100 episodes

I Like Your Work supports artists! Each week artist Erika b Hess interviews artists, gallerists, collectors, and curators to cover topics that will help you in your art practice! From inspiring interviews from the lives of artists to business practices you will walk away ready to get in the studio!

I Like Your Work: Conversations with Artists, Curators & Collectors Erika b Hess

    • Arts
    • 4.9 • 150 Ratings

I Like Your Work supports artists! Each week artist Erika b Hess interviews artists, gallerists, collectors, and curators to cover topics that will help you in your art practice! From inspiring interviews from the lives of artists to business practices you will walk away ready to get in the studio!

    Khari Turner: Painting Black Bodies of Water

    Khari Turner: Painting Black Bodies of Water

    “I paint to create a deeper connection to my identity and history as a Black American. Metaphorically, I see Black people as personifications of the magic that is the ocean. My paintings and drawings combine abstraction with realistic renderings of Black noses and lips to rejuvenate the relationship of my history to my ancestor’s history with water. I use water from oceans, lakes, and rivers from places that have either a historical or personal connection to black history -- water that I collect to mix with and pour onto my paintings. My focus is to create a direct relationship to my emotions and understanding of my past, a journey of spiritual connection. I focus on Black history to celebrate my ancestors for surviving the challenges they faced, not to display their pain. I paint to bring the stories and histories with images holding an elegance and chaos that comes with this existence.” 
    Khari Turner is an artist and a Milwaukee, WI native who lived there until the Spring of 2015. The influence of Milwaukee shows itself often in his work, especially with the use of water. Set on the coast of Lake Michigan and located at the merging of three rivers, Milwaukee is truly a water city and Khari often sat next to the water in reflection. At a young age, he took an interest in art from school peers and his grandfather, a draftsman and carpenter.
    Khari found himself struggling between 2009 and 2015 which has been a big influence on the work he does currently. During this time, Khari wasn’t in school and found himself working a minimum wage retail job and switching between warehouse jobs.  He worked for the NBA as entertainment some nights but life was stale and unfulfilling for him, except for the summer.  His time as a child in the nonprofit called Lake Valley Camp, changed his life; He attended camp there in 2003 and later was able to work there until 2014 as Art Director. He counts his time at Lake Valley Camp as one of his biggest influences and it also led to one of his long-term goals: to start an organization that specializes in giving back efforts to young artist and creating murals in low income environments to promote community health, pride, and clean neighborhoods, while also trying to fight gentrification of these areas. 
    In 2015, Khari left Milwaukee and enrolled at Austin Peay State University moving his whole life to Tennessee where he received his BFA in studio art. Austin Peay was a large turning point for his artistic practice and helped him find his voice in his own work during the four years he was a student there. But, the biggest change came in summer 2019 at the Chautauqua residency.  That is where his work started to form and become what it is now.  In 7 weeks, Khari made a lot of work and had the open opportunity to really focus on what he wanted most, outside of class room and school limitations, questioning even if  painting or sculpture was the right path to take. Eventually, Khari was able to find what he was looking for and currently he is at Columbia University. Although Khari has a lot of different ideas, what's most important to him is being a good person, donating what he can, and focusing on the actual work. There is nothing more Khari  loves than creating.
    SHOUT OUTS: 
    Kevin Claiborne
     
    SPONSORS:
    Sunlight Tax Free Masterclass “The Key to More Tax Deductions 
    (for Creators)” 
    LINKS: 
    https://khariturner.com/about
    https://www.instagram.com/khari.raheem/
    I Like Your Work Links:
    Submit Your Work
    Check out our Catalogs!
    Exhibitions
    Studio Visit Artist Interviews
    I Like Your Work Podcast
    Say “hi” on Instagram

    • 46 min
    An Artist's Journey from Money Shame to Accounting Magic

    An Artist's Journey from Money Shame to Accounting Magic

    Hannah Cole is an artist based in Asheville, NC and the owner of Sunlight Tax. She also runs Money Bootcamp, a yearlong membership program to get artists from financial chaos to financial control, so you can get back to your studio.

     
     

    In this mini episode, Hannah joins us to talk about her journey as a painter who had miserable experiences with accountants when she was just starting out. So how did she decide to become one? Hannah shares the origin story of Sunlight Tax and talks about how the magic and love of the artist community was the right motivation to build a business that serves artists with the tax education they need.
     

     

    Visit www.sunlighttax.com/moneybootcamp and use the code ILYWMONEYSQUAD to get exclusive access to the free community I Like Your Work Money Squad. The I Like Your Work Money Squad is only available to listeners when they join Money Bootcamp and is a free support group for artists that includes monthly emails and a private Slack channel that will help keep you motivated and accountable.

     

    • 16 min
    Amir Fallah: Investigating Representation in the History of Western Art

    Amir Fallah: Investigating Representation in the History of Western Art

    Internationally recognized artist Amir H. Fallah is known for his vibrant figurative work that draws from western painting vocabulary and turns the history of portraiture on its head. The work explores how one reconstructs identity and asks the question, how do you describe someone without showing their physical likeness? It’s incredibly powerful work that is also personal. In this interview, Amir talks about his background, how he began creating his current work, and his recent public pieces that were unveiled in California. 
     
