27 episodes

Here we rediscover the vanished and forgotten places in one of America's oldest states, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. It could be a ghost town, it could be a former neighborhood reclaimed for industrial use. Sometimes we hike into the wilderness, sometimes the lost world is beneath a busy street. Maybe you live on top of a forgotten settlement? Walk along with us on the lost road. More at LOSTMASSACHUSETTS.COM Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/lostmass/support

Lost Massachusetts Garth Bruen

    • History
    • 5.0 • 11 Ratings

Here we rediscover the vanished and forgotten places in one of America's oldest states, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. It could be a ghost town, it could be a former neighborhood reclaimed for industrial use. Sometimes we hike into the wilderness, sometimes the lost world is beneath a busy street. Maybe you live on top of a forgotten settlement? Walk along with us on the lost road. More at LOSTMASSACHUSETTS.COM Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/lostmass/support

    Niew Nederlandt: Lost Dutch Mass. E25

    Niew Nederlandt: Lost Dutch Mass. E25

    For a number of reasons Massachusetts is thought of as a product of British colonialism. We fought a revolution against the British, English is our primary language, our legal system is based on English law, and the state is part of “New England”. However, many may be surprised that before Massachusetts became English it was Dutch. Cape Cod was referred to as New Holland and most of the Northeast was either called New Belgium or New Netherlands. The dutch were setting up shop in Mass. a decade before the Pilgrims set foot in Plymouth. Yes, long before the English colonial charters were issued, Dutch explorers pushed through the wilderness, traded with native tribes, built settlements and created maps that showed them controlling the entire territory. What did Dutch Mass look like? What happened to it? Can we see any of it today? The Dutch did not control Massachusetts by the end of the 17th century and is generally not thought of as Dutch today. This episode of Lost Massachusetts starts with the early history of Dutch claims while pointing out a number of things that have Dutch origins. We interview Dutch Emma, who has lived in Massachusetts for years, about her knowledge of the Dutch legacy. 

    Adriaen Block (thehistoryjunkie.com)

    Hendrick Christiaensen (newpaltz.edu)

    Cornelius Jacobsen May (newnetherlandinstitute.org)

    Block’s Map (nyc99.org)

    New Netherlands Map (hjbltd.com)

    Later English Map with some Dutch names (natedsanders.com)

    Dutch Colonies (nps.gov)

    Get at Lost Massachusetts Postcard from a Lost Place

    LostMass Podcast Reviews at Apple (podcasts.apple.com)

    Photos at: instagram.com/lostmassachusetts

    Sound Effects From Zapsplat (zapsplat.com)

    Music Courtesy of Free Music Archive (freemusicarchive.org)

    More on lostmassachusetts.com


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    • 33 min
    YOUR Haunted House Stories E24

    YOUR Haunted House Stories E24

    Did you have a dark, creepy house in your neighborhood growing up?

    Lost Massers, I’m looking for your input! I want you to send me a short ghost story about where you grew up.

    We’re developing a concept for our Halloween episode this year and its related to Haunted Houses, not haunted attractions but real haunted houses you may have grown up with in your hometown in Massachusetts.

    I had several where I grew up, rotting, decrepit old mansions that were set back from the road or on a hilltop somewhere. Sometimes they were completely empty, sometimes someone lived there, but someone we never saw. Kids would dare each other to bike by the house, ring the doorbell, look through the windows.

    The key is that legends would grow around these creepy buildings, rumors, weirdness, spooky occurrences, exaggerated tales about the history of the place. I think every town in Massachusetts had at least one and I know you all remember them and the stories behind the ghost houses.

    What kind of short stories am I talking about?

    I’ll give you a quick example: On my street growing up there was a boarded up house that for some reason kept getting newspapers delivered to it for years. They would pile up on the doorstep, get yellow with sun, they melt into pulpy piles because of the rain and snow, but there would always be fresh ones on top of the old trash.I finally met the kid who delivered the papers on his bike and I asked him about it. He said there was an envelope with cash in it every week plus tip left for him in the mailbox so he kept brining the papers. but he never saw anyone in the house.

    That’s what Im talking about, what’s your old neighborhood haunted house?

    I’m sure many of them are now gone, knocked down and replaced with a development, a department store or a McMansion. Some are just overgrown fields with old wall around them, there are a few like the in my town now.

    Here’s what you can do: I want you to send those stories and I will read or play them on the show. There are a few ways you can get these stories to lost Massachusetts. You can write us through our usual contact methods or you can send a voice message that we will play in the show.

    You can send us voice message through our Instagram account lostmassachusetts or you can go to the podcast’s home page on anchor at anchor.fm/lostmass via the message button. Be sure to drop us a email or text note if you leave a voice message so we know to look for it.

