15 episodes

Maybe you've read the final story, but have you ever wondered what the reporters did behind the scenes? We sit down with journalists from around the world to shine a light on the projects and initiatives they're involved with, new technologies and skills they may be utilizing, and challenges they’ve both confronted in the past, and continue to navigate today. Tune in to IJNotes, the premiere podcast from the International Journalists' Network (IJNet), a project of the International Center for Journalists.

IJNotes: An IJNet podcast IJNet

    • News
    • 5.0 • 12 Ratings

Maybe you've read the final story, but have you ever wondered what the reporters did behind the scenes? We sit down with journalists from around the world to shine a light on the projects and initiatives they're involved with, new technologies and skills they may be utilizing, and challenges they’ve both confronted in the past, and continue to navigate today. Tune in to IJNotes, the premiere podcast from the International Journalists' Network (IJNet), a project of the International Center for Journalists.

    Environmental Journalism, Part 4: Global crisis, local perspectives

    Environmental Journalism, Part 4: Global crisis, local perspectives

    No two communities will experience the effects of climate change in the same way. As the climate crisis worsens, the need for comprehensive, educational and sometimes life-saving news coverage increases. 
    While national and international media play an important role in covering the crisis, local outlets may be better able to understand how their communities view and bear its consequences, and what solutions are best for them. 
    In addition to an in-depth understanding of their local audience, local outlets benefit from more public trust than national ones. In a world where only 54% of the global population expresses “a lot” or a “great deal” of trust in what scientists say about the environment, that trust in local media is an important advantage in the ability to educate people about the climate crisis. 
    What exactly can local journalism bring to the way the climate crisis is covered? Why are local sources so important in producing engaging stories about the environment? And what can national journalists learn from local climate reporters?
    In our newest IJNotes episode, we spoke with Tristan Baurick, an environment reporter for The Times-Picayune, a New Orleans-based newspaper. Baurick’s work focuses on coastal restoration, fisheries and the oil industry. He won the Society of Environmental Journalists’ prestigious Pulliam Award in 2020.
    Baurick discusses why covering the environment from a local perspective is so critical, and how interviewing local sources can generate important impact. He also provides tips on how to report the climate crisis from different angles, and how to make climate change stories more engaging. 
    Support the show (https://www.icfj.org/donate-ijnet-project-icfj)

    • 15 min
    Environmental Journalism, Part 3: Covering major climate events

    Environmental Journalism, Part 3: Covering major climate events

    Extreme weather events and natural disasters have ravaged many communities around the globe, and their devastating consequences seem only to be intensifying. This past year alone, the world witnessed record droughts in the U.S. and Latin America, while China and Europe suffered fatal floods. Hurricanes, tornadoes and wildfires also dominated headlines due to the significant destruction they’ve caused.
    Are these events all related to climate change? How should reporters explain the connection between extreme weather and rising temperatures? How can they approach the coverage of these emergencies without being sensationalist? 
    For the third episode in our Environmental Journalism series, we spoke with multimedia journalist Tais Gadea Lara from Argentina. “These events depend on some factors — and some of these factors have been changing because of climate change,” she explained. 
    In the episode, Gadea Lara provides her expert advice on the main aspects of covering extreme climate events. “It’s a challenge,” she said, to cover these situations, but for her it’s also “the best opportunity” journalists have to report on the causes and consequences of climate change. 
    She also stressed the importance of choosing the right words. “If we talk about natural disasters or environmental disasters, maybe the audience thinks that it’s something on which humans [don’t] have any responsibilities,” she said. “If we talk about climate events, then it’s something that [is starting] to be related to climate and we are changing the climate — so maybe we have a little or more responsibility on that.”
    Support the show (https://www.icfj.org/donate-ijnet-project-icfj)

    • 17 min
    Environmental Journalism, Part 2: The keys to environmental justice reporting

    Environmental Journalism, Part 2: The keys to environmental justice reporting

    The climate crisis doesn’t affect everyone equally. As more journalists report on environmental issues, it’s critical that they shine a light on the heightened consequences our deteriorating environment has on vulnerable communities. 
    Environmental justice reporters do just this.
    Although the environmental justice movement began more than 30 years ago, many newsrooms are only just beginning to report on the intersection of discrimination and the environment, and how structural inequities intensify the consequences of the climate crisis. Environmental racism, for instance, affects the daily lives of many globally. 
    In our newest IJNotes episode, I spoke with Yessenia Funes, the climate director at Atmos, a climate and culture magazine and digital platform. Funes has worked as an environmental justice reporter for seven years, including at outlets like Colorlines and Gizmodo. 
    During our discussion, Funes provides insight on what exactly environmental justice reporting is, how she carries out her coverage, and why the beat is so critical for helping us understand the full scope of the climate crisis. She also highlights her favorite environmental justice stories that she has produced, and the challenges she faces as a reporter working this beat. 
    Support the show (https://www.icfj.org/donate-ijnet-project-icfj)

    • 15 min
    Environmental Journalism, Part 1: Are we all climate reporters now?