    Amir H. Fallah received his BFA in Fine Art & Painting at the Maryland Institute College of Art and his MFA in painting at the University of California, Los Angeles. He has exhibited extensively in solo and group exhibitions across the United States and abroad. Selected solo exhibitions include the Museum of Contemporary Art in Tucson; South Dakota Art Museum, Brookings SD; Schneider Museum of Art, Ashland OR; San Diego Art Institute; and the Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art, Overland KS.
     
    In 2009, the artist was chosen to participate in the 9th Sharjah Biennial. In 2015, Fallah received the Joan Mitchell Foundation Painters and Sculptors Grant. In 2019, Fallah’s painting Calling On The Past received the Northern Trust Purchase Prize at EXPO Chicago. In 2020, Fallah was awarded the COLA Individual Artist Fellowship and the Artadia grant. In addition, the artist had a solo exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Tucson, accompanied by a catalogue, and a year long installation at the ICA San Jose.
     
    The artist is in the permanent collection of the Jorge M. Pérez Collection, Miami; McEvoy Foundation For The Arts, San Francisco; Nerman Museum, Kansas City; SMART Museum of Art at the University of Chicago; Davis Museum, Massachusetts; The Microsoft Collection, Washington; Plattsburgh State Art Museum, NY; Cerritos College Public Art Collection, CA; and Salsali Private Museum, Dubai, UAE. 
     
    Amir H. Fallah creates paintings, murals, and installations that explore systems of representation embedded in the history of Western art. His ornate environments combine visual vocabularies of painting and collage to deconstruct traditional notions of identity formation, while simultaneously defying expectations of the genre for portraiture by removing or obscuring the central figure. In Fallah’s works, the absence of the sitter’s likeness is substituted with a wider representation of their personhood—one that spans time and cultures and is articulated through a network of symbols and imagery. Fallah’s paintings question not only the historical role of portraiture, but the cultural systems that are used to identify one person from another. 
     
    When autobiographical, Fallah’s paintings employ a lexicon of symbols that amalgamate personal narratives with historical and contemporary parables. The paintings serve as a diary of lessons, warnings, and ideals providing coded insight into the formation of an identity, while investigating cultural values often passed between generations. When non-autobiographical, portraits of veiled subjects capitalize on ambiguity to skillfully weave fact and fiction, while questioning how to create a portrait without representing the physicality of the sitter. Although the stories that surround his subjects are deeply personal and are told through the intimate possessions they hold most dear, this work addresses generational immigrant experiences of movement, trauma, and celebration. 
     
    Fallah wryly incorporates Western art historical references into paintings formally rooted in the pattern-based visual language of art historical works from the Middle East. In doing so, his paintings possess a hybridity that reflects his own background as an Iranian-American immigrant straddling cultures. As seen in the artist’s tondos—circular paintings origin

    • 54 min
    What Does the Painting Want? Color & Structure in the Work of Painter Mitchell Johnson

    What Does the Painting Want? Color & Structure in the Work of Painter Mitchell Johnson

    Johnson’s work draws on a vastness of experience and a persistent desire to make paintings that explain the world through color and shape. He has always moved seamlessly between abstraction and representation and the art historian Peter Selz described Johnson as an artist who makes “realist paintings that are basically abstract paintings and abstract paintings that are figurative.”
     
    Mitchell Johnson moved to California from New York City in 1990 to work for the artist, Sam Francis. In New York, Johnson studied at Parsons School of Design with former students of Hans Hofmann: Jane Freilicher, Leland Bell, Nell Blaine, Paul Resika, Larry Rivers and Robert De Niro, Sr. Johnson adopted their reverence for art history and their emphasis on drawing and painting from life as the source of a personal direction.
     
    Beginning in the 1990s Johnson embarked on long painting expeditions to Italy, France and New Mexico with rolls of canvas packed in a golf bag like a modern day Corot. Wading through unfamiliar landscapes, often on foot, he worked to understand the ever complex geometry of land and sky. He prevailed not to capture some ideal sense of place, but to see better and to go deeper into painting.
      
    Johnson has been a visiting artist at The American Academy in Rome, Borgo Finocchieto, The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation and Castle Hill in Truro, MA. In addition to attending Parsons, Johnson studied painting and drawing at Staten Island Academy, Randolph-Macon College, The Washington Studio School, The Santa Fe Institute of Fine Arts and The New York Studio School. His paintings are in the permanent collections of 29 museums and over 700 private collections. Johnson is the subject of three monographs: Mitchell Johnson (2004, Terrence Rogers Fine art), Doppio Binario (2007, Musei Senesi) and Color as Content (2014 Bakersfield Museum of Art). A fourth monograph, Where The Colors Are, will be published in summer 2021.

    Johnson's paintings have appeared in numerous feature films, mostly Nancy Meyers projects, including The Holiday (2006), Crazy Stupid Love (2011), and It's Complicated (2009).
     
