37 episodes

Here we rediscover the vanished and forgotten places in one of America's oldest states, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. It could be a ghost town, it could be a former neighborhood reclaimed for industrial use. Sometimes we hike into the wilderness, sometimes the lost world is beneath a busy street. Maybe you live on top of a forgotten settlement? Walk along with us on the lost road. More at LOSTMASSACHUSETTS.COM Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/lostmass/support

Lost Massachusetts Garth Bruen

    • History
    • 5.0 • 16 Ratings

Here we rediscover the vanished and forgotten places in one of America's oldest states, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. It could be a ghost town, it could be a former neighborhood reclaimed for industrial use. Sometimes we hike into the wilderness, sometimes the lost world is beneath a busy street. Maybe you live on top of a forgotten settlement? Walk along with us on the lost road. More at LOSTMASSACHUSETTS.COM Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/lostmass/support

    The Fo'Castle E35

    The Fo'Castle E35

    Outermost house of Henry Beston. Come with us over the sand dune cliff to search for Henry Beston's lost Outermost House in the most recent episode: The Fo'Castle E35. 

    "Sleep gone and past recapture, I drew on my clothes and went to the beach. In the luminous east, two great stars aslant were rising clear of the exhalations of darkness gathered at the rim of night and ocean-Betelgeuse and Bellatrix, the shoulders of Orion. Autumn had come, and the Giant stood again at the horizon of day and the ebbing year, his belt still hidden in the bank of cloud, his feet in the deeps of space and the far surges of the sea." From The Outermost House.

    Quincy native Henry Beston joined the French Amy in 1915 and served as an ambulance driver. Like Ernest Hemingway, he wrote about his experience, also like Hemingway he became a journalist for a time, covering the war. He knew cape cod from studying coast guard stations along the cape for a magazine. The recently formed Coast Guard provided, and still provides, a critical service in the area. The ocean around Cape Cod is one of the most dangerous places in the world to sail.

    Looking for solace, Beston we went to the beaches of Estham, the furthest point out, as far as he could be from the world, as close to the sea as he could be. He spent a year looking for what he called the Devine Mystery of Nature where a man could cease being a man and become part of something else. He would study and record the sights and sounds of nature. The book he created is cited as the impetus for the preservation of Cape Cod’s natural resources. Beston’s book changed the way people thought about nature, not just something to be feared but also something to be respected and managed.

    About ten years after the house was built a storm nearly destroyed it, so it was moved back. 10  years after that, the dune it sat on started to collapse so they moved it again, this time behind the dune. But the sea takes what it wants to. In February of 1978 the Fo’castle was pulled into the ocean by one of the most powerful and destructive storms in the history of Massachusetts, our famous blizzard, a single storm that left 27 inches of snow, shut down the state for a week and killed over 100 people. Not only was the house lost, but the very ground it stood on is now under water.

    We also respond to listener questions and comments!

    Coast Guard Beach

    The Outermost House Historical Marker

    Henry Beston

    Get at Lost Massachusetts Postcard from a Lost Place

    Photos at: instagram.com/lostmassachusetts

    Sound Effects From Zapsplat (zapsplat.com)

    Music Courtesy of Free Music Archive (freemusicarchive.org)




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    • 36 min
    Dogtown, Mass. P3: Redemption E28

    Dogtown, Mass. P3: Redemption E28

    Once a place of despair, mischief and mystery, Dogtown is now place for inspirational hikes. This is a follow up to Episode 2: Ghost Towns and Phantom Roads and Episode 6: The Accursed Land. In this episode we focus in the physical transformation of Dogtown by Roger Babson and the historical preservation of the cellar hole sites. Visit the episode blog for photographs and details. You will need three maps: 1. Dogtown Cellar Hole Map, 2. Babson Boulder Map 3. Dogtown Trail Map (shout out to Cape Cod author Eric Bickernicks for collecting all of this information). 

    DOGTOWN, MASSACHUSETTS (gutenberg.org)

    Dogtown: Location, History, and Legends (northshore.edu)

    Dogtown (Dogtown Common or Dogtown Village) (essexheritage.org)

    The Mystery of Dogtown | New England’s Most Famous Abandoned Settlement (newengland.com)

    You can get a Lost Massachusetts Postcard from Dogtown!

    Photos and discussion at: instagram.com/lostmassachusetts

    Sound Effects From Zapsplat (zapsplat.com)

    Music Courtesy of Free Music Archive (freemusicarchive.org)

    Everything at lostmassachusetts.com


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    • 28 min
    Boston's Dying Gaslight E34

    Boston's Dying Gaslight E34

    By the dying gaslight

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    • 27 min
    Viking MASS E33

    Viking MASS E33

    Viking MASS part one...It is claimed by many people that there was viking exploration and even settlement of Massachusetts seven or eight hundred years ago, long before any other European’s arrived. Did this happen? How valid are the claims? Is it possible? Where is the evidence?

    First Who were the vikings? These are various medieval people originating out of Sweden, Norway and Denmark who became notable for raiding coastal settlements in Europe in the ninth century from Russia to the British Isles. They often raided monasteries that were undefended for the gold. The image conjured in many people’s minds of vikings is the raiding and piracy, but what is more interesting for this discussion are the expansions, settlements and take over of various European territories by vikings. It surprises people to find out that Dublin Ireland was a viking settlement, and that parts of England and France were viking-sized. This helps answer the question as to why Vikings might have pushed deep into north america. This story is not about raiders and pirates, it’s about the need for new territories to move people into. Some of the motivation was about inheritance or rivalries between siblings that led them to want to find unexplored territories, especially places where they wouldn’t have invade with an army.

