79 episodes

Latino USA offers insight into the lived experiences of Latino communities and is a window on the current and merging cultural, political and social ideas impacting Latinos and the nation.

Latino USA PRX

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.9 • 3.3K Ratings

Latino USA offers insight into the lived experiences of Latino communities and is a window on the current and merging cultural, political and social ideas impacting Latinos and the nation.

    By Right Of Discovery

    By Right Of Discovery

    On Thanksgiving Day, hundreds of people gather on Alcatraz Island, the famous former prison and one of the largest tourist attractions in San Francisco, for a sunrise ceremony to honor Indigenous culture and history. In 1969, an intertribal group of students and activists took over the island for over 16 months in an act of political resistance. Richard Oakes, a young Mohawk from New York, was one of the leaders in this movement dubbed the "Red Power Movement." Latino USA tells the story of Richard Oakes' life, from his first involvement in activism to his untimely death at the age of 30.

    This episode originally aired on November, 2018.

    • 48 min
    Kate's Summer

    Kate's Summer

    The summer of 2020 was filled with uncertainty as more than 20 million people in the U.S. were left unemployed — including Kate Bustamante’s parents. Bustamante is a 20-year-old student at Santa Ana College in Santa Ana, California. She’s always worked part-time and attended school as long as she can remember. But this summer was different. Overnight, Bustamante dropped out of classes and became her family’s breadwinner. In this personal piece Bustamante, through diary recordings and personal reflections, takes us into her world and what she went through over the summer.

    • 31 min
    Portrait Of: Gloria Estefan

    Portrait Of: Gloria Estefan

    Gloria Maria Milagrosa Fajardo Garcia was a shy, quiet young woman who joined a band named the Miami Latin Boys. Although she had no plans of international fame, and intended to continue her studies, life had different plans for her. The Miami Latin Boys became The Miami Sound Machine, Emilio and Gloria married, and the newlywed, Gloria Estefan began to take over the spotlight. The rest, is music history. In this Portrait Of: Gloria Estefan, Latino USA sits down with the icon to discuss her life, her relationships, how she overcame trauma, and how she manages to be excited about everything she does.

    • 36 min
    How I Made It: From Foster Kid to Judge

    How I Made It: From Foster Kid to Judge

    When she was nine years-old, Xiomara Torres fled the civil war in her home country of El Salvador and came to the U.S. As a child she adjusted to her new life in East Los Angeles before she was removed from her family and put into foster care—where she spent six years of her life moving from home to home. Now, she's the subject of a local play in Oregon titled, "Judge Torres." In this edition of “How I Made It,” Judge Torres shares how she overcame the hurdles of the foster system and made her way to the Oregon Circuit Court.

    This story originally aired in March of 2019.

    • 14 min
    The Myth Of The 'Latino Vote'

    The Myth Of The 'Latino Vote'

    A major lesson from the 2020 election is one that Latinos already know: The idea of a single “Latino vote” is a myth. Latinos and Latinas throughout the United States draw from different histories that have shaped their different policy interests, ideologies, and personal experiences—and that all inform how they ultimately cast their ballots. President Trump won Florida, including nearly half of all Latinx-identifying voters in the state. But across the country in Arizona, grassroots groups led a wave of younger Latinx voters to flip the state blue for President-elect Joe Biden. In this episode of Latino USA, we take a closer look at the Latino and Latina voters that made it out to the polls in these states and how they decided who to cast their critical votes for.

    • 54 min
    How I Made It: Las Cafeteras

    How I Made It: Las Cafeteras

    Las Cafeteras are a band out of East LA that met while doing community organizing. They began playing at the Eastside Cafe, where they discovered Son Jarocho, traditional Afro-Mexican music from Veracruz. They quickly began to adapt the music to their realities fusing it with hip hop, rock, ska, and spoken word. They are known for their politically charged lyrics, speaking out against injustices within the immigrant community and their experiences as chicanos in East LA. On today’s “How I Made It”, we sat down with members of the group to discuss how they got started, and their work to tell and preserve brown stories.

    • 13 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
3.3K Ratings

3.3K Ratings

Wondering Samurai ,

On point

The content is on point (I just wish Ms. Hinojosa would stop saying “Latino and Latina” and just say a unified, “Latinos.”)

borreguinloro ,

Latino USA

Thank you, this conversations are so incredible touching! And at the same time so educational. So helpful to try to start the healing process! 😢❤️

Pbskidtheone ,

Reclaimers story

Thank you soooooo much for doing this story. It deserves all the attention. It means a lot.

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