5 episodes

You've got real-life, feet on the ground kinds of questions that need answers so you can become the leader you want to be AND develop the next level of leaders around you.

Each episode focuses on questions submitted by listeners just like you. Join in the discussion and get answers in each episode to the questions you've been asking.

Lead Your Leaders Annie Perdue-Olson

    • Business
    • 5.0 • 11 Ratings

You've got real-life, feet on the ground kinds of questions that need answers so you can become the leader you want to be AND develop the next level of leaders around you.

Each episode focuses on questions submitted by listeners just like you. Join in the discussion and get answers in each episode to the questions you've been asking.

    When They Feel Micromanaged

    When They Feel Micromanaged

    "I heard from a team member’s direct report that they feel micromanaged. I probably need to talk to the team member about it, but isn’t it micromanaging if I step in?"
     
    You’re cautious to jump right in and control the situation because you want to lead well. You’re building a team and if you jump in too often it defeats the purpose of having the team you want and need. And you certainly wouldn’t want to talk to your team member about micromanaging others by stepping across the line and actually micromanaging them. 
    WHAT IS MICROMANAGING?
    It's interpersonal. Feeling talked down to. Having abilities questioned. Different communication styles. It could mean they don’t feel empowered to make decisions even on simple things. Or they have to circle back too often. It might mean completed work gets redone or projects are taken over before they're finished.   
    With so much ambiguity about what micromanaging really means, you are right to be cautious to step in and micromanage. 
    CRAFT THE CONVERSATION
    You’ve probably already thought about sending them back to talk to your team member about their experience. More than just sending them back, what about helping them shape the conversation. 
    Ask them some questions that help them bottom line what is important to them.
    “Next time this comes up, I would like to be empowered to make that decision. What would it take to do that?” “When you talk to me about something I’ve done that you don’t like, could you please assume the benefit of the doubt and ask me some questions that allow me the opportunity to explain my thinking.” “Rather than random check-ins, could we get agreement on what you want to be informed on and then set up regular check in times instead?   
    You’re sending them back to the leader they think is micromanaging but with clarity and with a plan. They will feel more confident to handle it themselves – and that’s worth a million bucks. 
    OFFER DIRECT FEEDBACK
    It’s not micromanaging at all, though, if you have seen something personally. That makes it a great opportunity to address it directly.  Be specific with some examples of how you see micromanaging.
    So, ask questions that might create some self-awareness for them >> with things like,
    What are ways that this might be true? might not be true?  What might people be seeing that would lead them to that conclusion?  What are some of the ways you want to shift perceptions going forward?   
    Let them come up with what they want to do differently to become the leader they want to be.
    MANAGE IT DIRECTLY
    All of these things we’ve been talking about are some more direct approaches. I bring them up first because they are harder for most of us to do. It’s okay though, if it’s not a long-term pattern and relationships are all still in tack >> you might just deal with it as part of your general leadership development conversations. 
    Amplify Mission Network Mid Manager Training: Learn More and Sign Up!
    LINKS TO CHECK OUT:
    Send your question HERE – in writing or by recording  Episode 1: Asking Powerful Questions Simon Sinek: How Do You Confront Someone Effectively Blog by Annie: Avoid Micromanaging by Keeping Tasks Delegated Learn more about Annie

    • 9 min
    When the Workload is Too Much

    When the Workload is Too Much

    "How can I help my team when everything is so overwhelming? I want to be encouraging so they don't leave but I don't want to give them false hope that it will get better when it's been this way for a while."
     
    There is something about the last two years that has made the “load” we carry a little heavier. More work, more stress with less staff is a story on repeat. And, we might be facing the situation for a while yet to come. 
     So, I hear ya! It’s time to look at this a different way. 
    LENS OF CLARITY
    One lens we could use is the lens of clarifying what overwhelm is for our people. You might try offering some ideas of what might be contributing to overwhelm and see what resonates with their reality.
    Work-related overwhelm says there is not enough time in the day to get things done. The to-do list is too long. It’s impossible to prioritize. I’m pulled in too many directions.  Confidence-related overwhelm is more internal than external. Not feeling supported or able to get help or maybe a little “imposture syndrome” has set in. Mission-related overwhelm says that if you slow down the mission is compromised. Doing less means that someone isn’t going to get what they need.   
    LENS OF EMPATHY
    Stepping back and pausing to acknowledge that it’s hard. And that it’s real. Living from urgency to urgency isn’t the way it should be – even though that’s what it might be right now.
    It’s easy to miss the signs that people are getting tired, frustrated, discouraged. You get used to living in “crisis” and it is hard to break that cycle.
    What if instead of dismissing it AND before starting to solve it, you acknowledged it? Let people feel it. Talk about what makes it hard. How it feels to be overwhelmed in this moment.
    LENS OF ACTION
    But, there is that lens on taking action. It's the one that we normally look through FIRST. We want to solve it, manage it, stop it >> any action that is going to help us overcome it. 
    Overwhelm is risky business. 
    If you are going to assume the risk and just keep doing what you are doing knowing that it’s risky because your mission needs it to happen then your “action” lens is to:
    Tell everyone what you are doing and why  Add in a high dose of empathy  Hire more people and assume the financial risk to get the work done  
    If you want to mitigate the risk and reduce your chances of experiencing all those nasty side effects of overwhelm, your “action” lens might be: 
    Make sure people use their PTO Increase PTO if the overwhelming season is getting long Plan brain breaks and body breaks in the middle of the day Make small shifts based on how each person describes their own overwhelm I
    f it’s really bad and you and your team have been overwhelmed for a while, it’s time for an intervention – you probably need to eliminate some of the risk:
    Sort through all the things and decide what not to do Prioritize everything and then draw a line – focus above the line   
    I hope the conversation stirs up more questions for you and I hope you ask away!! You can submit your questions HERE! Let’s dig into those real-life, feet-on-the-ground kinds of questions!
    LINKS TO CHECK OUT:
    Send your question HERE – in writing or by recording  Blog by Annie: Adjust Your Pace for Perspective Learn more about Annie