    We begin our story by visiting the statue of Leif Erikson on Commonwealth Avenue in Boston near Kenmore Square. This is one of many monuments in the area dedicated to Viking exploration. Some are at locations claimed to be actual landing sites or possible settlements. We will attempt to visit and evaluate many of these in parts 2 and 3.

    Full Blog at Lostmassachusetts.com

    Get at Lost Massachusetts Postcard from a Lost Place

    LostMass Podcast Reviews at Apple (podcasts.apple.com)

    Photos at: instagram.com/lostmassachusetts

    Sound Effects From Zapsplat (zapsplat.com)

    Music Courtesy of Free Music Archive (freemusicarchive.org)


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    • 20 min
    Chestnut Hill Does Not Exist E32

    Chestnut Hill Does Not Exist E32

    Chestnut Hill Does Not Exist...or does it???

    Full Blog at lostmassachusetts.com

    We cover the lost history of a town that was never a town but was planned to be. It's not a ghost town, you can still go there: Chestnut Hill. People may imagine it is a distinct town but it is made of pieces of several other cities. How? Listen to the podcast. The Lee family acquired over 160 acres of what many people considered to be remote, rural, dusty, swampy land on the Newton-Brookline border. Part of that land would be transferred to Roxbury. The Lee's would develop the land, bringing families in, clearing it, building roads and houses and then renaming the area "Chestnut Hill". Their goal was to create a new community but Boston's ambitions made that just a dream as the suburbs tightened their borders in response.

    "Named by Francis Lee, who built the first country house in the area in the 1850's, Chestnut Hill is in three different towns"(brooklinehistoricalsociety.org)

    "That still doesn’t explain the Brookline-shaped gap in Boston’s present-day silhouette, though. Between 1868 and 1870, Boston tripled its size by annexing first Roxbury and then Dorchester, promising new infrastructure and development. In 1873, it grew larger still, absorbing Brighton, Charlestown, and West Roxbury. Brookline, however, would later vote against joining Boston, putting a stop to the city’s inland expansion until it annexed Hyde Park in 1912." (realestate.boston.com)

    "The western part of the City of Roxbury split off to form the Town of West Roxbury in 1851.  It survived on its own until 1874, when it was annexed to Boston along with Brighton and Charlestown." (guides.bpl.org)

    A history of the Chestnut Hill Chapel; being an address delivered at the dinner held on October sixteenth, nineteen hundred and thirty-six to celebrate the seventy-fifth anniversary of the founding of the Chapel (archive.org)



    Col. Francis Lee Gravesite

    Crescent Ridge Dairy Bar (crescentridgedairybar.com)

    Temulent

    Get at Lost Massachusetts Postcard from a Lost Place

    LostMass Podcast Reviews at Apple (podcasts.apple.com)

    Photos at: instagram.com/lostmassachusetts

    Sound Effects From Zapsplat (zapsplat.com)

    Music Courtesy of Free Music Archive (freemusicarchive.org)










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    • 40 min
    The Oblong E31

    The Oblong E31

    The Oblong - A mysterious phantom territory between Massachusetts, Connecticut and New York.

    One might think it is easy to draw three straight lines to a point and say: This is Massachusetts, this is Connecticut and this is New York, but apparently that is actually very difficult and literally took centuries to sort out.

    Take a long strange drive with us to the Oblong in our most recent episode.

    We also respond to various listener emails and comments.

    "she refused to repent, she was led to the gallows once more on June 1, 1660" (webpages.uidaho.edu)

    "Connecticut exchanged for the areas of Stamford and Greenwich (which intruded beyond the twenty-mile line) an equivalent amount of land all along the boundary northward to Massachusetts. These ‘Equivalent Lands’ were in a long, narrow ‘Oblong,’ approximately 1 3/4 miles wide." (pattersonhistoricalsociety.org)

    "Birdsall sent word to Quaker communities in Long Island, Rhode Island, and Massachusetts, and a few hardy souls bought 500-acre plots around what they quickly christened Quaker Hill." (hvmag.com)

    Full Blog and more source links at lostmassachusetts.com

    Stop for ice cream at Maple Valley Creamery

    Get at Lost Massachusetts Postcard from a Lost Place

    LostMass Podcast Reviews at Apple (podcasts.apple.com)

    Photos at: instagram.com/lostmassachusetts

    Sound Effects From Zapsplat (zapsplat.com)

    Music Courtesy of Free Music Archive (freemusicarchive.org)


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    • 33 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
16 Ratings

16 Ratings

where's my kid? ,

You’re Back!

So happy to see this pop up in my feed today! Glad you are back and look forward to more adventures!!

Kevinr5 ,

Great pod

Informative and I really liked it since I listened to the whole podcast in a week

From Stoughton!

Farqie ,

Fun and informative podcast

Great subject matter. Interesting perspectives. Garth does an excellent job of bringing our state’s past into today’s world. His storytelling and comfort level gets better with each new episode. Keep up the good work!

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