14 episodes

Light and lively discussions on film, music, and creative culture.

I'll Follow You Allison Felus

    • Performing Arts

Light and lively discussions on film, music, and creative culture.

    013 “A Nice Way to Think About One’s Relationship with Time and Objects”–A Chat About Perfume with Shiamin Kwa

    013 “A Nice Way to Think About One’s Relationship with Time and Objects”–A Chat About Perfume with Shiamin Kwa

    Visit QueenofPeaches.com for show notes!

    Welcome to the perfume episode!

    Today I’m in conversation with my dear and brilliant friend Shiamin Kwa.

    Shiamin is Associate Professor of East Asian Languages and Cultures  and Comparative Literature at Bryn Mawr College. She is the author of  three books, the most recent being Regarding Frames: Thinking with Comics in the Twenty-first Century,  which was just released by RIT Press in February of this year. Her  written work explores relationships between form and content, text and  image, self and self-presentation, surface and depth, and the conflicts  between what we say and what we mean. Her research interests include  theater and fiction, food studies, graphic narratives, literary studies,  cultural studies, comparative and world literature, and literary and  narrative theory.

    She also contributed an amazingly funny and tender essay about the band Wham! to my most recent zine The Last Band of My Youth.

    In today’s deep dive on perfume, we talk about how smells can seem so  much richer in our memories when we don’t have access to them anymore,  the quiet spaciousness of perfume as object, how we’re meant to interact  with perfume on a time scale, how wearing Frederic Malle’s “Portrait of  a Lady” is like having to do self-promotion as the author of a new  book, and the difficulty of imposing order on things you love.

    • 1 hr 9 min
    012 "The Guiding Light Is Surprise"--A Chat with Tony Trigilio

    012 "The Guiding Light Is Surprise"--A Chat with Tony Trigilio

    Visit queenofpeaches.com for show notes! 

    Today, I’m incredibly pleased to be speaking with my friend, neighbor, and former bandmate, the poet Tony Trigilio.

    Tony is the author and editor of 13 books, including, most recently, Ghosts of the Upper Floor (published by BlazeVOX [books] in 2019), which is the third installment in his multivolume poem, The Complete Dark Shadows (of My Childhood). His selected poems, Fuera del Taller del Cosmos, was published in Guatemala by Editorial Poe (translated by Bony Hernández). He is editor of Elise Cowen: Poems and Fragments (published by Ahsahta Press in 2014), and the author of Allen Ginsberg’s Buddhist Poetics (published by Southern Illinois University Press in 2012). Tony coedits the poetry journal Court Green and is an associate editor for Tupelo Quarterly. He is a Professor of English and Creative Writing at Columbia College Chicago.

    Today we discuss his origin story as a poet, the possibilities that  get unlocked by asking a student “tell me more of what you mean by  that,” building bridges between the hemispheres of the brain, how  playing drums professionally helped Tony unite his practice as a writer  with his work as a scholar, and why the best art feels like a friend  saying to you, “I’m going to tell you something but it’s hard to say.”

    For more information about Tony, you can find him online at starve.org.

    • 1 hr 11 min
    011 "I Don't Want to Be an Expert"–A Chat with Keiler Roberts

    011 "I Don't Want to Be an Expert"–A Chat with Keiler Roberts

    Visit queenofpeaches.com for show notes!

    Keiler Roberts has been writing autobiographical comics for ten years.  Her six books include Sunburning, Chlorine Gardens, and, most recently,  Rat Time, all three of which were published by Koyama Press. Her  self-published autobiographical comic series Powdered Milk received an  Ignatz Award for Outstanding Series in 2016, and in 2019 Chlorine Gardens received Slate's Cartoonist Studio Prize for Best Print Comic of  2018, which was selected by The Slate Book Review and The Center for  Cartoon Studies. Her work has been included in The Best American Comics in 2016 and 2018 and was mentioned on their Notables list for 2014. She  has taught at the School of the Art Institute in Chicago since 2013 and  lives in Evanston, Illinois, with her husband, the artist Scott Roberts,  their daughter Xia, and perhaps the most famous cartoon pet since  Snoopy, their dog Crooky.

