51 episodes

LSE IQ is a monthly podcast from the London School of Economics and Political Science in which we ask some of the smartest social scientists - and other experts - to answer intelligent questions about economics, politics or society. #LSEIQ

LSE IQ podcast London School of Economics and Political Science

    • Education
    • 4.6 • 40 Ratings

LSE IQ is a monthly podcast from the London School of Economics and Political Science in which we ask some of the smartest social scientists - and other experts - to answer intelligent questions about economics, politics or society. #LSEIQ

    What is it like to be an animal?

    What is it like to be an animal?

    Contributor(s): Dr Jonathan Birch, Professor Kristin Andrews, Dr Rosalind Arden | This episode features Jonathan Birch, Associate Professor in LSE's Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method, Professor Kristin Andrews, the York Research Chair in Animal Minds at York University (Toronto) and Dr Rosalind Arden, Research Fellow at the Centre for Philosophy of Natural and Social Science. 

    • 29 min
    What’s the point of social science in a pandemic?

    What’s the point of social science in a pandemic?

    Contributor(s): Professor Laura Bear, Nikita Simpson, Professor Joan Roses, Dr Adam Oliver, Dr Clare Wenham, Professor Patrick Wallis | In this month’s episode of the LSE IQ podcast we ask, ‘What’s the point of social science in a pandemic?’.
     
    On the 23rd March 2020 Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced the country’s first national lockdown. In the months since, there has been a seismic shift in all our lives. As we embark on 2021 and, hopefully, the latter stages of the pandemic, now is an apt moment to reflect on how we’ve got to where we are. While the scientific community has taken centre stage in the fight to overcome the virus, how have social scientists helped us navigate – and evaluate –the UK’s response?
     
    In this episode we talk to anthropologists Professor Laura Bear and Nikita Simpson, Economic historians Professor Patrick Wallis and Professor Joan Roses, Assistant Professor of Global Health Policy Dr Clare Wenham and behavioural economist Dr Adam Oliver.
     
    Research
     
    ’A good death’ during the Covid-19 pandemic in the UK: a report on key findings and recommendations, by the COVID and Care Research Group
     A Right to Care: The Social Foundations of Recovery from COVID-19, by the COVID and Care Research Group
     The Redistributive Effects of Pandemics: Evidence of the Spanish Flu. By Sergi Basco, Jordi Domenech, and Johanne Rohses
     Separating behavioural science from the herd by Adam Oliver
    Reciprocity and the art of behavioural public policy by Adam Oliver
    What is the future of UK leadership in global health security post Covid-19? By Clare Wenham
    A Dreadful Heritage: Interpreting Epidemic Disease at Eyam, 1666-2000, by Patrick Wallis
    Eyam revisited: lessons from a plague village, by Patrick Wallis
     
    Contributors
     
    Professor Laura Bear
    Nikita Simpson
    Professor Joan Roses
    Dr Adam Oliver
    Dr Clare Wenham
    Professor Patrick Wallis
     

    • 44 min
    Is perfect the enemy of the possible?

    Is perfect the enemy of the possible?

    Contributor(s): Dr Thomas Curran | Jess Winterstein speaks to Dr Thomas Curran about the potential pitfalls of wanting to be perfect. Our society values perfection, but is the concept of perfect really that good for us? The latest episode of LSE IQ explores perfectionism.
    In this bitesized episode of the LSE IQ podcast, Jess Winterstein speaks to Dr Thomas Curran, Associate Professor in the Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science at LSE. While aspiring to perfection may still be viewed positively by many, Dr Curran’s research reveals that the drive to be the best can potentially do more harm than good. Are the potential downsides worth it when balanced against the possible achievements that can come from being a perfectionist? In a discussion which explores the realities of being a perfectionist, we ask, is perfection really worth it?

    Contributors  
    Dr Thomas Curran https://www.lse.ac.uk/PBS/People/Dr-Tom-Curran  
    Research 
    A test of social learning and parent socialization perspectives on the development of perfectionism by Thomas Curran, Daniel J Madigan, Andrew P Hill and Annett Victoria Stornæs
    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/339433945_A_test_of_social_learning_and_parent_socialization_perspectives_on_the_development_of_perfectionism
    Perfectionism Is Increasing Over Time: A Meta-Analysis of Birth Cohort Differences From 1989 to 2016 by Thomas Curran and Andrew P. Hill http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/101352/1/Curran_Hill2018.pdf

    • 17 min
    LSE IQ Episode 31 | Is corruption inevitable?

