryan also cover:
    White-Rodgers universal vs. aftermarket vs. OEM parts Blower speed and X13, ECM, and PSC motors Near-field communication (NFC) capabilities  Cross-referencing Technology and ethical business 50M56X warranty information Integration with Sensi thermostats WR Mobile App (available on Google Play and the App Store)  
    Learn about Emerson White-Rodgers and their featured products on our partner page HERE.
    Check out the wide array of products and resources Emerson White-Rodgers has to offer at https://emerson.com/universalcontrols.
    If you have an iPhone, subscribe to the podcast HERE, and if you have an Android phone, subscribe HERE.
    Check out our handy calculators HERE.

    • 39 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
854 Ratings

854 Ratings

friend of jackD ,

Dr chuck 12-15-2022

He danced around the chemical name but he was talking about Teflon…. They have to go back to ww2 blood draws to not find that chemical in the blood of people. There’s a documentary about teflon on how DuPont was dumping it into the river system and the birth defects, cancers in the workers.

Isaac_Campos94 ,

It’s just great!!!

I still remember the day I found out about this podcast, it was 2017. I had recently started working for the company that opened the doors for me to this awesome trade. I can say I learned a ton from Bryan and his guests, from Erick Kaiser, Eric Mele, Trevor Mathew’s, Ty Branaman, Genry García etc. It’s hard to mention them all. If you are just starting your journey to this trade this is the best source to get educated. Thank you Bryan and thanks to all the guests that take the time to participate.

Zaphoid's cousin ,

Love it.

Loads of information in this podcast broken up into manageable nuggets.

Top Podcasts In Business

Erika Kullberg
Freakonomics Network & Zachary Crockett
Ramsey Network
NPR
Jocko DEFCOR Network
Guy Raz | Wondery

You Might Also Like

HVAC Know It All
Zack Psioda
Craig Migliaccio
Gil Cavey
CE
Bill Spohn