    Environmental Journalism, Part 1: Are we all climate reporters now?

    Today, from flooding and wildfires, to droughts, heat waves and hurricanes of increasing intensity and frequency, we’re experiencing these repercussions, and experts agree they’ll only get worse. 
    In the coming years, more journalists than ever will be needed to report on our deteriorating environment. They’ll be tasked with covering the crisis and its fallout from all angles — and as comprehensively as they’ve reported on the COVID-19 pandemic.
    This is why we’ve decided to focus on environmental reporting for our new IJNotes podcast series. To kick off the series, I spoke with journalist Sebastián Rodriguez, who today is the editor in chief of Climate Tracker, an international nonprofit that supports and trains environmental reporters around the world. He previously was an editor for Ojo al Clima, the first climate news site in Central America.
    In this first episode, Rodriguez discusses how he approaches the climate beat, and why the increasingly dire global climate crisis requires that journalists collaborate to cover it effectively. He shares advice for fellow journalists reporting on the environment, and discusses what environmental issues are top of mind for his audience in Costa Rica.
    Support the show (https://www.icfj.org/donate-ijnet-project-icfj)

    • 21 min
    Mental health and journalism, Part 6: A conversation with Mar Cabra

    Mental health and journalism, Part 6: A conversation with Mar Cabra

    You may have heard about the groundbreaking Panama Papers investigation, which exposed how some of the most rich and powerful people around the world used offshore tax havens to conceal their wealth.
    Former journalist Mar Cabra played a critical role during the groundbreaking investigation, as the head of the data and research unit at the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ), the organization that spearheaded the global collaborative effort. She and her colleagues won a Pulitzer Prize for their reporting. 
    The work, however, led Cabra to begin feeling the effects of burnout. A year after the Panama Papers investigation was published, she decided to leave her role at ICIJ to focus more on her own mental well-being. Today, she leads efforts to raise awareness of critical, under-recognized mental health issues with other journalists in today’s fast-paced news industry.

    Earlier this year, for instance, Cabra helped launch The Self-Investigation, a free online stress management program for journalists.
    In the sixth and final episode of our Mental Health and Journalism series, Cabra shares with us her personal story, insights on what a health relationship with technology looks like, and how journalists can better manage issues like stress and burnout that threaten their well-being.
    Support the show (https://www.icfj.org/donate-ijnet-project-icfj)

    • 26 min
    Mental health and journalism, Part 5: A conversation with Hannah Storm

    Mental health and journalism, Part 5: A conversation with Hannah Storm

    This summer, accomplished journalist and media consultant Hannah Storm published a personal story about her diagnosis with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). 
    The PTSD was a result of many traumas over the years, Storm wrote: it stemmed from experiences she had when reporting internationally on crises and disasters, and sexual assaults she survived when she was a young reporter. All were in some way related to her job.
    While today more and more journalists, news organizations and media nonprofits begin to shine a light on the pervasiveness of violence against women journalists, there is still little discussion on how this has an impact on their mental health. 
    In our discussion, Storm helps us bridge that gap. She discusses her  personal experience dealing with mental health issues, and offers expertise she gained while serving as the director of the International News Safety Institute, and the director and CEO of the Ethical Journalism Network, a role she holds today. 
    Our conversation is candid, personal and full of great advice for journalists, editors and newsroom managers.
    Resources mentioned in the episode:
    ICFJ/UNESCO survey on online harassment of women journalistsDart Center for Journalism and TraumaTrollBustersIJNotes mental health and journalism podcast seriesIJNet resourcesManaging stress and digital overload as a journalistNews and mental health: What journalists should knowMental health tips and resources for journalistsMental and physical health of reporters during COVID-19Key quotes: Self-care on the frontline with Elaine MonaghanSupport the show (https://www.icfj.org/donate-ijnet-project-icfj)

    • 39 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
12 Ratings

12 Ratings

Zainab Imam ,

Takes you behind the scenes

It’s always great to hear from journalists in a “how I did it” way. Great podcast! Looking forward to future episodes.

wapofanatic ,

Such fun guests

This podcast is always one of the best to listen to because of how interesting the guests always are. Great job!

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