    LSE IQ Episode 31 | Is corruption inevitable?

    Contributor(s): Michael Muthukrishna, Sandra Sequeira, Jonathan Weigel | Welcome to LSE IQ, the award-winning podcast where we ask social scientists and other experts to answer one intelligent question. In this episode Jess Winterstein asks, "Is corruption inevitable?" Bribery, extortion, cronyism, nepotism – corruption comes in many forms, with varying levels of legality, it costs countries trillions of dollars per year and causes great damage to a nation’s economic prosperity and reputation. Yet despite regular pledges of governments around the world to combat it, corruption still flourishes. Exploring the question, ‘Is corruption inevitable?’, Jess Winterstein talks to Michael Muthukrishna, Sandra Sequeira and Jonathan Weigel Corruption, Cooperation, and the Evolution of Prosocial Institutions by Michael Muthukrishna http://www.lse.ac.uk/lacc/publications/PDFs/Muthukrishna-Corruption-Cooperation-Prosocial-Institutions.pdf
    Corrupting cooperation and how anti-corruption strategies may backfire by Michael Muthukrishna, Patrick Francois, Shayan Pourahmadi and Joseph Henrich http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/83544/1/Muthukrishna_Corrupting%20cooperation%20and%20how_2018.pdf An empirical study of corruption in Ports by Sandra Sequeira and Simeon Djankov, http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/41301/ The Supply of Bribes: Evidence from Roadway Tolls in the D.R. Congo by Otis Reid and Jonathan Weigel https://jonathanweigel.com/jwresearch/motos

    • 42 min
    LSE IQ Episode 30 | How do we stop knife crime?

    LSE IQ Episode 30 | How do we stop knife crime?

    Contributor(s): Yvonne Lawson, Professor Tom Kirchmaier, Carmen Vila-Llera, Janet Foster, Kerris Cooper | Knife crime in England and Wales hit a record high in 2019, up by 7% on the previous year. A disproportionate number of victims - and perpetrators - are young and disadvantaged. Exploring the question, ‘How do we stop knife crime?’, Joanna Bale talks to Kerris Cooper, Janet Foster, Tom Kirchmaier, Yvonne Lawson and Carmen Villa-Llera. Research links: Physical safety and Security: Policies, spending and outcomes 2015-2020 by Kerris Cooper and Nicola Lacey. The Real Sherlocks: Murder Investigators at Work by Janet Foster (due for publication in 2020)

    • 39 min
    LSE IQ Episode 28 | Is the 21st Century the Chinese century?

    LSE IQ Episode 28 | Is the 21st Century the Chinese century?

    Contributor(s): Professor Christopher Coker, Dr Debin Ma, Dr Yu Jie | Welcome to LSE IQ, the award-winning podcast where we ask social scientists and other experts to answer one intelligent question. In this episode Sue Windebank asks, “Is the 21st Century the Chinese century?”
    This month sees the 70th anniversary of the People’s Republic of China. In 1949 the Chinese Communist Party won the Chinese Civil War. Having overthrown the nationalist government of the Republic of China, Mao Zedong declared the People’s Republic on October 1st in Tiananmen Square. The last 70 years have been tumultuous for the People’s Republic of China. Under Mao it experienced economic break down and societal chaos. Famously the Great Leap Forward, a campaign designed to industrialise and modernise the economy, led to the largest famine in history, with millions of people dying of starvation. And yet today, after widespread market-economy reforms started by Deng Xiaoping in the 1970s, China is the second largest economy in the world. This wealth is reflected in the country’s international influence, which is growing through sizeable investments the country is making in large infrastructure projects around the world. And, of course, hundreds of thousands of Chinese students study abroad every year – including at LSE. This episode features: Professor Christopher Coker, LSE Department of International Relations and LSE IDEAS; Dr Debin Ma, LSE Department of Economic History; and Dr Yu Jie, Chatham House. For further information about the podcast and all the related links visit lse.ac.uk/iq and please tell us what you think using the hashtag #LSE.

    • 44 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
40 Ratings

40 Ratings

podccaster ,

Well produced social science podcast

Not another Freakonomics. The episodes are far more rigorous, and while they lack the slickness of the average podcasts, they still deliver a wealth of knowledge.

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