55 episodes

The Leo Baeck Institute London is devoted to the study of German-Jewish history and culture. The LBI is an independent charity and aims to preserve and research this history by organizing innovative research projects, Fellowship programmes, and public events. Through the lens of German-Jewish history, the Institute seeks to address some of the most topical and timely questions of our times.

Leo Baeck Institute London Leo Baeck Institute London

    • Education

The Leo Baeck Institute London is devoted to the study of German-Jewish history and culture. The LBI is an independent charity and aims to preserve and research this history by organizing innovative research projects, Fellowship programmes, and public events. Through the lens of German-Jewish history, the Institute seeks to address some of the most topical and timely questions of our times.

    Who was Fritz Kittel? A German Railway Worker Decides, 1933–2022

    Who was Fritz Kittel? A German Railway Worker Decides, 1933–2022

    Reading: Esther Dischereit together with Jonny Ball.

    In 2023, Esther Dischereit created an exhibition in cooperation with Deutsche Bahn to honour the railroad worker Fritz Kittel. In 1944 and 1945, he hid her mother Hella and sister Hannelore, who as Jews were persecuted by the Gestapo and threatened with death in Germany under National Socialism. They were liberated by U.S. troops in 1945. Dischereit began to search for the family of the rescuer and found them in 2019. Fritz Kittel had not told his own family about his courageous act throughout his life.

    Esther Dischereit's literary response in 17 text pieces includes other found objects from the lives of her mother, sister, and Fritz Kittel, and they offer a dialogue with those who are now the daughters and sons or grandchildren. False information given at a registration office, illegal names and addresses ... What do we read when we read these documents? What do we see when we look at these photos? 

    Esther Dischereit lives in Berlin, writes prose, poems, essays, and radio works. She is considered one of the most important voices of Jewish literature in Germany in the second generation after the Shoah. She was honoured with the prestigious Erich Fried Prize for her work in 2009. She was a professor at the University of Applied Arts in Vienna from 2012 to 2017 and held a chair in contemporary poetics at NYU in 2019. Among her most recent publications and projects Hab keine Angst! Erzähl alles. Das Attentat von Halle und die Stimmen der Überlebenden (Ed., 2020); Sometimes a Single Leaf (2020) and Flowers for Otello On the Crimes that Came out of Jena (2022) – both translated by Iain Galbraith, as well as Wer war Fritz Kittel, Exhibition 2023: Berlin / Frankfurt am Main / Chemnitz / Nürnberg.



    Lecture recorded at Senate House, London

    Tuesday, February 6, 2024 - 18:00

    Images from the lecture, and other streaming links, are available on the Leo Baeck Institute London website: https://www.leobaeck.co.uk/events/special-events/who-was-fritz-kittel-german-railway-worker-decides-1933-2022



    This lecture is a collaboration between the Leo Baeck Institute London and the Goethe-Institut London.







    Poster photo credits: ©Abraham Pissarek, ©Katrin Hammer / Deutsche Bahn AG, ©Katrin Hammer / Deutsche Bahn AG 

    • 1 hr 31 min
    Dressing Eve: Re-drawing Biblical Women through Comics

    Dressing Eve: Re-drawing Biblical Women through Comics

    Dr Sarah Lightman



    Jewish women have been at the forefront of feminist autobiographical comics since the 1970’s as they challenged sexism in popular culture. But how have they revised misogynistic images and stories closer to home? Sarah Lightman will illustrate how Sharon Rudahl in her bildungsroman ‘The Star Sapphire’, Miriam Katin in her Holocaust memoir, We Are on Our Own, and her own graphic novel, The Book of Sarah, transform biblical narratives and images to reflect their own, lived, experiences.



    Sarah Lightman is an artist, writer and Faculty at The Royal Drawing School, London. She attended the Slade School of Art for her BA and MFA, University of Glasgow for her PhD and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Birkbeck, University of London (2018-21). She edited the multi-award-winning Graphic Details: Jewish Women’s Confessional Comics in Essays and Interviews (McFarland, 2014), published her autobiographical graphic novel, The Book of Sarah (Myriad Editions and Penn State UP, 2019) and co-edited Jewish Women in Comics: Bodies and Borders (Syracuse UP, 2023).



    This season’s lecture series seeks to explore the connection of visual narratives in the context of beauty, ugliness and morality with representations of Jews and Jewishness in the Western world from the Middle Ages to the present day. We aim to examine the subject from different historical, social and artistic perspectives ranging from medieval mythology to Orientalism, Zionism, Feminism or modern aesthetics, and through the lens of a selection of diverse media including painting, photography and comics.