    • 11 min
    Offering Feedback Well

    Offering Feedback Well

    "We just finished a big event. Some things went well and others we need to improve. How do I offer feedback? Especially the corrective feedback?"
     
    Let’s start by asking three questions to help you find YOUR way of offering feedback.
    WHAT'S THE PURPOSE OF YOUR FEEDBACK? Embedded in the question, you’ve got a two-fold purpose already stated – highlighting what went well and what to improve. Now what I’m curious about is what makes communicating those two things really important to you? When values are clear you are going to see evidence of them show up in what you do.
    HOW WILL THE FEEDBACK BE HELPFUL? I was on a team for a volunteer appreciation event for our 1,200 volunteers. Those of us on the team put in a lot of creative energy and a TON of hours to make it happen on that Saturday night. Then, came Monday morning debrief with all the staff. You know the meeting when we spend most of the time talking about all the things that we could do better. I looked around the room and watched those staff in the circle who had worked on the event. This tired team sank in their chairs. 
    I share that story because to be helpful, feedback needs to come from the right people in the right doses. It's not that the feedback of all the staff wasn’t helpful, it just wasn’t helpful in high doses. 
    WHAT DO THEY NEED TO RECEIVE FEEDBACK WELL? We typically give feedback in our own communication style – it’s our natural tendency. 
    If you can step back and ask the question – what do they need? It can change the conversation. It’s definitely more work to push yourself out of your natural way of communicating, but it can make ALL the difference in how feedback is received.
    THREE KINDS OF FEEDBACK Distinguishing the kind of feedback you want to give could make your conversation easier. The three types the book Thanks for the Feedback: The science and art of receiving feedback well by Douglas Stone and Sheila Heen talk about are evaluation, coaching and appreciation.
    Evaluation Feedback Evaluation feedback measuring against some standard or expectation. It can be seen as corrective because you are giving feedback on what does and doesn’t meet the standard. We tend to be more “scared” of this kind of feedback. And, yet, most people really want to know where they stand and in the absence of evaluation feedback they will fill in the gaps with their own assumptions. 
    Coaching Feedback A lot of feedback, though, can fall into the coaching feedback category. Especially for an event that creates an opportunity to develop leadership, decision-making or problem solving skills in your team. And as you try to develop skills or experiment with new responsibilities, coaching feedback might actually be a better choice. You might offer suggestions or share experiences, but the primary goal is to ask questions to give them the opportunity to identify their own gaps and design their own plan for growth.
    Appreciation Feedback Going back to the story I shared about the volunteer appreciation event, what was needed in that situation was more appreciation feedback and less evaluation feedback. Appreciation feedback says “I see you.” “I know how hard you have been working” “You matter to me.” 
    Imagine the power of all three kinds of feedback working together when you offer feedback on your event – listen into the podcast audio and hear some examples you might use of all three types of feedback.
    If you have a question about feedback OR any other leadership questions that come to mind, submit it HERE! Let’s dig into those real-life, feet-on-the-ground kinds of questions!
    Links to check out:
    Send your question HERE – in writing or by recording  Book: Thanks for the Feedback: The science and art of receiving feedback well by Douglas Stone and Sheila Heen Blog by Annie: Let Empathy Influence How You Lead Learn more about Annie

    • 17 min
    Asking Powerful Questions

    Asking Powerful Questions

    Leadership is exponentially better when accompanied by the skill of asking powerful questions.
     