    A few rules about this, the haunted house has to have been in a Massachusetts town, you have to mention the name of the town as part of the story.

    1. This has to be a quote unquote real haunted house not a cool haunted attraction you went to.

    2. If you don’t want your name mentioned don’t say it in your recording.

    3. This is mostly a family show, so keep it clean - except for the gruesome ghoulish details of the creepy old house.

    4. We want to publish these in an episode for the week of halloween and we have to edit them so please get them to us by October 24.

    Thanks, looking forward to your spooky submissions

    Get at Lost Massachusetts Postcard from a Lost Place

    LostMass Podcast Reviews at Apple (podcasts.apple.com)

    More on lostmassachusetts.com


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    • 11 min
    Lost Highway: Abandoned Interstate 95 E23

    Lost Highway: Abandoned Interstate 95 E23

    Closed section of Interstate 95 now hiking/biking trail. You can walk on a real Lost Highway...Just off the real Interstate 95 in Newburyport there is a hidden nature trail that is actually a paved road. Originally, a relocated section of Route 1 it was repurposed as part of the new Interstate system only to be abandoned and replaced with updated sections of 95. Converted into recreational area, this is a great place to explore and wonder at how nature reclaims what leave behind but still leaves discoverable pieces under new growth.  

    Also, we review comments from Episode 22: The Ursuline Convent Fire and invite listeners to participate in our upcoming Halloween episode and get their own postcard from a Lost Place.

    Gloria Braunhardt Bike/Pedestrian Trail (littlerivertrailsystem.com)

    "Little River Trail System  is a 3.5 mile lightly trafficked loop trail located near Newburyport, Massachusetts that features a great forest setting and is good for all skill levels. The trail is primarily used for hiking, bird watching, and mountain biking. Dogs are also able to use this trail but must be kept on leash." (alltrails.com)

    Abandoned I-95 NB (alpsroads.net)

    "What is now a popular recreational trail in the northeastern Massachusetts city of Newburyport was once a northbound alignment of Interstate 95, and before that, part of a relocated US 1. A trip down this 1.1 mile long abandoned section of highway shows a road that was left mostly intact, complete with the original pavement, curb cuts and pavement markings." (gribblenation.org)

    Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1956: Creating The Interstate System (highways.dot.gov)

    Interstate 95 (interstate-guide.com)

    Fallout 4 Commonwealth Map (ign.com)

    Fallout 4 Map (fallout4map.com)

    Get at Lost Massachusetts Postcard from a Lost Place

    LostMass Podcast Reviews at Apple (podcasts.apple.com)

    Photos at: instagram.com/lostmassachusetts

    Sound Effects From Zapsplat (zapsplat.com)

    Music Courtesy of Free Music Archive (freemusicarchive.org)

    More on lostmassachusetts.com


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    • 31 min
    Ursuline Convent Fire E22

    Ursuline Convent Fire E22

    In 1834 Boston's growing Irish Catholic immigrant community met the fiery resistance of a suspicious native Protestant Yankee mob. The Ursuline Convent and School in Charlestown (now Somerville) was burned to the ground following strange rumors of women being held captive and even murdered behind the walls. But Bostons Irish would not be deterred and rose from the ashes in a triumphant symbol that can still be seen today.

    "The Ursuline Convent had been a longtime dream of one of the first Catholic priests in Boston. The Rev. John Thayer wanted to help his impoverished parishioners by bringing Ursuline nuns to teach the city's poor Catholic girls. The Ursulines were pioneers in women's education, and their first-rate schools in Europe attracted both Catholics and Protestants." (massmoments.org)

    "Many bizarre tales were circulating at the time about sisters who had escaped from the “horrors of the cloister.” Although these accounts were later proven false, they were generally believed by the working classes." (historicipswich.org)

    "The rioters shattered the convent's windows, broke down the front door, and burst into the building. They went on a rampage, destroying furniture, musical instruments, books, and religious items, and then set the building on fire." (massmoments.org)

    Fire & Roses: The Burning of the Charlestown Convent, 1834 - by Nancy Lusignan Schultz (fireandroses.com)

    The Burning of the Charlestown Ursuline Convent and School (charlestownhistoricalsociety.org)

    Firemen and Irish Clash in Boston Riot (massmoments.org)

    Cathedral of the Holy Cross, THE MOTHER CHURCH OF THE ROMAN CATHOLIC ARCHDIOCESE OF BOSTON (holycrossboston.com)

    Get at Lost Massachusetts Postcard from a Lost Place

    LostMass Podcast Reviews at Apple (podcasts.apple.com)

    Photos at: instagram.com/lostmassachusetts

    Sound Effects From Zapsplat (zapsplat.com)

    Music Courtesy of Free Music Archive (freemusicarchive.org)

    More on lostmassachusetts.com


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    • 42 min
    Worcester Weird Road Trip Memories E21

    Worcester Weird Road Trip Memories E21

    Sights and sites to see in an and around Worcester Mass. that may puzzle or intrigue you. We discuss the concept of road trips in general and explain how the road trip itself started in Massachusetts. I want to talk about 5 or so things. A hat, a tower, a pumpkin, an unpronounceable name, and a strange street. 