    Lecture recorded at Senate House, Malet St, London WC1E 7HUThursday, November 30, 2023 - 18:30



    More information: https://www.leobaeck.co.uk/events/leo-baeck-institute-london-lecture-series-2023/dressing-eve-re-drawing-biblical-women



    #Comics #Comic #WomenInComics #WomenInArt #WomensArt #JewishArt #FemaleArtists #Artist #Illustrator#Judaism #JewishHistory #jewishculture #LondonEvent #LondonEvents #AuthorTalk #Author #OnlineLecture #LeoBaeckInstituteLondon #UniversityOfLondon #Bloomsbury #SenateHouse

    • 1 hr 13 min
    The Shoah and the Tragedy of Assimilation: Lessons from one German-Jewish family

    The Shoah and the Tragedy of Assimilation: Lessons from one German-Jewish family

    Simon May

    Thursday, October 26, 2023 - 18:30

    Between 1933 and 1941, Simon May’s mother and her two sisters pushed the boundaries of assimilation among German Jews to their limits. They resorted to conversion, aristocratic marriages, and ‘Aryan’ certificates, which likely saved them from the death camps. However, this marked the defeat of the hope that such strategies would secure acceptance for Jews in German and European society. It led to a unique vulnerability, as these three women – and many others like them – distanced themselves from their cultural roots, leaving them emotionally defenceless when disaster struck. This self-inflicted psychic violence presents challenges for their descendants, grappling with questions of identity and belonging in a world in which millions of people continue to be forcibly displaced.

    Simon May is Visiting Professor of Philosophy at King’s College London. His interests lie in ethics, philosophy of the emotions, questions of identity and belonging, and German 19th and 20th Century thought. His books include Nietzsche’s Ethics and His War on ‘Morality’ (1999), Love: A History (2011), Love: A New Understanding of an Ancient Emotion(2019) and The Power of Cute (2019), alongside his widely praised family memoir How To Be A Refugee (2021). May’s work has been translated into ten languages and regularly features in major newspapers worldwide. 

     

    This lecture was organised by the Leo Baeck Institute London and was held at the Keynes Library, Birkbeck's School of Arts, 43 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PD.



    Images from the lecture, and podcast streaming links, are available on the Leo Baeck Institute London website at https://www.leobaeck.co.uk/biennial-lecture-2023

    • 1 hr 33 min
    What a shayna punim!: Cute Jews, Photography, and Jewish Regeneration

    What a shayna punim!: Cute Jews, Photography, and Jewish Regeneration

    Prof Daniel Magilow

    Jüdische Kinder in Erez Israel, a collection of twenty-one photographs of adorable Jewish children in Mandatory Palestine, was the last overtly Jewish-themed photobook published in Germany before the Holocaust. Yet its propaganda mission transcended its diminutive size and surface superficiality. This talk examines how this photobook creates an allegory of Jewish vulnerability by eliciting responses associated with the minor aesthetic category of ‘cuteness.’ In so doing, it broadens our understanding of how photobooks helped expand the visual lexicon and aesthetic strategies central to Jewish cultural and political regeneration.

    Daniel H. Magilow is Professor of German at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville and Co-Editor-in-Chief of Holocaust and Genocide Studies. His research centers on photography and its intersections with Holocaust Studies, Weimar Germany, and postwar memory. He has authored and edited six books, including The Photography of Crisis: The Photo Essays of Weimar Germany and Holocaust Representations in History: An Introduction.

    Held as part of the Leo Baeck Institute London Lecture Series 2023 at Senate House, Malet St, London WC1E 7HU on Thursday, October 12, 2023 at 18:30.



    This season’s lecture series seeks to explore the connection of visual narratives in the context of beauty, ugliness and morality with representations of Jews and Jewishness in the Western world from the Middle Ages to the present day. We aim to examine the subject from different historical, social and artistic perspectives ranging from medieval mythology to Orientalism, Zionism, Feminism or modern aesthetics, and through the lens of a selection of diverse media including painting, photography and comics.