    If you are a problem-solver like me, you might be driving to solutions too quickly and people start running to you to solve the problem instead of taking the ball and running with it. That can be tiring!!! And it limits the team’s potential when leaders become a bottleneck to solving problems.
    Questions have the power to turn the tables – to change that conversation. 
    When I married a scientist who makes a living asking questions to find solutions to seemingly unsolvable things, that’s when I saw this question-asking skill in action. He would answer every question with another question. Only problem in a marriage that can be rather irritating. Maybe in leadership, too! 
    Observing this question-asking skill in my husband was like a confrontation to my well practiced problem solving leadership skills. I felt like it slowed us down every time we were trying to make a decision and get this show on the road. My drive to get to a decision and take action had the potential to make me skip steps or miss out on important information that would help make a better decision.
    I actually have become a keen observer of people who ask questions. I admire them and want to become better and better at asking powerful questions that help others move toward their own solutions or decisions.
    One of my observations is that Jesus in the gospels asked a lot of powerful questions  ….
    EXPAND SELF-AWARENESS You know, those kinds of questions that get people thinking. The ones that turn the mirror around so you see a truer reflection of who you are. They have the power to confront lies with truth, blow up limitations that are holding us back or turn around those false beliefs that keep us trapped. 
    Like when Jesus said to the man at the pool of Bethesda, “Do you want to be made well?” (John 5:6) or to the two blind men in Matthew 9:28 when Jesus asked, “Do you believe that I am able to do this?” In both instances, the questions require the hearer to look inward and do some self-assessment. 
    CHALLENGE OUR ASSUMPTIONS Another kind of question that Jesus asked that always gets my attention is those questions when he challenged assumptions. We are all set in our ways and have our own biases – this is the kind of question that unsettles us. They can be confrontive, yet they are gifts because they shake us out of narrow thinking to broaden our perspective
    Like when Jesus pointed out hypocrisy in the Pharisees about healing on the Sabbath by asking, “Is it lawful on the Sabbath to do good or to do evil, to save life or destroy it? (Luke 6:9) OR with the story of the Good Samaritan where he poses the question, “So which of these three do you think was neighbor to him who fell among the thieves?” (Lk 10:36). In both situations, Jesus demonstrates the complexity of a situation by sharing a story or a parable and then asks a question that challenges their thinking.
    INVITING OTHERS IN Just as much as Jesus used questions to confront, he also used questions to invite people into a deeper relationship or understanding. He asked questions that let the disciples think for themselves – to find their own solutions or recap what they had been learning through an experience. Questions that would lead down the path of deeper knowledge and insight. These kinds of questions are an opportunity for us to grow and to expand our thinking. With these questions, Jesus was able to invite participation instead of telling people what to do or think. 
    When Jesus was having a conversation with the disciples and he asked, “Who do men say that I am?”, they answered him and then he takes it deeper and asks, “Who do you say that I am?” (Mark 8:27-29). He often used these kinds of inviting questions when he was talking with the disciples. 
    LET'S ASK MORE QUESTIONS! I am not saying Jesus always used questions. He gave answers, too. He offere

    • 9 min
    Get the Team You've Always Wanted

    Get the Team You've Always Wanted

    Lead your Leaders is a podcast to answer those tough questions that surface when you're trying to build teams that work better together. You’ve got questions that need answers if you are going to develop your own leadership and make an investment in your team so they can become better leaders, too.
    Tune into a few of the questions leaders are asking about how to get the team they've always wanted:
    "I heard from a team member’s direct report that they feel micromanaged. I probably need to talk to the team member about it, but isn’t it micromanaging if I step in?"
    "We need to make some role changes on our team. Should I write the job description around their strengths or based on what the organization needs?"
    "How can I help my team when everything is so overwhelming? I want to be encouraging so they don't leave but I don't want to give them false hope that it will get better when it's been this way for a while."
    "How do you lead well when Covid has changed the landscape of how to lead people now that they are mostly working from home?"
    "We just finished a big event. Some things went well and others we need to improve. How do I offer feedback? Especially the corrective feedback?"
    "In a small organization how do I manage staff and provide effective leadership with my staff that have turned into friends?"
    Join in the discussion and get answers to your questions in each episode. Got a question you would like answered?
    1. Record or write your question and submit it here: www.leadingbettertogether.com/questions
    2. Email your question to annie@leadingbettertogether.com
    Leader Your Leaders: A podcast to get the team you've always wanted is a production of Leading Better Together Company. 

    • 2 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
11 Ratings

11 Ratings

TheBibleSpeakstoYou.com ,

Great, practical insights

Annie delivers such practical and helpful ideas about nourishing relationships with your team members by seeing them as leaders as well. That makes everyone feel valued. She shares lots of actionable steps to take that can make a big difference in the work place.

Lisadschmidt ,

Practical and Timely advice

I have known Annie for years. She has helped me and countless other navigate tough conversations not just with volunteer leaders, but with friends and family as well. She is able to step back, see the big picture and offer a perspective that I would never see myself. Each episode so far has been packed with practical, timely advice. I can’t wait for more!

Hdog97 ,

Wow!

Annie is so relatable. She is full of wisdom and gives real and practical advice.

Top Podcasts In Business

Ramsey Network
Andy Frisella #100to0
Jocko DEFCOR Network
NPR
BiggerPockets
Tim Ferriss: Bestselling Author, Human Guinea Pig