24 episodes

Liberty Explained is your guide to libertarianism. Chris Spangle takes your questions about libertarianism applied to politics and culture. Please send your questions to chris@chrisspangle.com.
Part of the We Are Libertarians Podcast Network.

Liberty Explained - The Basics of Libertarianism We Are Libertarians

    • Education
    • 4.5 • 20 Ratings

Liberty Explained is your guide to libertarianism. Chris Spangle takes your questions about libertarianism applied to politics and culture. Please send your questions to chris@chrisspangle.com.
Part of the We Are Libertarians Podcast Network.

    Do I have to be a “pure” libertarian to join?

    Do I have to be a “pure” libertarian to join?

    Do I have to be “pure” to be a libertarian? Can I be a good enough libertarian? In other words, Is it possible to be more libertarian than another person? Libertarianism isn’t a monolithic or rigid ideology; one doesn’t need to adhere to a “pure” form to identify as a libertarian. It's a framework for social organization rooted in the belief that individuals cannot organize complex societies, necessitating a reliance on and trust in fellow humans. The path to embracing libertarianism, marked by relinquishing control, varies for individuals, and old beliefs shaped by prevailing political ideologies can influence this journey. While some might be perceived as "more libertarian" due to a deeper philosophical understanding or advocacy for radical solutions, the ideology accommodates diverse perspectives. Figures like Justin Amash, Murray Rothbard, and Ayn Rand exemplify this diversity within libertarianism. Though ideology is a constant measure for political positions, flexibility is integral for libertarian politicians navigating the art of compromise.
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    • 6 min
    Can you punish a child under the NAP? What do libertarians believe about corporal punishment?

    Can you punish a child under the NAP? What do libertarians believe about corporal punishment?

    Can you punish a child under the NAP? What do libertarians believe about corporal punishment? Children should be guided and nurtured, not subjected to violence, due to their developing mental and emotional capacities. As noted by Dakota Hensley on WeAreLibertarians.com, children are unique individuals who require the guidance of family and community, emphasizing a collective responsibility. They are not property but young individuals whose form of individualism is distinct from that of adults. When parents fall short in their roles, the community is responsible for stepping in, and prioritizing the child’s welfare and development, potentially through forming a voluntary Child Protective Service. This dual support system shapes the child's worldview and interaction with their surroundings.
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    • 5 min
    How can equal opportunity exist when so many have so much wealth? What would be done about the 1%?

    How can equal opportunity exist when so many have so much wealth? What would be done about the 1%?

    How can equal opportunity exist when so many have so much wealth? What would be done about the 1%? Equal opportunity, though a sought-after ideal, remains elusive across various governance systems, including libertarianism. No society, regardless of its level of freedom or control, can claim absolute equality of opportunity in aspects beyond just education. In libertarianism, for instance, it’s unfeasible to mandate equal educational opportunities when affluent families have the means to elevate their children’s learning experiences. However, a distinction exists between open societies like the U.S. and closed ones like North Korea, where wealth and power are rigidly centralized. In more open societies, wealth is relatively fluid, with family fortunes often dispersing within a few generations, fostering opportunities across socioeconomic classes. In contrast, closed societies rigidly centralize and retain wealth within a select elite, stifling opportunity and mobility for the broader population.
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    • 4 min
    What should I do if I want to run? What do I need to prepare for?

    What should I do if I want to run? What do I need to prepare for?

    What should I do if I want to run? What do I need to prepare for? Aspiring political candidates should begin by identifying and understanding the core issues of their specific race, ensuring alignment with the local community's needs. Gaining insights through attending city or county meetings and connecting with political parties at the county or state level is crucial for training and support. The journey to office involves active engagement with party insiders, voters, and media, emphasizing authenticity and relationship building. Resources like Ron Faucheux’s books and the Upward – Libertarian Activism podcast can provide additional guidance for those preparing to step into the political arena with integrity and commitment.
    Learn Libertarianism - https://libertyexplained.com/ 
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    • 3 min
    The NAP is the only requirement members of the LP must agree to. Is that a good standard?

    The NAP is the only requirement members of the LP must agree to. Is that a good standard?

    The NAP is the only requirement members of the Libertarian Party must agree to. Is that a good standard? The Non-Aggression Principle (NAP) serves as a unifying ethos for members of the Libertarian Party, mandating a collective agreement to abstain from using force to achieve political or social objectives. Although the political landscape is rife with diverse ideologies, the NAP acts as a common ground for Libertarians, distinguishing them from other political affiliations. Instituted by the party's founder, David Nolan, in 1971, this pledge was designed to characterize the party as a non-violent political entity, especially significant at a time when violence was a common political tool. Despite its inherent imperfections, the Libertarian pledge is celebrated for its capacity to instill focus and cohesion among party members, transcending the multifaceted ideologies and beliefs that reside within its ranks.
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    • 7 min
    Why does it seem like there are so many gatekeepers within the movement?

    Why does it seem like there are so many gatekeepers within the movement?

    The libertarian movement, still young and relatively small, contends with the appearance of gatekeeping due to its nascent stage and the intimate nature of its networks. Originating mainly in the 1970s, the movement has seen individuals attempt to assert dominance, forming distinct factions and perceived gatekeeping. Such divisions can sometimes hinder unity, exacerbated by the personal relationships within a smaller group where critiques can be direct and personal. However, gatekeeping holds limited power in the digital age, with easier access to diverse voices. Platforms like We Are Libertarians (WAL) aim for inclusivity, valuing all contributions to the movement. Depersonalizing criticism and fostering a more inclusive perspective can strengthen unity within the movement.
    Learn Libertarianism - https://libertyexplained.com/ 
    Subscribe to the podcast - https://link.chtbl.com/liberty-explained
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    • 4 min

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5
20 Ratings

20 Ratings

thatguy188 ,

This kind of podcast is needed BUT

Like the title says, a podcast like this needs to exist. The issue however is when the first episode seems to make fun of “Cart Pushers” by calling them “Cart Boy” and “Cart Monkey”, it leaves a bad taste in my mouth. They’re doing a job that if they didn’t, you’d be ramming buggies due to people like the host. Disappointed unfortunately.

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