245 episodes

Tales of cybersecurity. The wildest hacks you can ever imagine, told by people who were actually there. Hosted by cybersecurity expert and book author, Ran Levi, this is not your average talk-show. These are fascinating, unknown tales, slowly unraveled, deeply researched. Think Hardcore History meets Hackable- and come dig into a history you never knew existed.

Malicious Life Malicious Life

    • Technology
    • 4.8 • 887 Ratings

Tales of cybersecurity. The wildest hacks you can ever imagine, told by people who were actually there. Hosted by cybersecurity expert and book author, Ran Levi, this is not your average talk-show. These are fascinating, unknown tales, slowly unraveled, deeply researched. Think Hardcore History meets Hackable- and come dig into a history you never knew existed.

    The Y2K Bug, Part 1

    The Y2K Bug, Part 1

    In the 1950s and 60s - even leading into the 1990s - the cost of storage was so high, that using a 2-digit field for dates in a software instead of 4-digits could save an organization between $1.2-$2 Million dollars per GB of data. From this perspective, programming computers in the 1950s to record four-digit years would’ve been outright malpractice. But 40 years later, this shortcut became a ticking time bomb which one man, computer scientist Bob Bemer, was trying to diffuse before it was too late.


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    • 27 min
    Can You Bomb a Hacker?

    Can You Bomb a Hacker?

    The 2008 Russo-Georgian War marked a turning point: the first time cyberattacks were used alongside traditional warfare. But what happens when the attackers aren't soldiers, but ordinary citizens? This episode delves into the ethical and legal implications of civilian participation in cyberwarfare, examining real-world examples from Ukraine and beyond.


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    • 30 min
    Kevin Mitnick, Part 2

    Kevin Mitnick, Part 2

    In 1991, Kevin Mitnick was bouncing back from what was probably the lowest point of his life. He began to rebuild his life: he started working out and lost a hundred pounds, and most importantly - he was finally on the path towards ditching his self-destructive obsession of hacking. 
    But just as he was in the process of turning his life around, his brother introduced him to a hacker named Eric Heinz, who told him about a mysterious piece of equipment he came across while breaking into Pacific Bell: SAS, a testing system that allowed its user to listen in on all the calls going through the telephone network. SAS proved to be too great of a temptation for Mitnick, who desperately wanted to wield the power that the testing system could afford him.


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    • 49 min
    Kevin Mitnick, Part 1

    Kevin Mitnick, Part 1

    For Kevin Mitnick - perhaps the greatest social engineer who ever lived - hacking was an obsession: even though it ruined his marriage, landed him in scary correction facilities and almost cost him his sanity in solitary confinement, Mitnick wasn't able to shake the disease that compelled him to keep breaking into more and more communication systems. 


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    • 37 min
    SIM Registration: Security, or Surveillance?

    SIM Registration: Security, or Surveillance?

    Right now, hundreds of thousands of people in the southern African country of Namibia are faced with a choice. At the end of next month, their phone service is going to be shut off permanently: to prevent that from happening, they’ll have to give up their data privacy. As a result, nearly two million Namibian citizens are facing a data privacy problem which may haunt them for years to come - and hundreds of thousands more are set to join them, or else they’ll lose their phone service for good. All of which raises the question: was making everybody register their SIM cards a good idea in the first place?


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    • 31 min
    The Mariposa Botnet

    The Mariposa Botnet

    In 2008, The 12 million PCs strong Mariposa Botnet infected almost half of Furture 100 companey - but the three men who ran it were basiclly script kiddies who didn't even knew how to code.


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    • 44 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
887 Ratings

887 Ratings

The Silent Observer ,

Amazing cyber secuirty podcast

This is an amazing cyber security podcast.

Beeeee424242442424 ,

Audio is soft

Audio is uneven and it’s hard to follow unfortunately

t00thp4st3 ,

One of the best cybersecurity podcasts

After listening to couple of the most recent episodes I decided to go back and start listening from the beginning this is one of the best podcasts for people whom into cybersecurity. Thank you :)

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