    The Duryea Brothers of Automobile History (thoughtco.com)

    Stephen Jendrysik: Chicopee played important role in the early 20th century auto industry (masslive.com)

    Pastie Duggan (patsiedugans.com)

    Golemos Market (golemos-market.food96.com)

    "Bancroft Tower is a 56-foot-high natural stone and granite tower, which looks like a miniature feudal castle. It is located in Salisbury Park, in the city of Worcester, Massachusetts. It was erected in 1900, in memory of George Bancroft." (discovercentralma.org)

    "Salisbury's interest in archeology was sparked during his first visit to the Yucatan peninsula in 1862. He wrote several essays on South American archeology for the Proceedings of the American Antiquarian Society, including "Dr. LePlongeon in Yucatan," (1877) and "Terra Cotta Figure from Isla Mujeres," (1878)." (americanantiquarian.org)

    Salusbury Mansion/Worcester Historical Museum (worcesterhistory.org)

    Worcester Art Museum (worcesterart.org)

    The American Antiquarian Society (americanantiquarian.org)

    Grave of Stephen Salisbury III (findagrave.com)

    The Central Massachusetts Korean War Memorial (kwmworcester.org)

    The Epic Halloween Store In Massachusetts That Gets Better Year After Year (onlyinyourstate.com)

    Chargoggagoggmanchauggagoggchaubunagungamaugg (ctmq.org)

    11 Places in The World You'll Never Be Able to Pronounce (theculturetrip.com)

    LostMass Podcast Reviews at Apple (podcasts.apple.com)

    Photos at: instagram.com/lostmassachusetts

    Sound Effects From Zapsplat (zapsplat.com)

    Music Courtesy of Free Music Archive (freemusicarchive.org)

    More on lostmassachusetts.com


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    • 35 min
    Upton Chamber E20

    Upton Chamber E20

    Mysterious (or not so much) manmade(?) cave in Upton - Attributed to various groups but still unsolved, the Upton Chamber is one of hundreds of structures throughout the region with an unknown past. It is, however, the largest and most accessible (and probably the coldest). 

    "The Upton Stone Chamber is part of Upton Heritage Park located at 18 Elm Street. The park is now open to the public. The chamber and the nearby stone cairns on Pratt Hill are on the National Register. In 2011, the entrance to the chamber was restored by master stonemason David Stewart-Smith and David Wiggins. As part of the restoration project, archaeologists from John Milner Associates conducted an archaeological investigation." (stonestructures.org)

    "...no artifacts have been found inside Upton Stone Chamber or most of the other stone chambers for that matter. So, what was the purpose of the stone chamber in Massachusetts?" (ancientpages.com)

    A Visit to the Upton Chamber (newenglandfolklore.blogspot.com)

    "A six foot high fourteen foot long tunnel leads into the mammoth chamber. The chamber is twelve feet in diameter and twelve feet high and beehive in shape, like a large stone igloo. Upton chamber is an amazing work of dry masonry with a cap stone weighing several tons." (strange-new-england.com)

    The official site of the Tribal Government and Citizens of Nipmuc Nation (nipmucnation.org)

    Christopher W Pittman - "Cellar Walls" list of mysterious structures in New England (cellarwalls.com)

    Stone Structures & Rock Art (neara.org)

    Now Mostly Forgotten, Root Cellars Were Once Fundamental to American Settlers (dustyoldthing.com)

    Chamber of mystery (archive.boston.com)

    Cooling Takes Off in the Roaring Twenties (achrnews.com)

    Pleiades: The Seven Sisters Star Cluster (space.com)

    Pictures at: instagram.com/lostmassachusetts

    Music Courtesy of Free Music Archive (freemusicarchive.org)

    More on lostmassachusetts.com


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    • 40 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
11 Ratings

11 Ratings

Kevinr5 ,

Great pod

Informative and I really liked it since I listened to the whole podcast in a week

Farqie ,

Fun and informative podcast

Great subject matter. Interesting perspectives. Garth does an excellent job of bringing our state’s past into today’s world. His storytelling and comfort level gets better with each new episode. Keep up the good work!

CigarGuy1985 ,

Brings me back!

While I have not lived in Massachusetts for close to a decade, I listen to this podcast regularly. Garth’s fantastic storytelling transports me back to the wonderful commonwealth and all of it’s wonder. Keep up the good work and give us some more!!

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