    #OldPhoto #OldPhotos #OldPhotograph #OldPhotographs #Identity#HistoricalResearch #JewishHistory #JewishCulture #Podcast #VisitingLecturer #LeoBaeckInstituteLondon #UniversityOfLondon #Bloomsbury #LondonEvent #LondonEvents #Lecture #GuestLecturer #SenateHouse #OnlineLecture #InPersonEvent #FreeAdmission #ZoomLecture #AuthorTalk #Author

    • 1 hr 9 min
    German Jews, English Gentry: The Messel Family and the Cultural Expression of a Changing Identity

    German Jews, English Gentry: The Messel Family and the Cultural Expression of a Changing Identity

    Leo Baeck Institute London Summer Lecture
    Speaker: John Hilary, honorary professor at the University of Nottingham

    The conspicuous set of German-Jewish financiers who made their homes in late Victorian and Edwardian Britain brought with them a rich cultural inheritance that reflected the historical journey of German Jewry towards emancipation. As they established themselves in their new environment, they faced the challenge of being at one and the same time German, Jewish, British and English, and the crisis of having to choose between allegiances in the dark days of the First World War.

    This lecture explores the diverse ways in which the artistic Messel family chose to express the different facets of their identity as it evolved through the generations. Drawing comparisons with other high-profile German-Jewish migrants to Britain during the same period, it examines the successes and failures of their strategies to assimilate into their host society.

    John Hilary is an honorary professor at the University of Nottingham and author of From Refugees to Royalty: The Remarkable Story of the Messel Family of Nymans (Peter Owen, 2021). An affiliate of the Jewish Country Houses project run out of the University of Oxford, he co-edited a special issue of the Journal of the History of Collections in 2022 on the theme of ‘Bildung beyond borders: German-Jewish collectors outside Germany, c.1870–1940’.

    Thursday, June 29, 2023 at 18:30
    Held at the German Historical Institute London

    https://www.leobaeck.co.uk/events/special-events/german-jews-english-gentry-messel-family-and-cultural-expression-changing



    #EnglishCountryHomes #CountryHouses #BritishHistory #Aristocracy #Identity #HomesAndGardens #Photographs #OldPhotographs #HistoricBuildings #Architecture #Lecture #HistoricalResearch #Gardens #EnglishGardens #Art #Authors #Emancipation #FirstWorldWar #JewishHistory #JewishCulture #BritishCulture #Podcast #VisitingLecturer #LeoBaeckInstituteLondon #UniversityofOxford #NationalTrust #StatelyHome #UniversityOfNottingham

    • 1 hr 29 min
    Marked Off in the Eyes of the Public: Anti-Jewish Imagery and the Politics of Prejudice

    Marked Off in the Eyes of the Public: Anti-Jewish Imagery and the Politics of Prejudice

    Sara Lipton
    Stony Brook University, NY, USA

    Art can be a powerful force in shaping the way we see and think about the world: pictures craft our ideas of beauty and ugliness, good and bad, power and weakness. This lecture traces how medieval Christian images of Jews, originally designed to aid religious devotions, made Christians look at Jews with new curiosity and interest, and drew their attention to previously unnoticed aspects of Jewish life and looks. As images of Jews evolved from benign but outdated Hebrews to caricatured usurers and demonic sorcerers, Christian society developed new – and increasingly hostile – ideas about and policies toward Jews, whose effects have endured to this day.

    Sara Lipton is Professor of History at the State University of New York, Stony Brook and a Fellow of the Medieval Academy of America the Royal Historical Society (UK). She is currently a Visiting Fellow at All Souls College, Oxford. Her most recent book is Dark Mirror: The Medieval Origins of Anti-Jewish Iconography (2014).


    This season’s lecture series seeks to explore the connection of visual narratives in the context of beauty, ugliness and morality with representations of Jews and Jewishness in the Western world from the Middle Ages to the present day. We aim to examine the subject from different historical, social and artistic perspectives ranging from medieval mythology to Orientalism, Zionism, Feminism or modern aesthetics, and through the lens of a selection of diverse media including painting, photography and comics.

    Lecture recorded at the German Historical Institute, 17 Bloomsbury Square London WC1A 2NJThursday, June 8, 2023

    More information: https://www.leobaeck.co.uk/events/leo-baeck-institute-london-lecture-series-2023/sara-lipton-marked-eyes-public-anti-jewish

    #MedievalArt #ChristianImages #Christianity #Islam #ReligiousImagery #VisualNarratives #Representation #BritishHistory #Stereotypes #MedievalStudies #ArtHistory 

    #Judaism #JewishHistory #JewishCulture #JewishImagery #Prejudice #ArtandSociety #GermanHistory #BritishHistory #CulturalRepresentation #ReligiousHistory #Lecture #LectureSeries #AcademicTalk #Art #Religion #ArtandSociety #GermanHistory  #CulturalRepresentation

    #LeoBaeckInstitute #LeoBaeckInstituteLondon

    • 1 hr 25 min

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