    • 1 hr 5 min
    010 “I Would Always Say Yes to a Spiritual Experience”–A Chat with Angie Yingst

    010 “I Would Always Say Yes to a Spiritual Experience”–A Chat with Angie Yingst

    Visit QueenofPeaches.com for show notes!

    Today on the show I’m incredibly pleased to be in conversation with Angie Yingst.

    Angie is a published writer, a sacred artist, a Usui Reiki Master Teacher, and an Earth Medicine Practitioner specializing in shamanic and crystal healing techniques.

    Angie has been reading Tarot for thirty years and is a member of the American Tarot Association. She has also trained through the Hibiscus Moon Crystal Academy as a Certified Crystal Healer and an Advanced Crystal Master, and she now serves the school and its community as Curriculum Specialist and Crystal Coach. Angie has also been studying since 2012 with Pixie Lighthorse and has completed all four levels of her training through SouLodge Earth Medicine School.

    Angie offers both in-person and distance one-on-one healing sessions that combine crystal healing, shamanic healing, Reiki, drum and rattle, breathwork, and plant medicine to facilitate healing in her clients, balancing her work with the moon cycles and seasonal energies to maximize healing potential. Angie teaches tarot, crystals and crystal healing, shamanic work, psychic development and intuitive work, creative and art workshops, and offers group healing sessions through the Alta View Wellness Center in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.

    Today we dig deep to talk about grief, addiction, perfectionism, and the dangers of spiritual bypassing, as well as the difference between being a guru and an effective space-holder.

    • 1 hr 14 min
    009 "Luckily Theater Saved Me"--A Chat with Paul Storiale

    009 "Luckily Theater Saved Me"--A Chat with Paul Storiale

    Click here for show notes!

    This week on the show, I’m delighted to be speaking with a very dear friend, the theatrical impresario and President of NoHo himself, Mr. Paul Storiale.

    Paul is the Artistic Director for the Defiance Theatre Company, the President and Founder of the Valley Theatre Awards in Los Angeles, and creator of the award-winning stage play The Columbine Project. He’s also the creator of the web series Gossip Boy, which you can stream on Amazon Prime, and a successful comedic actor in his own right, having performed for many years in the dinner theater phenomenon Tony n’ Tina’s Wedding and having recently toured the country as part of the cast of My Big Gay Italian Wedding.

    And if that’s not enough of a full plate, Paul is also a Los Angeles elected public official, currently serving as president of the NoHo Neighborhood Council, an advisory board created by the Los Angeles City Charter to provide improved access to government and make government more responsive to local needs in the North Hollywood community.

    Today we chat about how to create a little bit of healthy antagonism among your cast during rehearsals, establishing a container for catharsis in a live theater space, and the secret of never having to audition as an actor ever again.

    • 1 hr 6 min
    008 "Everything Is Interdisciplinary"--A Chat with David Higgins

    008 "Everything Is Interdisciplinary"--A Chat with David Higgins

    Click here for show notes!

    Today I’m pleased to have on the show one of my all-time favorite humans, David Higgins.

    David teaches English at Inver Hills Community College in Minnesota. He is a specialist in 20th-century American literature and culture, and his research explores transformations in imperial fantasy during the Cold War period and beyond. His article “Toward a Cosmopolitan Science Fiction” won the 2012 Science Fiction Research Association’s Pioneer Award for excellence in scholarship. He has published in journals such as American Literature, Science Fiction Studies, Science Fiction Film and Television, and Extrapolation, and his work has appeared in edited volumes such as The Cambridge Companion to American Science Fiction.

    He is also the Speculative Fiction Editor for the Los Angeles Review of Books.

    In our chat today, we talk about his upcoming book on reverse colonization narratives in the science fiction of the 1960s, how he’s calibrated his own best creative routines, why he congratulates his undergraduate students when they feel like they’ve failed, and the many flexible ways to approach the study and criticism of speculative fiction.

    • 1 hr 10 min

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