10 episodes

The ID The Future (IDTF) podcast carries on Discovery Institute's mission of exploring the issues central to evolution and intelligent design. IDTF is a short podcast providing you with the most current news and views on evolution and ID. IDTF delivers brief interviews with key scientists and scholars developing the theory of ID, as well as insightful commentary from Discovery Institute senior fellows and staff on the scientific, educational and legal aspects of the debate.

Intelligent Design the Future Discovery Institute

    • Life Sciences
    • 4.2 • 548 Ratings

The ID The Future (IDTF) podcast carries on Discovery Institute's mission of exploring the issues central to evolution and intelligent design. IDTF is a short podcast providing you with the most current news and views on evolution and ID. IDTF delivers brief interviews with key scientists and scholars developing the theory of ID, as well as insightful commentary from Discovery Institute senior fellows and staff on the scientific, educational and legal aspects of the debate.

    Casey Luskin’s South Africa Adventures

    Casey Luskin’s South Africa Adventures

    On this ID the Future, Rob Crowther interviews geologist Casey Luskin, recently back from getting his PhD in geology at the University of Johannesburg in South Africa. Luskin, who formerly worked for Discovery Institute’s Center for Science and Culture, and has just now rejoined the CSC, tells about his adventures doing field research in Africa, his side interest in human origins, his cross-cultural experiences, the amazing game parks, museums, and fossil sites he visited, and a little bit about his PhD, including some evidence suggesting that parts of Africa and Western Australia used to be connected.
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    • 21 min
    No, Scientists Should Not Rule

    No, Scientists Should Not Rule

    On this new episode of ID the Future, The Price of Panic co-author and philosopher Jay Richards hosts bioethicist Wesley J. Smith to discuss a Tweet from Physics-Astronomy.org. The Tweet read, “Imagine a world ruled by scientists, not politicians.” The drift of the Tweet was, wouldn’t rule by scientists be wonderful! Smith immediately threw up a great big “Don’t go there” sign at the Epoch Times. As  Smith and Richards emphasize, such an approach to governance would be disastrous, and would actually be anti-science. It would tend to corrupt the practice of science, thrust scientific specialists into positions calling for generalist skills, and further the arrogant mistake that is scientism—the view not only that nature is all there is, but Read More ›
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    • 19 min
    Algorithmic Specified Complexity Pt. 3: Measuring Mt. Rushmore

    Algorithmic Specified Complexity Pt. 3: Measuring Mt. Rushmore

    On this ID The Future from the vault, Robert J. Marks and Winston Ewert, both of the Evolutionary Informatics Lab, continue their conversation about three of their recently published papers dealing with evolution, biological information, and what is known as algorithmic specified complexity. In this final podcast of the series, Dr. Ewert explains the role of context in measuring meaning in images. A non-humanoid gelatinous alien might assign no meaning to the faces on Mount Rushmore if the alien had never seen a humanoid. But humans, and especially humans familiar with major figures in American history, have the context to recognize that the carved shapes tightly match pre-existing patterns and therefore contain considerable algorithmic specified complexity. Ewert then applies all Read More ›
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    • 20 min
    A Mousetrap for Darwin, and Another for Richard Lenski

    A Mousetrap for Darwin, and Another for Richard Lenski

    Today’s ID the Future extends the discussion of A Mousetrap for Darwin: Michael Behe Answers His Critics, the newest book from Discovery Institute Press. Here the focus is on Parts 4 and 7 of the new book, and in particular Richard Lenski’s Long Term Evolution Experiment at Michigan State. What has this long-running project demonstrated? As Behe explains in the book (and elaborates on in today’s podcast), “The study has addressed some narrow points of peculiar interest to evolutionary population geneticists, but for proponents of intelligent design the bottom line is that the great majority of even beneficial mutations have turned out to be due to the breaking, degrading, or minor tweaking of pre-existing genes or regulatory regions. There have Read More ›
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    • 28 min
    Algorithmic Specified Complexity Pt. 2: Conway’s Game of Life

    Algorithmic Specified Complexity Pt. 2: Conway’s Game of Life

    On this ID The Future from the vault, Robert J. Marks and Winston Ewert, both of the Evolutionary Informatics Lab, discuss John Conway’s Game of Life, played on a rectangular grid. In the game, cells live or die depending on the cells that surround them. Hobbyists have designed highly complex patterns using Conway’s four simple rules of birth, death and survival. Patterns include oscillators, spaceships and glider guns. Ewert explains how the theory of algorithmic specified complexity can be applied to the game and to exploring design questions. The discussion centers around a peer-reviewed journal article by Ewert, Marks, and William Dembski: “Algorithmic Specified Complexity in the Game of Life.”
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    • 13 min
    How to Destroy Love with Darwinism

    How to Destroy Love with Darwinism

    On today’s ID the Future, host Andrew McDiarmid presents an Evolution News essay, “How to Destroy Love with Darwinism.” Altruism as defined by evolutionists means “behavior by an animal that may be to its disadvantage but that benefits others of its kind.” It’s not an easy fit with Darwinism, since Darwinian evolution is all about passing your favored genes onto your offspring. How can a creature do that if she gives her life for another, particularly when it’s not even her own children, and before she has produced any offspring? Such individuals fail to pass on their own genes — a seeming conundrum for Darwinism. Evolutionists have made some progress (they think) explaining such things with theories of group selection Read More ›
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    • 12 min

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5
548 Ratings

548 Ratings

I use it for sports ,

This isn’t a religious podcast. Pure science!

Excellent minds on this show. Intelligent Design (ID) is growing, and for good reason. I’m happy to see it reaching more people. And no, scripture is never quoted in these podcasts (I’m sure that people who are hostile toward ID will say that this is a Bible podcast).

DannHag ,

Priceless

Where else can you find engaging presentations on ID by the experts themselves! It’s a must for the science enthusiast. I get smarter each show I listen to!

11 names ,

Thank goodness!

I appreciate the varied expert guests who are continuing to think through the evidences and implications of Design Theory. I’m glad I found this podcast.

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