44 episodes

The Irregular Warfare Podcast explores an important component of war throughout history. Small wars, drone strikes, special operations forces, counterterrorism, proxies—this podcast covers the full range of topics related to irregular war and features in-depth conversations with guests from the military, academia, and the policy community. The podcast is a collaboration between the Modern War Institute at West Point and Princeton's Empirical Studies of Conflict Project.

Irregular Warfare Podcast Modern War Institute at West Point

    • News
    • 4.8 • 208 Ratings

The Irregular Warfare Podcast explores an important component of war throughout history. Small wars, drone strikes, special operations forces, counterterrorism, proxies—this podcast covers the full range of topics related to irregular war and features in-depth conversations with guests from the military, academia, and the policy community. The podcast is a collaboration between the Modern War Institute at West Point and Princeton's Empirical Studies of Conflict Project.

    Anytime, Anyplace: Air Force Special Operations Command in Future Irregular Warfare

    Anytime, Anyplace: Air Force Special Operations Command in Future Irregular Warfare

    Irregular warfare is executed across all domains. In the air, the responsibility for IW falls to Air Force Special Operations Command. Today, the command stands at an inflection point in which it must prepare to compete against great powers while continuing the fight against violent extremist organizations. How must AFSOC change in order to meet divergent demands for specialized airpower? This episode featured a conversation with two guests who address that question: Lt. Gen. James C. Slife, commander of AFSOC, and Dr. Richard Norton, a retired Air Force officer and adjunct professor at the Joint Special Operations University.
    Intro music: "Unsilenced" by Ketsa
    Outro music: "Launch" by Ketsa
    CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

    • 39 min
    Two Sides of the COIN: Good Governance vs. Compellence

    Two Sides of the COIN: Good Governance vs. Compellence

    In counterinsurgency warfare, how can powerful states reform corrupt or repressive governments into legitimate ones? Our guests on this episode, Jacqueline L. Hazelton and Anne-Marie Slaughter, discuss this fundamental challenge and explain two competing models of counterinsurgency that take different approaches to it. The first is the good governance model, which has dominated both scholarship and COIN practice over recent decades. But the second, the compellence model, might actually better explain COIN success in the past. The discussion concludes with a reflection on both the opportunities and the limits of US power in potential future interventions.
    Intro music: "Unsilenced" by Ketsa
    Outro music: "Launch" by Ketsa
    CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

    • 44 min
    The Future of Coalition Building and Irregular Warfare

    The Future of Coalition Building and Irregular Warfare

    In the aftermath of the military withdrawal from Afghanistan and the country's chaotic collapse, it is easy to forget the prominent role that the United States played in building, leading, and sustaining a forty-nation coalition for the war effort—a task that required some determined diplomacy and a sophisticated understanding of what each country brought to the table. As the United States pivots to the Indo-Pacific region and the competition with China for legitimacy and influence below the level of armed conflict, the question becomes whether coalition building is the right approach for new challenges and a new strategic environment. Retired US Army Lieutenant General Douglas Lute and retired Australian Army Major General Duncan Lewis both have deep experience working with coalitions, both as senior officers and in diplomatic roles. They join this episode to share their experiences and lessons for the future.

    • 55 min
    Learning from the Past, Anticipating the Future: Organizational Change in Irregular Warfare

    Learning from the Past, Anticipating the Future: Organizational Change in Irregular Warfare

    hroughout history, IW organizations have undergone dramatic changes at all levels to meet the demands of new operating environments and threats. The book The Changing of the Guard: The British Army since 9/11 explores the difficulties the British Army faced trying to reorganize for irregular warfare in Iraq and Afghanistan. Simon Akam, the book's author, is one of our guests on this episode, and he provides listeners with lessons learned and key takeaways from the British experience that can guide ongoing organizational changes. Our other guest is retired General John Allen, who draws on his decades of experience at the highest levels of military leadership and policy, giving his perspective on how IW organizations can successfully meet the needs of strategic competition.
    Intro music: "Unsilenced" by Ketsa
    Outro music: "Launch" by Ketsa
    CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

    • 40 min
    Cyberspace as a Battlespace: Irregular Warfare through Bits and Bytes

    Cyberspace as a Battlespace: Irregular Warfare through Bits and Bytes

    What is the intersection between cyber and irregular warfare? Should the United States consider cyberspace a typical or exquisite domain? How did the counterterrorism fight serve as a proving ground for the application of these emerging capabilities? This episode examines the character of cyber warfare—both in its relationship to irregular warfare and in its applicability to broader national security approaches—and features a conversation with Dr. Jacquelyn Schneider and Admiral Mike Rogers.
    Intro music: "Unsilenced" by Ketsa
    Outro music: "Launch" by Ketsa
    CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

    • 53 min
    Special Operations Forces and Great Power Competition

    Special Operations Forces and Great Power Competition

    Will the role and capabilities required of special operations forces change in a geopolitical context characterized by great power competition? How will SOF balance enduring counterterrorism missions with new requirements to deter great power rivals? This episode examines those questions and more and features a discussion with General Richard Clarke, commander of US Special Operations Command, and Linda Robinson, a leading researcher on special operations forces and author of two books on the subject.
    Intro music: "Unsilenced" by Ketsa
    Outro music: "Launch" by Ketsa
    CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

    • 56 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
208 Ratings

208 Ratings

mrschase1 ,

Great Podcast!!

I love listening to this podcast and it’s ranked as my #1 podcast. I’m always recommending it to my friends and colleagues. The topics discussed are always thought provoking and intriguing. Overall, I would recommend this to anyone.

50H40 ,

Why should we listen to you?

Why should we listen to you when you have been wrong about everything for the past 30 years? All these types of podcasts say the same thing about building alliances, deploy all over the world etc. but we have been doing that for decades and we are worse off today than we were in the 90’s. This is the same old song but you people never get anything right. Why don’t you try something different bc what you have been doing is not working.

thay2034 ,

Fantastic!

Great podcast to stay up to date with security studies and practical experiences with IW

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