     
     
    TAKEAWAYS FROM THIS EPISODE:
     
    -current exhibition at Pamela Walsh 
    -the large paintings did not happen overnight, it took time to cultivate
    -Working with people from 9th Street Women
    -Working with Leland Bell
    - Introduced to the questions he would spend his career working on
    -Working for Frank Stella & Sol LeWitt
    -Traveling through Italy and France
    -Digital Photography
    -Color
    -Smaller paintings and bigger paintings are different problems
    -”What does the painting want?”
    -Freedom
    - Abstraction and Representation
    -”Make the painting feel special”
    -Keep enjoying the struggle
    -curious about transformation
    -On some level the paintings must sustain you on an emotional level 
     
    LINKS: 
    https://www.mitchelljohnson.com/
    https://pamelawalshgallery.com/artists/mitchell-johnson/artworks/striped-chair-sideways
    https://www.artforum.com/spotlight/mitchell-johnson-85170
     
    I Like Your Work Links:
     
    Exhibitions
    Studio Visit Artists
    I Like Your Work Podcast
    Instagram
    Submit Work
    Observations on Applying to Juried Shows
    Studio Planner

    • 50 min
    Room For Mistakes: Artist Matt Bollinger

    Room For Mistakes: Artist Matt Bollinger

    Matt Bollinger is an artist living in Ithaca, NY who works across painting, animation, sculpture and music. Bollinger earned his BFA at the Kansas City Art Institute in 2003 and his MFA at the Rhode Island School of Design in 2007. He has had 6 solo exhibitions at Zürcher Gallery, New York and 3 solo exhibitions at Galerie Zürcher, Paris. His animations have been included in numerous film festivals and screenings in the US and Europe. His work is in the collections of the Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art (Kansas City, MO), Museum of Fine Arts (Dole, France), and the Bowdoin College Museum of Art (Brunswick, ME) Recent solo exhibitions include Extended Present, at the South Bend Museum of Art (South Bend, IN) and Labor Day at M+B (Los Angeles, LA). In 2020, Zürcher Gallery participated in the Armory Show for the first time with a duo-presentation of Staver and Matt Bollinger in the Focus Section, curated by Jamillah James.
     
    TAKEAWAYS FROM THIS EPISODE:
     
    -Everything comes from drawing
    -Base idea for work coming from a sentence
    -Creating character sheets for different paintings
    -Researching his work
    -Vulnerability and empathy of the characters
    - The primary direction of light
    -Think in tone
    -Always looking
    -Making the soundtrack for his animations
    -How much sound impacts the work
    -Drawing with sound
    - Never being shy about talking about his work
    -Kerry James Marshall
    - Remove process hurdles
    - How COVID impacted his practice
    - Finding ways for freedom 
     
    LINKS: 
    https://www.mattbollinger.com/

    https://www.instagram.com/mattlbollinger/?hl=en


     
    I Like Your Work Links:
     
    I Like Your Work Podcast
    Studio Planner
    Instagram
    Submit Work
    Observations on Applying to Juried Shows

    • 54 min
    Keeping Your Eye on the Long Game: Artist Dana Frankfort

    Keeping Your Eye on the Long Game: Artist Dana Frankfort

    Dana Frankfort’s paintings engage the history of abstract painting and feature bright colors, gestural brushwork, and text. She earned a BA in the History of Art from Brandeis University and an MFA in Painting and Printmaking from Yale University School of Art. She attended Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, and was a Core Fellow at the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, Texas. She received a Guggenheim Fellowship in Painting in 2006. Frankfort’s work has been shown in solo and group exhibitions internationally. She currently lives in Houston, Texas where she is an Assistant Professor of Painting at the University of Houston.
     
    TAKEAWAYS FROM THIS EPISODE:
     
    -Working with amazing faculty
    -British landscape painting as an influence
    -Taking a break from painting
    -The importance of text in her work
    -Painting as a sign or billboard
    -Painting as a long game
    -There isn’t one way to be an artist
    -The painting will be there
    -Color influxes
    -Accessibility of language
    -”Paint what I know”
    - We create our own opportunities
    -Investing back into the community
     
     
    LINKS:
    https://www.uh.edu/kgmca/art/about-the-school/faculty/
    https://www.instagram.com/dmfrankfort/
    I Like Your Work Links:
     
    I Like Your Work Podcast
    Studio Planner
    Instagram
    Submit Work
    Observations on Applying to Juried Shows

    • 34 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
150 Ratings

150 Ratings

breadhead's daughter ,

Great balance of topics

Erika’s layered conversations with artists are full of studio love. She has a gift for getting guests to expand on their ideas in a clear and accessible way for the listener. The podcast also offers inspiration and practical tools for artists to communicate their own work more effectively.

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Katie Davis

I love this podcast and only wish I had this feeling of community and inspiration ten years ago! Thank you, Erika! You are doing great work.

Lara's Art ,

Erika, I like your work!

Great listining! I enjoy getting to know more artists while I paint. It is a great community.

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